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W January 29th, 2014 11:26 AM

Omega-3 In Salmon
 
This one is perplexing to me. This nutrition database is showing 100 grams
of raw salmon (you have to select 100 grams manually) at 2342 mg:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4104/2

But the same database is showing that the Omega3 in 100 grams of salmon is
only 523 mg when it is "smoked":

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4103/2

How can this be? Smoked salmon is normally not a cooked product? It
leaves the salmon in an almost raw state.

And to add insult to injury, the same database shows that 100 grams of
salmon cooked with dry heat has 2143 mg of Omega3:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4232/2

So if you cook the salmon in an oven with dry heat, then it has almost the
same amount of omega3 as raw salmon, but if you smoke the salmon to kill
bacteria and then vacuum pack it, that destroys all of the Omega3? How can
that make sense?

And now the million dollar question: when I go to a grocery store and buy
what looks like raw salmon slices in a vacuum package in the refrigerated
area of the fish counter, that is marked as "smoked salmon" is this in fact
what the database above means by "smoked"? And such a product
effectively has the vast majority of the Omega3 fats destroyed?

--
W



croy January 30th, 2014 01:14 AM

Omega-3 In Salmon
 
On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 02:26:34 -0800, "W"
wrote:

This one is perplexing to me. This nutrition database is showing 100 grams
of raw salmon (you have to select 100 grams manually) at 2342 mg:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4104/2

But the same database is showing that the Omega3 in 100 grams of salmon is
only 523 mg when it is "smoked":

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4103/2

How can this be? Smoked salmon is normally not a cooked product? It
leaves the salmon in an almost raw state.

And to add insult to injury, the same database shows that 100 grams of
salmon cooked with dry heat has 2143 mg of Omega3:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4232/2

So if you cook the salmon in an oven with dry heat, then it has almost the
same amount of omega3 as raw salmon, but if you smoke the salmon to kill
bacteria and then vacuum pack it, that destroys all of the Omega3? How can
that make sense?

And now the million dollar question: when I go to a grocery store and buy
what looks like raw salmon slices in a vacuum package in the refrigerated
area of the fish counter, that is marked as "smoked salmon" is this in fact
what the database above means by "smoked"? And such a product
effectively has the vast majority of the Omega3 fats destroyed?



To muddy the waters further, it may make more difference
when comparing "farm-raised" salmon to "wild-caught".

What an animal eats can make a surprising difference in the
make-up of the fats in its meat.

--
croy

W January 30th, 2014 02:03 AM

Omega-3 In Salmon
 
"croy" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 02:26:34 -0800, "W"
wrote:

This one is perplexing to me. This nutrition database is showing 100

grams
of raw salmon (you have to select 100 grams manually) at 2342 mg:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4104/2

But the same database is showing that the Omega3 in 100 grams of salmon

is
only 523 mg when it is "smoked":

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4103/2

How can this be? Smoked salmon is normally not a cooked product? It
leaves the salmon in an almost raw state.

And to add insult to injury, the same database shows that 100 grams of
salmon cooked with dry heat has 2143 mg of Omega3:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4232/2

So if you cook the salmon in an oven with dry heat, then it has almost

the
same amount of omega3 as raw salmon, but if you smoke the salmon to kill
bacteria and then vacuum pack it, that destroys all of the Omega3? How

can
that make sense?

And now the million dollar question: when I go to a grocery store and

buy
what looks like raw salmon slices in a vacuum package in the refrigerated
area of the fish counter, that is marked as "smoked salmon" is this in

fact
what the database above means by "smoked"? And such a product
effectively has the vast majority of the Omega3 fats destroyed?



To muddy the waters further, it may make more difference
when comparing "farm-raised" salmon to "wild-caught".


Okay, that point makes perfect sense. Farm raised salmon get fed grains.
Grains have high omega-6.


What an animal eats can make a surprising difference in the
make-up of the fats in its meat.


Chicken, pork, eggs, duck, and farm-raised talapia fish can have up to 10%
to 20% of their fats in omega-6.

Humans have made an incomprehensible mess out of the entire food chain.

--
W



W January 30th, 2014 02:04 AM

Omega-3 In Salmon
 
"W" wrote in message
...
This one is perplexing to me. This nutrition database is showing 100

grams
of raw salmon (you have to select 100 grams manually) at 2342 mg:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4104/2

But the same database is showing that the Omega3 in 100 grams of salmon is
only 523 mg when it is "smoked":

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4103/2

How can this be? Smoked salmon is normally not a cooked product? It
leaves the salmon in an almost raw state.

And to add insult to injury, the same database shows that 100 grams of
salmon cooked with dry heat has 2143 mg of Omega3:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4232/2

So if you cook the salmon in an oven with dry heat, then it has almost the
same amount of omega3 as raw salmon, but if you smoke the salmon to kill
bacteria and then vacuum pack it, that destroys all of the Omega3? How

can
that make sense?

And now the million dollar question: when I go to a grocery store and

buy
what looks like raw salmon slices in a vacuum package in the refrigerated
area of the fish counter, that is marked as "smoked salmon" is this in

fact
what the database above means by "smoked"? And such a product
effectively has the vast majority of the Omega3 fats destroyed?


Further research suggests that smoking does NOT remove significant Omega-3
fats from salmon.

Nutritiondata.self.com is wrong.

--
W




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