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Food Industry Tactics - Like Tobacco Industry Tactics?



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 12th, 2004, 05:02 PM
jbuch
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Default Food Industry Tactics - Like Tobacco Industry Tactics?

Tobacco and Obesity Epidemics: Not So different After All?

BMJ volume 328, pp 1558-60

Global strategies similar to those used against the tobacco industry are
needed to tackle the obesity epidemic, argue researchers in this week's
British Medical Journal (BMJ) [24 June 2004].

Diets across the globe are being shaped by a concentrated and gloval
food industry that is fiercely resisting public health attempts to
promote healthy eating, write the authors.

The food industry tactics are similar to those used by the tobacco
industry - supplying misinformation, use of supposedly conflicting
evidence and hiding negative data.

Firstly, there is the half true contention that there is no such thing
as an unhealthy food, only unhealthy diets. Secondly, the industry
contends that the problem is not the excessive diet, but the reduction
in physical activity.

Thirdly, the industry uses a smoke screen of apparently conflicting
scientific data about sugars and different types of fat. "Although
scientific knowledge is still incomplete, it is less divided than the
industry would have the public believe," say the authors.

Advocates for tobacco control have used a variety of tactics in their
campaign that could have relevance for the fight against unhealthy
diets, suggest the authors.

"It will be much more difficult to establish internationally binding
instruments or conventions like those achieved in toabcco control.
Nevertheless, their importance in bringing about changes in national
behavior should not be under-rated," they say.

Potential international standards might cover issues such as marketing
restrictions for unhealthy food products, restrictions ofn the
advertising and availability of unhealthy products in schools, or
potential price or tax measures to reduce the demand for unhealthy products.

"The public attention generated by the discussion and formulation of
such standards may set general standards for corporate conduct without
being potentially unacceptable and even generate enough political
capital for national legislation," they conclude.

Contact: Emma Diskinson:
44-204-383-6529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

---------------------------------------------


A little old, but still interesting. Anybody have direct access to the
BMJ to read the actual text and any follow-up since publication?
--
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  #2  
Old December 12th, 2004, 09:31 PM
Cubit
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I have no doubt that they would tax the wrong foods in an effort to force
their failed ideas on everyone.

Cigarettes are an addiction. This is different than the need to eat.



"jbuch" wrote in message
...
Tobacco and Obesity Epidemics: Not So different After All?



  #3  
Old December 12th, 2004, 09:31 PM
Cubit
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I have no doubt that they would tax the wrong foods in an effort to force
their failed ideas on everyone.

Cigarettes are an addiction. This is different than the need to eat.



"jbuch" wrote in message
...
Tobacco and Obesity Epidemics: Not So different After All?



  #4  
Old December 13th, 2004, 12:26 AM
Gregory Toomey
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jbuch wrote:

Tobacco and Obesity Epidemics: Not So different After All?

BMJ volume 328, pp 1558-60

Global strategies similar to those used against the tobacco industry are
needed to tackle the obesity epidemic, argue researchers in this week's
British Medical Journal (BMJ) [24 June 2004].


Its not surprising. In recent weeks I've responded to posts claiming
- wine doesn't contain sugar
- low carb diet implies increasing meat in the diet
- low carb diet implies eating manufactured "low carb" supermarket foods

gtoomey
-
  #5  
Old December 13th, 2004, 01:33 AM
MU
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On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 21:31:20 GMT, Cubit wrote:

Cigarettes are an addiction. This is different than the need to eat.


Overconsumption often is an addiction. It is not a need to eat.
  #6  
Old December 13th, 2004, 03:06 AM
jbuch
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Gregory Toomey wrote:

jbuch wrote:


Tobacco and Obesity Epidemics: Not So different After All?

BMJ volume 328, pp 1558-60

Global strategies similar to those used against the tobacco industry are
needed to tackle the obesity epidemic, argue researchers in this week's
British Medical Journal (BMJ) [24 June 2004].



Its not surprising. In recent weeks I've responded to posts claiming
- wine doesn't contain sugar
- low carb diet implies increasing meat in the diet
- low carb diet implies eating manufactured "low carb" supermarket foods

gtoomey
-


Not only do you have to worry about the "Food" industry, but there are
some real sharks and mental cases in the "Diet Industry" that use the
same weapons of ignorance and false facts and selective "studies".

You may have virtually no safe friends in this food/diet battle for
your mind and wallet.

Jim

  #7  
Old December 13th, 2004, 02:40 PM
Cubit
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Bull****. Your assertion is just a popular myth.

Some aspect of the modern diet triggers a malfunction of the body's natural
calorie regulation. It is not an addiction. For example: if you make a
"normal" person overeat, they do not become "addicted" to overeating.

Often, doctors blame the patient, when the doctor has failed to understand a
medical problem. It is easier than admitting that the doctor is not
omniscient. Calling the patient an addict, is just part of blaming the
patient for a medical problem.

"MU" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 21:31:20 GMT, Cubit wrote:

Cigarettes are an addiction. This is different than the need to eat.


Overconsumption often is an addiction. It is not a need to eat.



  #8  
Old December 13th, 2004, 05:00 PM
MU
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Posts: n/a
Default


"MU" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 21:31:20 GMT, Cubit wrote:

Cigarettes are an addiction. This is different than the need to eat.


Overconsumption often is an addiction. It is not a need to eat.


On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:40:15 GMT, Cubit wrote:

Bull****. Your assertion is just a popular myth.


Incorrect. Ask a psychiatrist who deals with addictions.

Some aspect of the modern diet triggers a malfunction of the body's natural
calorie regulation. It is not an addiction. For example: if you make a
"normal" person overeat, they do not become "addicted" to overeating.


Not always but they can.

Often, doctors blame the patient, when the doctor has failed to understand a
medical problem. It is easier than admitting that the doctor is not
omniscient. Calling the patient an addict, is just part of blaming the
patient for a medical problem.


Often? Perhaps, perhaps not. Sometimes, ime. Overconsumption is now only a
physical, medical problem?

Speaking of bull****.....

Btw, if you want to continue a conversation on Usenet with Mu, then top
posting is out. I am getting tired of cleaning up your bull**** top posting
just because you're too lazy to scroll down the page. Outlook is a bull****
newsreader and there are several free ones so you have no bull**** excuses
even if you continue to use Outlook.
  #9  
Old December 13th, 2004, 05:00 PM
MU
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"MU" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 21:31:20 GMT, Cubit wrote:

Cigarettes are an addiction. This is different than the need to eat.


Overconsumption often is an addiction. It is not a need to eat.


On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:40:15 GMT, Cubit wrote:

Bull****. Your assertion is just a popular myth.


Incorrect. Ask a psychiatrist who deals with addictions.

Some aspect of the modern diet triggers a malfunction of the body's natural
calorie regulation. It is not an addiction. For example: if you make a
"normal" person overeat, they do not become "addicted" to overeating.


Not always but they can.

Often, doctors blame the patient, when the doctor has failed to understand a
medical problem. It is easier than admitting that the doctor is not
omniscient. Calling the patient an addict, is just part of blaming the
patient for a medical problem.


Often? Perhaps, perhaps not. Sometimes, ime. Overconsumption is now only a
physical, medical problem?

Speaking of bull****.....

Btw, if you want to continue a conversation on Usenet with Mu, then top
posting is out. I am getting tired of cleaning up your bull**** top posting
just because you're too lazy to scroll down the page. Outlook is a bull****
newsreader and there are several free ones so you have no bull**** excuses
even if you continue to use Outlook.
  #10  
Old December 14th, 2004, 03:12 AM
Roger Zoul
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Posts: n/a
Default

jbuch wrote:
|| Gregory Toomey wrote:
||
||| jbuch wrote:
|||
|||
|||| Tobacco and Obesity Epidemics: Not So different After All?
||||
|||| BMJ volume 328, pp 1558-60
||||
|||| Global strategies similar to those used against the tobacco
|||| industry are needed to tackle the obesity epidemic, argue
|||| researchers in this week's British Medical Journal (BMJ) [24 June
|||| 2004].
||||
|||
|||
||| Its not surprising. In recent weeks I've responded to posts claiming
||| - wine doesn't contain sugar
||| - low carb diet implies increasing meat in the diet
||| - low carb diet implies eating manufactured "low carb" supermarket
||| foods
|||
||| gtoomey
||| -
||
|| Not only do you have to worry about the "Food" industry, but there
|| are some real sharks and mental cases in the "Diet Industry" that
|| use the same weapons of ignorance and false facts and selective
|| "studies".
||
|| You may have virtually no safe friends in this food/diet battle for
|| your mind and wallet.
||
|| Jim

Trust no one.


 




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