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Diet-restricted mice perform better in sports



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 7th, 2005, 01:51 AM
Matthew
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Default Diet-restricted mice perform better in sports


"DZ" wrote in message
...
Calorie-restricted mice perform better in tasks that involve reaction,
speed and have better endurance. The study corroborates on the earlier
finding that the combination of caloric restriction and free exercise
acts synergistically to increase muscle endurance and strength.

Free full text -
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/...4_209/_article


From the study:
"In response to assigned tasks, the diet-restricted mice performed better in
all activities: they climbed out of obstacles faster, freed themselves
sooner from restraint by gummed tape, hung from a bar longer, and better
resisted slipping down a slope."

Most of the tests favor a lower body weight and/or smaller size, so I don't
think you can say calorie restriction can increase muscle strength.

Matthew


  #2  
Old June 7th, 2005, 02:46 AM
Hobbes
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In article , "Matthew"
wrote:

"DZ" wrote in message
...
Calorie-restricted mice perform better in tasks that involve reaction,
speed and have better endurance. The study corroborates on the earlier
finding that the combination of caloric restriction and free exercise
acts synergistically to increase muscle endurance and strength.

Free full text -
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/...4_209/_article


From the study:
"In response to assigned tasks, the diet-restricted mice performed better in
all activities: they climbed out of obstacles faster, freed themselves
sooner from restraint by gummed tape, hung from a bar longer, and better
resisted slipping down a slope."

Most of the tests favor a lower body weight and/or smaller size, so I don't
think you can say calorie restriction can increase muscle strength.


Relative strength is increased, judging by the results. It would be hard
to extrapolate to human success in sports.

--
Keith
  #3  
Old June 7th, 2005, 03:46 AM
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First one is this guy - http://tinyurl.com/2qw6n and the
other one is me

See if helps as you're sliding under that out-of-control taxi that's
hurtling at you at 85 mph.

  #4  
Old June 7th, 2005, 04:47 AM
Larry Hodges
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DZ wrote:
Hobbes wrote:
"Matthew" wrote:
"DZ" wrote:
Calorie-restricted mice perform better in tasks that involve
reaction, speed and have better endurance. The study corroborates
on the earlier finding that the combination of caloric restriction
and free exercise acts synergistically to increase muscle
endurance and strength.

Free full text -
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/...4_209/_article

From the study:
"In response to assigned tasks, the diet-restricted mice performed
better in all activities: they climbed out of obstacles faster,
freed themselves sooner from restraint by gummed tape, hung from a
bar longer, and better resisted slipping down a slope."

Most of the tests favor a lower body weight and/or smaller size, so
I don't think you can say calorie restriction can increase muscle
strength.


Relative strength is increased, judging by the results. It would be
hard to extrapolate to human success in sports.


I remember two individuals posting to these groups who claimed ability
to do multiple muscle-ups. Both are on some sort of dietary
restriction. First one is this guy - http://tinyurl.com/2qw6n and the
other one is me

DZ


This topic is very much of interest to me. I train for health and
longjevity, not a huge body. I'm not really small at 5'10" and 189, 10% BF.
But I like my current size and don't have a desire to get any bigger. I'm
also 48. So I'm setting up to jump into my 50s. I'm thinking lean and on
the small side yet strong is the way to go. I do know that I feel better
when I'm lean. Also, from a MA background, I like the quickness I get from
being this way. IOW, I don't see myself jumping into PL anytime soon.

Please post more on this subject as it comes up in your reading. I find it
interesting.
--
-Larry


  #5  
Old June 7th, 2005, 04:57 AM
Sam
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It can be dangerous to extrapolare to humans from mice...

"DZ" wrote in message
...
Calorie-restricted mice perform better in tasks that involve reaction,
speed and have better endurance. The study corroborates on the earlier
finding that the combination of caloric restriction and free exercise
acts synergistically to increase muscle endurance and strength.

Free full text -
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/...4_209/_article



  #6  
Old June 7th, 2005, 06:23 AM
David Cohen
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Default


"DZ" wrote
Sam wrote:
"DZ" wrote:
Calorie-restricted mice perform better in tasks that involve reaction,
speed and have better endurance. The study corroborates on the earlier
finding that the combination of caloric restriction and free exercise
acts synergistically to increase muscle endurance and strength.

Free full text -
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/...4_209/_article


It can be dangerous to extrapolare to humans from mice...


And even more dangerous not to.
We wouldn't have biology or medicine to speak of.


I volunteer the members of rec.running and alt.support.diet to take the
place of mice, rats, pigs, beagles and chimps in all experiments.

David


  #7  
Old June 7th, 2005, 07:13 AM
Larry Hodges
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David Cohen wrote:
"DZ" wrote
Sam wrote:
"DZ" wrote:
Calorie-restricted mice perform better in tasks that involve
reaction, speed and have better endurance. The study corroborates
on the earlier finding that the combination of caloric restriction
and free exercise acts synergistically to increase muscle
endurance and strength. Free full text -
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/...4_209/_article

It can be dangerous to extrapolare to humans from mice...


And even more dangerous not to.
We wouldn't have biology or medicine to speak of.


I volunteer the members of rec.running and alt.support.diet to take
the place of mice, rats, pigs, beagles and chimps in all experiments.

David


PETA would be happy with that.
--
-Larry


  #8  
Old June 7th, 2005, 08:16 AM
JMW
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steve common wrote:
DZ wrote:

Calorie-restricted mice perform better in tasks that involve reaction,
speed and have better endurance. The study corroborates on the earlier
finding that the combination of caloric restriction and free exercise
acts synergistically to increase muscle endurance and strength.


Could it be that the calorie restriction is stimulating adrenalin production
which in turn has some useful side-effects on reaction times etc, rather
than a real increase in muscle strength?


Why would you assume that?

FWIW, I was able to find one study which indicated that epinephrine
was catecholamine which changed *least* during calorie restriction and
refeeding.
--

JMW
http://www.rustyiron.net
  #9  
Old June 7th, 2005, 08:45 AM
steve common
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JMW wrote:

Why would you assume that?


Not an assumption, more an idea looking for contradiction or confirmation,
hence the post formulated as a question.

It was just a cross between my vague recollection of something I'd read
about the role of adrenalin in both fat metabolism and reaction times (maybe
my last remaining, shriveled neuron is playing up on me :-) and a personal
experience of a keen sharpness during the second half of the Sand Marathon
(one week running in the Sahara desert, av 40km / day, with a 8kg backpack,
3kg of water and ~2400 calories/day)
  #10  
Old June 7th, 2005, 01:00 PM
Zach Braff
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Default

Thanks for the help. I will go with the Cell-Tech.


"DZ" wrote in message
...
Calorie-restricted mice perform better in tasks that involve reaction,
speed and have better endurance. The study corroborates on the earlier
finding that the combination of caloric restriction and free exercise
acts synergistically to increase muscle endurance and strength.

Free full text -
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/...4_209/_article



 




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