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erm, is this article TRUE to any extent?



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 27th, 2003, 03:36 AM
Steven C. \(Doktersteve\)
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default erm, is this article TRUE to any extent?

http://www.dailybruin.ucla.edu/news/...s.asp?id=26538

If you're one of the many college students trying to shed a few pounds, you
might be thinking about going on a diet.

Maybe you're fighting the freshman 15 or you just want to turn a few heads
at Venice Beach. Whatever your reason, you've probably heard of the Atkins
diet - the low-carbohydrate, high-protein and high-fat diet created by
cardiologist Robert Atkins 30 years ago.

The regimen instructs dieters to throw the low-fat adages out with all their
breads and pastas, and encourages people to eat as much bacon and eggs as
they wish.

During the first two weeks dieters eat no more than 20g of carbs -
equivalent to a single slice of bread or a serving of corn. Later, the carb
level is increased slightly until weight loss stops. There are no limits on
protein or fat.

Surprisingly, recent studies show that the Atkins diet works - at least for
a while. Although participants eat high-fat meals, they actually lose weight
more quickly on the Atkins diet than on a low-fat diet.

But is it really possible to eat fatty foods and be thinner?

In April, the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at all the
studies available and found people lost weight on the diet because they ate
fewer calories altogether even though more of their calories came from fat.
Protein is more filling than carbohydrates, which probably helps people on
the Atkins diet feel less hungry.

But before you rush out for 4x4 cheeseburgers at In-N-Out, you should know
there are some definite drawbacks. Eating less fruit and whole grains means
missing out on cancer-fighting benefits of anti-oxidants and fiber.

Eating lots of protein can decrease the amount of calcium in your bones,
increasing your risk for osteoporosis later in life. Calcium loss is even
more of a concern while you're in college because you gain most of your bone
mass before you reach 30. Increased levels of fat and protein are also
linked to kidney stones and kidney problems. Other minor problems include
constipation and bad breath.

Physicians are most concerned about the high amount of saturated fat in the
diet. Saturated fat, which is especially high in red meat and dairy
products, contributes to heart attacks and other heart diseases. However, a
study in the May New England Journal of Medicine shows the effects of the
diet on the heart may not be so bad.

Even though more of their calories come from fat, Atkins dieters eat
slightly less fat overall than they do regularly, and cholesterol levels
actually improved more in individuals on the Atkins diet than in those on a
traditional low-fat regimen.

If you want to try a low-carb diet, a healthier version may involve getting
most of protein from chicken, fish, and nuts, which contain less saturated
fat. Keep in mind, though, that the Atkins diet, like all diets, is not
great at helping you lose weight or stay healthy in the long-term.

After one year, the New England Journal study found the average amount of
weight loss on the Atkins diet was small, only about 4.5 percent after a
year. By then, four out of 10 of those on the Atkins diet had dropped it,
and those still on the low-carb diet actually gained back about half the
weight they lost.

Diets are short-term and, unfortunately, so is the weight loss associated
with them. The best way to really make a long-term impact on your health is
to incorporate small changes in diet along with an exercise plan that you're
comfortable with.

Check out the Student Nutrition Action Committee
(www.studenthealth.ucla.edu/snac) at the Ashe Center for nutritional tips
and body image and fitness workshops.


  #2  
Old November 27th, 2003, 04:52 AM
Stephen S
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default erm, is this article TRUE to any extent?

Hey! I'll hang my post here on the post Steven C. (Doktersteve) sent:

http://www.dailybruin.ucla.edu/news/...s.asp?id=26538


The regimen instructs dieters to throw the low-fat adages out with
all their breads and pastas, and encourages people to eat as much
bacon and eggs as they wish.


Not true... Eat high protein foods and low carb veggies. Bacon and eggs
are just two of dozens of foods mentioned that you can have from day
one.


During the first two weeks dieters eat no more than 20g of carbs -
equivalent to a single slice of bread or a serving of corn. Later,
the carb level is increased slightly until weight loss stops. There
are no limits on protein or fat.


Sorta true... No limits are placed because you start eating less (of
everything) anyway. It's supposed to be self limiting.


Surprisingly, recent studies show that the Atkins diet works - at
least for a while. Although participants eat high-fat meals, they
actually lose weight more quickly on the Atkins diet than on a
low-fat diet.


Nice that they finally are reading the writing on the wall...
let's see if they understand what it says.


But is it really possible to eat fatty foods and be thinner?

In April, the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at
all the studies available and found people lost weight on the diet
because they ate fewer calories altogether even though more of their
calories came from fat. Protein is more filling than carbohydrates,
which probably helps people on the Atkins diet feel less hungry.


Eat less and exercise more... where the hell have I heard that?


But before you rush out for 4x4 cheeseburgers at In-N-Out, you should
know there are some definite drawbacks. Eating less fruit and whole
grains means missing out on cancer-fighting benefits of anti-oxidants
and fiber.


For a month or two?
Then you can start adding them back in. Or find LC alternatives.


Eating lots of protein can decrease the amount of calcium in your
bones, increasing your risk for osteoporosis later in life. Calcium
loss is even more of a concern while you're in college because you
gain most of your bone mass before you reach 30. Increased levels of
fat and protein are also linked to kidney stones and kidney problems.
Other minor problems include constipation and bad breath.


Again with the increased levels line... is this by % or by total volume?


Physicians are most concerned about the high amount of saturated fat
in the diet. Saturated fat, which is especially high in red meat and
dairy products, contributes to heart attacks and other heart
diseases. However, a study in the May New England Journal of Medicine
shows the effects of the diet on the heart may not be so bad.

Even though more of their calories come from fat, Atkins dieters eat
slightly less fat overall than they do regularly, and cholesterol
levels actually improved more in individuals on the Atkins diet than
in those on a traditional low-fat regimen.


There it is again... eat less, ...
where the HELL have I heard that before? g (hi JC!)


If you want to try a low-carb diet, a healthier version may involve
getting most of protein from chicken, fish, and nuts, which contain
less saturated fat. Keep in mind, though, that the Atkins diet, like
all diets, is not great at helping you lose weight or stay healthy in
the long-term.


First part of this paragraph is actually recommended in the book I have.
(I liked the idea that I could go ape on the shrimp at the local Chinese
buffet)
And the second part is yet to be conclusively proven true or false by
controlled medical study. For now it is just conjecture either way.


After one year, the New England Journal study found the average
amount of weight loss on the Atkins diet was small, only about 4.5
percent after a year. By then, four out of 10 of those on the Atkins
diet had dropped it, and those still on the low-carb diet actually
gained back about half the weight they lost.


Average weight loss computed by lumping in the quitters with the people
who did it right and changed their lifestyle WOE. That just doesn't
seem fair somehow.


Diets are short-term and, unfortunately, so is the weight loss
associated with them. The best way to really make a long-term impact
on your health is to incorporate small changes in diet along with an
exercise plan that you're comfortable with.


Atkins is not a diet. It is not meant to be short term. It is a Way Of
Eating that you must adopt for life.

Eat less and exercise more.... DAMN, that saying is getting around
these days.


Check out the Student Nutrition Action Committee
(www.studenthealth.ucla.edu/snac) at the Ashe Center for nutritional
tips and body image and fitness workshops.


--
Stephen S.
331/300/220 - as of 26 Nov. 03
LC since 28 Sept. 03
http://dragonfen.com/diet
--------------------------------


  #3  
Old November 27th, 2003, 05:05 AM
Chakolate
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default erm, is this article TRUE to any extent?

"Steven C. \(Doktersteve\)" wrote
in news:[email protected]:

http://www.dailybruin.ucla.edu/news/...s.asp?id=26538

If you're one of the many college students trying to shed a few
pounds, you might be thinking about going on a diet.

Maybe you're fighting the freshman 15 or you just want to turn a few
heads at Venice Beach. Whatever your reason, you've probably heard of
the Atkins diet - the low-carbohydrate, high-protein and high-fat diet
created by cardiologist Robert Atkins 30 years ago.

The regimen instructs dieters to throw the low-fat adages out with all
their breads and pastas, and encourages people to eat as much bacon
and eggs as they wish.


Yes, you can eat all the bacon and eggs you want, but you're encouraged to
get plenty of veggies and take in as much of the fat as possible
monounsaturated.


During the first two weeks dieters eat no more than 20g of carbs -
equivalent to a single slice of bread or a serving of corn. Later, the
carb level is increased slightly until weight loss stops. There are no
limits on protein or fat.


Sheesh. During induction, Atkins' followers limit their carbs to 20 grams
*per day*, not 20 for the whole two weeks. That may be what the writer
intended to say, but it's certainly not what he actually said.

Surprisingly, recent studies show that the Atkins diet works - at
least for a while. Although participants eat high-fat meals, they
actually lose weight more quickly on the Atkins diet than on a low-fat
diet.

But is it really possible to eat fatty foods and be thinner?

In April, the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at
all the studies available and found people lost weight on the diet
because they ate fewer calories altogether even though more of their
calories came from fat. Protein is more filling than carbohydrates,
which probably helps people on the Atkins diet feel less hungry.


Well, duh! That's written as though it's some sort of trick. That's what
Atkins pointed out when he started this diet - that eating fat made you
feel fuller and so you took in less calories.


But before you rush out for 4x4 cheeseburgers at In-N-Out, you should
know there are some definite drawbacks. Eating less fruit and whole
grains means missing out on cancer-fighting benefits of anti-oxidants
and fiber.

Eating lots of protein can decrease the amount of calcium in your
bones, increasing your risk for osteoporosis later in life. Calcium
loss is even more of a concern while you're in college because you
gain most of your bone mass before you reach 30. Increased levels of
fat and protein are also linked to kidney stones and kidney problems.
Other minor problems include constipation and bad breath.


True. But this WOE involves exercise as well, and that builds bone. It
also involves drinking plenty of water, which will prevent kidney stones.
You don't get constipated if you eat your veggies, and keto-breath can be
handled by reducing your protein intake.


Physicians are most concerned about the high amount of saturated fat
in the diet. Saturated fat, which is especially high in red meat and
dairy products, contributes to heart attacks and other heart diseases.
However, a study in the May New England Journal of Medicine shows the
effects of the diet on the heart may not be so bad.

Even though more of their calories come from fat, Atkins dieters eat
slightly less fat overall than they do regularly, and cholesterol
levels actually improved more in individuals on the Atkins diet than
in those on a traditional low-fat regimen.


For me, cholesterol levels not only improved, they left my doctor
speechless. No more talk of a pill for cholesterol.

If you want to try a low-carb diet, a healthier version may involve
getting most of protein from chicken, fish, and nuts, which contain
less saturated fat. Keep in mind, though, that the Atkins diet, like
all diets, is not great at helping you lose weight or stay healthy in
the long-term.


No, but it really helps people like me, who never met a carb she didn't
like. If I eat *one* starchy food, I need more. Lots more. As long as
I'm low carbing, I just don't crave sugars and starches.

Okay, well, chocolate (particularly a warm Milky Way) but chocolate is
really more of a health food, anyway. :-)

After one year, the New England Journal study found the average amount
of weight loss on the Atkins diet was small, only about 4.5 percent
after a year. By then, four out of 10 of those on the Atkins diet had
dropped it, and those still on the low-carb diet actually gained back
about half the weight they lost.


How interesting that they omitted how many of the low-fat dieters dropped
out and how much they had lost after a year.

Diets are short-term and, unfortunately, so is the weight loss
associated with them. The best way to really make a long-term impact
on your health is to incorporate small changes in diet along with an
exercise plan that you're comfortable with.


No kidding. And if I could have done that, I wouldn't have dieted myself
up to 300 pounds.


There's really nothing new in this, IMO. It's just the medical
establishment singing their same old tired song.

dismounting soapbox

Chakolate

--

When a thing has been said and well, have no scruple. Take it and copy it.
--Anatole France
  #4  
Old November 27th, 2003, 05:21 AM
Cookie Cutter
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default erm, is this article TRUE to any extent?

Here is the original Mayo Clinic Journal article:
http://www.mayo.edu/proceedings/2003/nov/7811a1.pdf


Here is the reporter's take of the study:
http://my.webmd.com/content/Article/...m?pagenumber=1

Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet Drops Weight

Atkins-Like Plan Won't Hurt Cholesterol Levels, but Critics Aren't Impressed

By Sid Kirchheimer
WebMD Medical News
Reviewed By Michael Smith, MD
on Tuesday, November 11, 2003

Nov. 11, 2003 -- Is it really possible to lose weight on a no-starch,
high-fat diet, similar to Atkins, without hurting cholesterol levels?
Apparently so, even for people with heart disease, according to the latest
study on the topic.

The new study details the effects of a no-starch, high-fat diet on 23
patients at risk for diabetes. All were overweight, were taking
cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, and had been diagnosed with heart
disease. The high-saturated fat and no-starch diet was developed eight years
ago by endocrinologist James Hays, MD, in an effort to help his diabetic
patients.

On average, those following his low-carb, high-fat diet lost 5% of their
body weight after only six weeks. For example, a 200-pound person would have
lost 10 pounds.

Importantly, the high-fat diet did not have harmful effects on cholesterol
levels. In fact, the participants saw a lowering of the blood fat called
triglycerides. "Bad" LDL and "good" HDL cholesterol levels didn't change,
but the size of the HDL and LDL molecules increased.

Larger LDL molecules are less likely to form artery-clogging plaques. Larger
HDL molecules stay around in the body longer to clean up more plaque.

"We also saw a significant drop in glucose and insulin levels," Hays tells
WebMD. Higher blood sugar (glucose) and insulin levels indicate the early
signs of diabetes.

Lots of Fat Allowed

Under Hays' plan, half of the daily 1,800 calories come from saturated fats
-- mostly red meats and cheese. "We're not talking about protein, egg
whites, and turkey and white-meat chicken," he says. "We're talking about
fat."

Just days ago, another study at the American Heart Association's annual
meeting compared the low-carb, high-fat Atkins diet to three other popular
diets -- the very low-fat Ornish plan, the high-protein, moderate-carb Zone
diet, and the low-fat, moderate-carb Weight Watchers plan. When devotedly
followed, all produced similar weight loss and reductions in heart disease
risk.

Hays tells WebMD that he believes the heart-healthy benefits of his
Atkins-like eating plan are because of its high intake of saturated fats --
considered by most experts to cause heart disease.

"Cholesterol leaves our body through bile, and high-fat foods cause bile
secretion," he says. "Although I would caution that this is genetically
determined, I think that most people are able to excrete huge amounts of
cholesterol they're consuming with this bile secretion." Still, he advises
that anyone starting any type of high-fat diet keep close tabs on their
cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

Under Hay's low-carb, high-fat diet, milk and starches such as pasta and
baked goods are forbidden and only certain fruits and vegetables can be
eaten. And unlike Atkins, which allows for increased but still low amounts
of carbohydrates the longer participants remain on the plan, Hays' plan
remains constant.

A typical dinner on the Hays plan: "A half-pound of red meat or chicken dark
meat (after cooking), with 1/2 cup of vegetables, 1/2 cup of salad, and a
half piece of fruit. There's lots of oil but no vinegar or other
condiments," he says. Acceptable vegetables include broccoli, cauliflower,
and others that grow above ground; allowed fruits (which must be eaten last
at every meal to keep glucose levels low) include apples, oranges, peaches,
and pears, as long as they are not processed.

"It's very vigorous to eliminate starches completely, but those who do seem
to do very well," Hays says. "We followed two other groups of patients who
weren't taking statin medications for six months and a year, and they lost
15% and 20% of their body weight respectively and had no adverse effects on
their [blood fats]. I've had some patients lose up to 40% of their weight on
this plan."

But Is It Healthy?

Not all are convinced a high-fat diet is the best strategy for the long
term.

"The main reason people lost weight on this diet is because they're
consuming fewer calories than they're used to," says Jen Keller, RD, staff
nutritionist for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, a
nonprofit organization that promotes preventive medicine and a vegetarian
diet.

"It doesn't matter how you lose weight -- you can starve yourself, you can
eat eggs all day, however you do it, if you're eating fewer calories that
you're used to, your blood fats will improve in the short-term," she tells
WebMD. "But a lot of times, when the weight loss plateaus, the benefits in
cholesterol are erased and you're no better off than when you started, and
sometimes worse."

Her group has been a longtime and vocal critic of low-fiber, high-fat diets
such as Atkins, and she is concerned that such eating plans raise the risk
of colon cancer, kidney disease, and other health problems.

"A new study comes out every day talking about what's the best way to lose
weight. If you look at the world's population, the healthiest and thinnest
people are people who follow a plant-based diet," she says. "As they start
to eat more fats, they gain weight and develop health problems."

In an accompanying editorial, Mayo Clinic cardiologist Gerald Gau, MD, urges
doctors to keep an open mind about these high-fat diets. "But I am concerned
about the long-term cardiovascular risk," he writes. "We should continue to
examine the risk-benefit profile of caloric-restricted, more rational diets
such as the Mediterranean diet, which recently was associated with a
striking decrease in cardiovascular risk."
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
SOURCES: Hays, J. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, November 2003; vol 78: pp
1331-1336. Gau, G. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, November 2003; vol 78: pp
1329-1330. American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2003, Orlando,
Fla., Nov. 9-12, 2003. James Hays, MD, endocrinologist, Christiana Care
Health Services, Cardiology Research, Newark, Del. Jen Keller, RD, staff
nutritionist and nutrition projects coordinator, Physicians Committee for
Responsible Medicine (PCRM), Washington, D.C.
\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\


  #5  
Old November 27th, 2003, 05:25 AM
Cookie Cutter
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Posts: n/a
Default erm, is this article TRUE to any extent?

This is a four diet study. A poster( Quentin Grady - I
don't like to steal) on another group I visit occasionally
made the following graph of the study results. Baseline
is the average value before the diet for the subjects and
the values listed are the percent change at the end of
the study -- so, for instance, for WW, LDL dropped 7.7%,
HDL increased 18.5% and the HDL/LDL ratio increased
by 28%.

LDL HDL HDL/LDL
Baseline 100.0 100.0 1.00
Ornish 83.3 102.2 1.23
Weigh****chers 92.3 118.5 1.28
Zone 93.3 114.6 1.23
Atkins 91.4 115.4 1.26

Lana

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/464193
Four Popular Diets Equally Effective for Weight Loss
Peggy Peck

Nov. 10, 2003 (Orlando) - In a randomized study comparing four popular diets
over the course of a year, all diets demonstrated efficacy for weight loss
and reduction of Framingham risk scores, but only the Atkins, Weight
Watchers, and Zone diets achieved statistically significant reductions in
Framingham scores, according to results presented here at the American Heart
Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions.

"Losing 20 pounds corresponded to about a 30% reduction in heart risk
score," said Michael L. Dansinger, MD, assistant professor of medicine at
Tufts University, New England Medical Center, in Boston, Massachusetts.
Although he explained that at this point "it isn't clear if a 30% reduction
in risk score is the same as a 30% reduction in heart attacks." Dr.
Dansinger presented his results at an AHA press conference.

Patients were evenly assigned to the Atkins (low carbohydrates), Zone
(moderate carbohydrates), Ornish (low-fat vegetarian), or Weight Watchers
(moderate fat) diet and told to follow the diet "to the best of their
ability for two months," he said. Patients were given official diet
cookbooks and assigned to small group classes for diet education. For the
remaining 10 months, the volunteers were told to follow their assigned diet
"to whatever extent they wanted." The study "evaluated only the food
program, not any additional lifestyle modifications such as meditation or
exercise," he said.

Following the diets was not easy, Dr. Dansinger said, noting that the
drop-out rate for each diet was 22% at two months and by 12 months half of
the volunteers assigned to Atkins or Ornish had dropped out, as had 35% of
those assigned to Weight Watchers or Zone diets.

For those who stuck with the diet for 12 months, reductions in weight and
Framingham risk score were 3.9% and 12.3% for Atkins (n=21; 52% completion),
6.2% and 6.6% for Ornish (n=20; 50% completion), 4.5% and 14.7% for Weight
Watchers (n=26; 65% completion), and 4.6% and 10.5% for Zone (n=26; 65%
completion). All diets resulted in significant (P .05) weight loss from
baseline and all but the Ornish diet (P = .013) resulted in significant
reductions in the Framingham risk score, he said.

Dr. Dansinger told Medscape that this does not mean that the "Ornish diet
doesn't reduce heart disease risk. I have great faith in the Ornish diet,
but it did not meet the statistical test in this study."

Dean Ornish, MD, founder and president of the Preventive Medicine Research
Institute in Sausalito, California, was immediately critical of the results.
Dr. Ornish told Medscape that the people assigned to his diet "lost more
weight, had greater reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol,
and were the only dieters to significantly lower insulin - even though the
Atkins and Zone diets claim to be specifically designed to lower insulin."

Dr. Dansinger, who joined Dr. Ornish in fielding questions from reporters,
agreed that the Ornish diet posted impressive results for those who stayed
the course for a year: a 19.9% reduction in insulin levels while the Atkins
diet reduced insulin by 7.7%, Weight Watchers by 8.8%, and the Zone by
16.5%. Likewise, the Ornish diet reduced LDL cholesterol by 16.7%, while the
Atkins diet reduced LDL by 8.6%, followed by Weight Watchers dieters at
7.7%, and Zone dieters achieved a 6.7% drop in LDL cholesterol.

But the heart disease risk score is based on the high-density lipoprotein
(HDL)/LDL ratio, and the "Ornish diet does not increase HDL, while the other
diets do achieve significant increases in HDL," said Dr. Dansinger. Weight
Watchers increased HDL cholesterol by 18.5%, while the Atkins and Zone diets
increased HDL by 15.4% and 14.6%, respectively. But the Ornish diet
increased HDL by just 2.2%.

Dr. Ornish said HDL cholesterol is not really a factor because "HDL is
really like a garbage truck that goes around picking up the garbage, which
is bad cholesterol. When you don't have as much bad cholesterol - garbage -
you don't need as many garbage trucks." He added, "Raising HDL is easy: eat
a stick of butter. That will drive up your HDL, but it's not good for you."

Dr. Dansinger said HDL is a little more complicated. For example, "exercise
increases HDL and we do think that low HDL is a risk factor," he said.

"The good news about this study is that we have demonstrated that all these
diets work. That means that physicians can work with patients to select the
diet that is best suited to the patient. For example, if you have a patient
who likes meat, it is unlikely that he or she will comply with the Ornish
diet," said Dr. Dansinger.

"In the short run, I think weight loss trumps everything," said Robert H.
Eckel, MD, chair of the American Heart Association's Nutrition, Physical
Activity, and Metabolism Council and professor of medicine at the University
of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. "If you lose weight, it
doesn't matter how you lose it. But in the long run we don't know the effect
of the macronutrients that you are eating." Dr. Eckel was not involved in
the study.

The study was funded by a National Institutes of Health grant, the Tufts-New
England Medical Center, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Nutrition
Research Center at Tufts.

AHA 2003 Scientific Sessions: Abstract 3535. Presented Nov. 12, 2003.

Reviewed by Gary D. Vogin, MD



--
############
"Steven C. (Doktersteve)" wrote in
message news:[email protected]
http://www.dailybruin.ucla.edu/news/...s.asp?id=26538

If you're one of the many college students trying to shed a few pounds,

you
might be thinking about going on a diet.

Maybe you're fighting the freshman 15 or you just want to turn a few heads
at Venice Beach. Whatever your reason, you've probably heard of the Atkins
diet - the low-carbohydrate, high-protein and high-fat diet created by
cardiologist Robert Atkins 30 years ago.

The regimen instructs dieters to throw the low-fat adages out with all

their
breads and pastas, and encourages people to eat as much bacon and eggs as
they wish.

During the first two weeks dieters eat no more than 20g of carbs -
equivalent to a single slice of bread or a serving of corn. Later, the

carb
level is increased slightly until weight loss stops. There are no limits

on
protein or fat.

Surprisingly, recent studies show that the Atkins diet works - at least

for
a while. Although participants eat high-fat meals, they actually lose

weight
more quickly on the Atkins diet than on a low-fat diet.

But is it really possible to eat fatty foods and be thinner?

In April, the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at all

the
studies available and found people lost weight on the diet because they

ate
fewer calories altogether even though more of their calories came from

fat.
Protein is more filling than carbohydrates, which probably helps people on
the Atkins diet feel less hungry.

But before you rush out for 4x4 cheeseburgers at In-N-Out, you should know
there are some definite drawbacks. Eating less fruit and whole grains

means
missing out on cancer-fighting benefits of anti-oxidants and fiber.

Eating lots of protein can decrease the amount of calcium in your bones,
increasing your risk for osteoporosis later in life. Calcium loss is even
more of a concern while you're in college because you gain most of your

bone
mass before you reach 30. Increased levels of fat and protein are also
linked to kidney stones and kidney problems. Other minor problems include
constipation and bad breath.

Physicians are most concerned about the high amount of saturated fat in

the
diet. Saturated fat, which is especially high in red meat and dairy
products, contributes to heart attacks and other heart diseases. However,

a
study in the May New England Journal of Medicine shows the effects of the
diet on the heart may not be so bad.

Even though more of their calories come from fat, Atkins dieters eat
slightly less fat overall than they do regularly, and cholesterol levels
actually improved more in individuals on the Atkins diet than in those on

a
traditional low-fat regimen.

If you want to try a low-carb diet, a healthier version may involve

getting
most of protein from chicken, fish, and nuts, which contain less saturated
fat. Keep in mind, though, that the Atkins diet, like all diets, is not
great at helping you lose weight or stay healthy in the long-term.

After one year, the New England Journal study found the average amount of
weight loss on the Atkins diet was small, only about 4.5 percent after a
year. By then, four out of 10 of those on the Atkins diet had dropped it,
and those still on the low-carb diet actually gained back about half the
weight they lost.

Diets are short-term and, unfortunately, so is the weight loss associated
with them. The best way to really make a long-term impact on your health

is
to incorporate small changes in diet along with an exercise plan that

you're
comfortable with.

Check out the Student Nutrition Action Committee
(www.studenthealth.ucla.edu/snac) at the Ashe Center for nutritional tips
and body image and fitness workshops.




  #6  
Old November 27th, 2003, 05:32 AM
Cookie Cutter
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default erm, is this article TRUE to any extent?

There have been several studies published recently that show
low-carb dieters losing more weight and consuming more
calories than a low-fat group of dieters. This one is on the
www.atkinscenter.com website:

Teens Triumph on Controlled Carbohydrate Program
A recent but significant study pokes a large hole in the idea that weight
loss is simply a matter of restricting calories(1). Results of the study,
conducted at Schneider Children's Hospital in New Hyde Park, N.Y., were
presented at a meeting of the Society for Adolescent Medicine in Washington,
D.C. Marc Jacobson, M.D., reported on his findings, involving children
ranging in age from 12 to 18, all of whom were between 20 and 100 pounds
overweight. He found that teens following a controlled carb plan were more
successful in their weight-loss efforts than those following a low-fat,
high-carb plan, even though the former ate an average of 730 more calories
daily.

Members of the controlled carb group were allowed to eat as many calories as
they wanted in the form of meat, fish, fowl and cheese, two salads a day and
minimal other carbs. The low-fat group ate fat-free dairy products, whole
grains, low-fat meats, poultry and fish and many fruits and vegetables. They
were limited to 1,100 calories a day. The results speak for themselves:
Teens in the controlled carb group lost an average of 19 pounds during a
12-week period; low-fat dieters averaged 8.5 pounds. The controlled carb
group also showed a greater decrease in overall serum cholesterol levels and
triglyceride levels were reduced by 52 percent, as compared to a 10 percent
drop for the low-fat group. High-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good,"
cholesterol levels increased in the controlled carb group and decreased in
the low-fat group.

Two myths often perpetuated by critics of Atkins were also addressed in this
study. Skeptics who don't actually understand the process of
lipolysis/ketosis have often stated that the Atkins Nutritional ApproachTM
is effective only because fewer calories are consumed. As Atkins followers
can attest, they can eat plenty of delicious, whole foods. In the Schneider
study, the controlled carb group consumed an average of 1,830 calories a
day, 66 percent more than the low-fat group's average, while losing almost 1
pound more per week. Another myth is that Atkins can damage kidneys.
Schneider researchers monitored kidney and liver functions and found that
they were unaffected by the controlled carb diet.

Dr. Jacobson attributes the weight loss success of the controlled carb
dieters to suppressed insulin levels, resulting from carbohydrate
restriction. This, in turn, stops the body from "laying down new fat," he
says, forcing it to burn fat already accumulated in the body. After three
months on a weight-loss plan, study participants followed a maintenance diet
that included additional carbohydrates. Six to 12 months later, most of the
controlled carb followers had maintained their new weight. The study
provides additional evidence for the efficacy of a high-protein, controlled
carb weight loss program, specifically for teenagers.

Selected References
Sondike, S.B., Copperman, N.M., Jacobson, M.S., "Low Carbohydrate Dieting
Increases Weight Loss but not Cardiovascular Risk in Obese Adolescents: A
Randomized Controlled Trial,"Journal of Adolescent Health, 26, 2000, page
91.


--
############
"Steven C. (Doktersteve)" wrote in
message news:[email protected]
http://www.dailybruin.ucla.edu/news/...s.asp?id=26538

If you're one of the many college students trying to shed a few pounds,

you
might be thinking about going on a diet.

Maybe you're fighting the freshman 15 or you just want to turn a few heads
at Venice Beach. Whatever your reason, you've probably heard of the Atkins
diet - the low-carbohydrate, high-protein and high-fat diet created by
cardiologist Robert Atkins 30 years ago.

The regimen instructs dieters to throw the low-fat adages out with all

their
breads and pastas, and encourages people to eat as much bacon and eggs as
they wish.

During the first two weeks dieters eat no more than 20g of carbs -
equivalent to a single slice of bread or a serving of corn. Later, the

carb
level is increased slightly until weight loss stops. There are no limits

on
protein or fat.

Surprisingly, recent studies show that the Atkins diet works - at least

for
a while. Although participants eat high-fat meals, they actually lose

weight
more quickly on the Atkins diet than on a low-fat diet.

But is it really possible to eat fatty foods and be thinner?

In April, the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at all

the
studies available and found people lost weight on the diet because they

ate
fewer calories altogether even though more of their calories came from

fat.
Protein is more filling than carbohydrates, which probably helps people on
the Atkins diet feel less hungry.

But before you rush out for 4x4 cheeseburgers at In-N-Out, you should know
there are some definite drawbacks. Eating less fruit and whole grains

means
missing out on cancer-fighting benefits of anti-oxidants and fiber.

Eating lots of protein can decrease the amount of calcium in your bones,
increasing your risk for osteoporosis later in life. Calcium loss is even
more of a concern while you're in college because you gain most of your

bone
mass before you reach 30. Increased levels of fat and protein are also
linked to kidney stones and kidney problems. Other minor problems include
constipation and bad breath.

Physicians are most concerned about the high amount of saturated fat in

the
diet. Saturated fat, which is especially high in red meat and dairy
products, contributes to heart attacks and other heart diseases. However,

a
study in the May New England Journal of Medicine shows the effects of the
diet on the heart may not be so bad.

Even though more of their calories come from fat, Atkins dieters eat
slightly less fat overall than they do regularly, and cholesterol levels
actually improved more in individuals on the Atkins diet than in those on

a
traditional low-fat regimen.

If you want to try a low-carb diet, a healthier version may involve

getting
most of protein from chicken, fish, and nuts, which contain less saturated
fat. Keep in mind, though, that the Atkins diet, like all diets, is not
great at helping you lose weight or stay healthy in the long-term.

After one year, the New England Journal study found the average amount of
weight loss on the Atkins diet was small, only about 4.5 percent after a
year. By then, four out of 10 of those on the Atkins diet had dropped it,
and those still on the low-carb diet actually gained back about half the
weight they lost.

Diets are short-term and, unfortunately, so is the weight loss associated
with them. The best way to really make a long-term impact on your health

is
to incorporate small changes in diet along with an exercise plan that

you're
comfortable with.

Check out the Student Nutrition Action Committee
(www.studenthealth.ucla.edu/snac) at the Ashe Center for nutritional tips
and body image and fitness workshops.




  #7  
Old November 27th, 2003, 06:49 AM
Tony Lew
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default erm, is this article TRUE to any extent?

"Steven C. \(Doktersteve\)" wrote in message news:[email protected]
http://www.dailybruin.ucla.edu/news/...s.asp?id=26538


The student who wrote this needs a class in basic logic:


If you're one of the many college students trying to shed a few pounds, you
might be thinking about going on a diet.

Maybe you're fighting the freshman 15 or you just want to turn a few heads
at Venice Beach. Whatever your reason, you've probably heard of the Atkins
diet - the low-carbohydrate, high-protein and high-fat diet created by
cardiologist Robert Atkins 30 years ago.

The regimen instructs dieters to throw the low-fat adages out with all their
breads and pastas, and encourages people to eat as much bacon and eggs as
they wish.

During the first two weeks dieters eat no more than 20g of carbs -
equivalent to a single slice of bread or a serving of corn. Later, the carb
level is increased slightly until weight loss stops. There are no limits on
protein or fat.

Surprisingly, recent studies show that the Atkins diet works - at least for
a while. Although participants eat high-fat meals, they actually lose weight
more quickly on the Atkins diet than on a low-fat diet.

But is it really possible to eat fatty foods and be thinner?

In April, the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at all the
studies available and found people lost weight on the diet because they ate
fewer calories altogether even though more of their calories came from fat.
Protein is more filling than carbohydrates, which probably helps people on
the Atkins diet feel less hungry.


This is a bad thing?


But before you rush out for 4x4 cheeseburgers at In-N-Out, you should know
there are some definite drawbacks. Eating less fruit and whole grains means
missing out on cancer-fighting benefits of anti-oxidants and fiber.


Atkins permits lots of veggies with fiber and anti-oxidants.
Try doing some research, Mr. College Student.


Eating lots of protein can decrease the amount of calcium in your bones,
increasing your risk for osteoporosis later in life. Calcium loss is even
more of a concern while you're in college because you gain most of your bone
mass before you reach 30. Increased levels of fat and protein are also
linked to kidney stones and kidney problems. Other minor problems include
constipation and bad breath.

Physicians are most concerned about the high amount of saturated fat in the
diet. Saturated fat, which is especially high in red meat and dairy
products, contributes to heart attacks and other heart diseases. However, a
study in the May New England Journal of Medicine shows the effects of the
diet on the heart may not be so bad.

Even though more of their calories come from fat, Atkins dieters eat
slightly less fat overall than they do regularly, and cholesterol levels
actually improved more in individuals on the Atkins diet than in those on a
traditional low-fat regimen.


The fact that high-fat diet improves cholesteral levels more than a
low-fat diet should cause one to start doubting the claim that saturated
fats increase cholesterol. If the data doesn't support the theory,
something's wrong with the theory.



If you want to try a low-carb diet, a healthier version may involve getting
most of protein from chicken, fish, and nuts, which contain less saturated
fat.


BUT YOU JUST WROTE IN THE LAST PARAGRAPH THAT THE ATKINS DIET
IMPROVED CHOLESTEROL LEVELS MORE THAN A LOW FAT DIET, AND NOW
YOU'RE RECOMMENDING REDUCING FAT ANYWAY???
WTF???

Keep in mind, though, that the Atkins diet, like all diets, is not
great at helping you lose weight or stay healthy in the long-term.

After one year, the New England Journal study found the average amount of
weight loss on the Atkins diet was small, only about 4.5 percent after a
year. By then, four out of 10 of those on the Atkins diet had dropped it,
and those still on the low-carb diet actually gained back about half the
weight they lost.

Diets are short-term and, unfortunately, so is the weight loss associated
with them. The best way to really make a long-term impact on your health is
to incorporate small changes in diet along with an exercise plan that you're
comfortable with.

Check out the Student Nutrition Action Committee
(www.studenthealth.ucla.edu/snac) at the Ashe Center for nutritional tips
and body image and fitness workshops.

  #8  
Old November 27th, 2003, 11:59 AM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default erm, is this article TRUE to any extent?

I gotta tell ya, since I have been on an LC diet for 2 months, I have found
that I eat more vegetables and more fiber than I ever did before. The type
of vegetables certainly has changed and definately the color of the
vegetables has changed - a hell lot more of them are green now. At the same
time, I find my self questioning the "high protien" statments I keep hearing
as I am not eating any more protien / meat than before but it IS a much
larger percentage of what I eat. I am also drinking probably 10 times the
amount of water I used to and find that I naturally want to drink water. As
far as not getting the vitamins and other nutrients that I was on a so
called balanced diet..well..lets see...I'm not getting my vitamins anymore
since I gave up ...drum roll please ... bread, potatoes, sugar???

These "medical professionals" and their persistant prattle keep reminding me
of one fact; That if I were to make the number of un-educated, bad, and
wrong decisions in my profession as much as they do, I would have been out
of work a long time ago!

"Steven C. (Doktersteve)" wrote in
message news:[email protected]
http://www.dailybruin.ucla.edu/news/...s.asp?id=26538

If you're one of the many college students trying to shed a few pounds,

you
might be thinking about going on a diet.

Maybe you're fighting the freshman 15 or you just want to turn a few heads
at Venice Beach. Whatever your reason, you've probably heard of the Atkins
diet - the low-carbohydrate, high-protein and high-fat diet created by
cardiologist Robert Atkins 30 years ago.

The regimen instructs dieters to throw the low-fat adages out with all

their
breads and pastas, and encourages people to eat as much bacon and eggs as
they wish.

During the first two weeks dieters eat no more than 20g of carbs -
equivalent to a single slice of bread or a serving of corn. Later, the

carb
level is increased slightly until weight loss stops. There are no limits

on
protein or fat.

Surprisingly, recent studies show that the Atkins diet works - at least

for
a while. Although participants eat high-fat meals, they actually lose

weight
more quickly on the Atkins diet than on a low-fat diet.

But is it really possible to eat fatty foods and be thinner?

In April, the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at all

the
studies available and found people lost weight on the diet because they

ate
fewer calories altogether even though more of their calories came from

fat.
Protein is more filling than carbohydrates, which probably helps people on
the Atkins diet feel less hungry.

But before you rush out for 4x4 cheeseburgers at In-N-Out, you should know
there are some definite drawbacks. Eating less fruit and whole grains

means
missing out on cancer-fighting benefits of anti-oxidants and fiber.

Eating lots of protein can decrease the amount of calcium in your bones,
increasing your risk for osteoporosis later in life. Calcium loss is even
more of a concern while you're in college because you gain most of your

bone
mass before you reach 30. Increased levels of fat and protein are also
linked to kidney stones and kidney problems. Other minor problems include
constipation and bad breath.

Physicians are most concerned about the high amount of saturated fat in

the
diet. Saturated fat, which is especially high in red meat and dairy
products, contributes to heart attacks and other heart diseases. However,

a
study in the May New England Journal of Medicine shows the effects of the
diet on the heart may not be so bad.

Even though more of their calories come from fat, Atkins dieters eat
slightly less fat overall than they do regularly, and cholesterol levels
actually improved more in individuals on the Atkins diet than in those on

a
traditional low-fat regimen.

If you want to try a low-carb diet, a healthier version may involve

getting
most of protein from chicken, fish, and nuts, which contain less saturated
fat. Keep in mind, though, that the Atkins diet, like all diets, is not
great at helping you lose weight or stay healthy in the long-term.

After one year, the New England Journal study found the average amount of
weight loss on the Atkins diet was small, only about 4.5 percent after a
year. By then, four out of 10 of those on the Atkins diet had dropped it,
and those still on the low-carb diet actually gained back about half the
weight they lost.

Diets are short-term and, unfortunately, so is the weight loss associated
with them. The best way to really make a long-term impact on your health

is
to incorporate small changes in diet along with an exercise plan that

you're
comfortable with.

Check out the Student Nutrition Action Committee
(www.studenthealth.ucla.edu/snac) at the Ashe Center for nutritional tips
and body image and fitness workshops.




  #9  
Old November 27th, 2003, 06:47 PM
Tony Lew
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default erm, is this article TRUE to any extent?

"Cookie Cutter" wrote in message ...
Here is the original Mayo Clinic Journal article:
http://www.mayo.edu/proceedings/2003/nov/7811a1.pdf


Here is the reporter's take of the study:
http://my.webmd.com/content/Article/...m?pagenumber=1

Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet Drops Weight

Atkins-Like Plan Won't Hurt Cholesterol Levels, but Critics Aren't Impressed

By Sid Kirchheimer
WebMD Medical News
Reviewed By Michael Smith, MD
on Tuesday, November 11, 2003


deletia

Not all are convinced a high-fat diet is the best strategy for the long
term.

"The main reason people lost weight on this diet is because they're
consuming fewer calories than they're used to," says Jen Keller, RD, staff
nutritionist for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, a
nonprofit organization that promotes preventive medicine and a vegetarian
diet.

"It doesn't matter how you lose weight -- you can starve yourself, you can
eat eggs all day, however you do it, if you're eating fewer calories that
you're used to, your blood fats will improve in the short-term," she tells
WebMD. "But a lot of times, when the weight loss plateaus, the benefits in
cholesterol are erased and you're no better off than when you started, and
sometimes worse."

Her group has been a longtime and vocal critic of low-fiber, high-fat diets
such as Atkins, and she is concerned that such eating plans raise the risk
of colon cancer, kidney disease, and other health problems.


Hey, Mr. Kircheimer,
Do you really think it's a good idea to ask a militan vegan/animal
rights group like the "Physician's Committee for Responsible Medicine"
for an unbiased opinion on a meat-based diet? Isn't this like asking
a member of Al-Qaida for an "unbiased" opinion of Judaism?







"A new study comes out every day talking about what's the best way to lose
weight. If you look at the world's population, the healthiest and thinnest
people are people who follow a plant-based diet," she says. "As they start
to eat more fats, they gain weight and develop health problems."

In an accompanying editorial, Mayo Clinic cardiologist Gerald Gau, MD, urges
doctors to keep an open mind about these high-fat diets. "But I am concerned
about the long-term cardiovascular risk," he writes. "We should continue to
examine the risk-benefit profile of caloric-restricted, more rational diets
such as the Mediterranean diet, which recently was associated with a
striking decrease in cardiovascular risk."
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
SOURCES: Hays, J. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, November 2003; vol 78: pp
1331-1336. Gau, G. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, November 2003; vol 78: pp
1329-1330. American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2003, Orlando,
Fla., Nov. 9-12, 2003. James Hays, MD, endocrinologist, Christiana Care
Health Services, Cardiology Research, Newark, Del. Jen Keller, RD, staff
nutritionist and nutrition projects coordinator, Physicians Committee for
Responsible Medicine (PCRM), Washington, D.C.
\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\

  #10  
Old November 28th, 2003, 01:54 AM
Stan Marks
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default erm, is this article TRUE to any extent?

In article [email protected],
"Steven C. \(Doktersteve\)"
wrote:

http://www.dailybruin.ucla.edu/news/...s.asp?id=26538


http://www.lowcarbresearch.org/lcr/results.asp

If you're one of the many college students trying to shed a few pounds, you
might be thinking about going on a diet.

Maybe you're fighting the freshman 15 or you just want to turn a few heads
at Venice Beach. Whatever your reason, you've probably heard of the Atkins
diet - the low-carbohydrate, high-protein and high-fat diet created by
cardiologist Robert Atkins 30 years ago.

The regimen instructs dieters to throw the low-fat adages out with all their
breads and pastas, and encourages people to eat as much bacon and eggs as
they wish.

During the first two weeks dieters eat no more than 20g of carbs -
equivalent to a single slice of bread or a serving of corn. Later, the carb
level is increased slightly until weight loss stops. There are no limits on
protein or fat.

Surprisingly, recent studies show that the Atkins diet works - at least for
a while. Although participants eat high-fat meals, they actually lose weight
more quickly on the Atkins diet than on a low-fat diet.

But is it really possible to eat fatty foods and be thinner?

In April, the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at all the
studies available and found people lost weight on the diet because they ate
fewer calories altogether even though more of their calories came from fat.
Protein is more filling than carbohydrates, which probably helps people on
the Atkins diet feel less hungry.

But before you rush out for 4x4 cheeseburgers at In-N-Out, you should know
there are some definite drawbacks. Eating less fruit and whole grains means
missing out on cancer-fighting benefits of anti-oxidants and fiber.

Eating lots of protein can decrease the amount of calcium in your bones,
increasing your risk for osteoporosis later in life. Calcium loss is even
more of a concern while you're in college because you gain most of your bone
mass before you reach 30. Increased levels of fat and protein are also
linked to kidney stones and kidney problems. Other minor problems include
constipation and bad breath.

Physicians are most concerned about the high amount of saturated fat in the
diet. Saturated fat, which is especially high in red meat and dairy
products, contributes to heart attacks and other heart diseases. However, a
study in the May New England Journal of Medicine shows the effects of the
diet on the heart may not be so bad.

Even though more of their calories come from fat, Atkins dieters eat
slightly less fat overall than they do regularly, and cholesterol levels
actually improved more in individuals on the Atkins diet than in those on a
traditional low-fat regimen.

If you want to try a low-carb diet, a healthier version may involve getting
most of protein from chicken, fish, and nuts, which contain less saturated
fat. Keep in mind, though, that the Atkins diet, like all diets, is not
great at helping you lose weight or stay healthy in the long-term.

After one year, the New England Journal study found the average amount of
weight loss on the Atkins diet was small, only about 4.5 percent after a
year. By then, four out of 10 of those on the Atkins diet had dropped it,
and those still on the low-carb diet actually gained back about half the
weight they lost.

Diets are short-term and, unfortunately, so is the weight loss associated
with them. The best way to really make a long-term impact on your health is
to incorporate small changes in diet along with an exercise plan that you're
comfortable with.

Check out the Student Nutrition Action Committee
(www.studenthealth.ucla.edu/snac) at the Ashe Center for nutritional tips
and body image and fitness workshops.


 




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