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I Got this enema bag, I actualy lost 5 lb in one week



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 28th, 2004, 04:15 AM
Mary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default I Got this enema bag, I actualy lost 5 lb in one week

Hope no one is offended.

Just thought some people here may be interested in where to get a good
enema bag Kit

They also have a good enema soap that comes with the bags and a herbal
body detox program that was good

Any way, take a look if you think you may be interested


http://www.EnemaKit.com

Some people here may want to try that

Mary
  #2  
Old May 28th, 2004, 01:22 PM
Carol Frilegh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default I Got this enema bag, I actualy lost 5 lb in one week

In article , Mary
wrote:

Hope no one is offended.

Just thought some people here may be interested in where to get a good
enema bag Kit

They also have a good enema soap that comes with the bags and a herbal
body detox program that was good

Any way, take a look if you think you may be interested


http://www.EnemaKit.com

Some people here may want to try that

Mary


What an ass-a-nine suggestion!LOL.

--
Diva
*****
The Best Man for the Job May Be A Woman
  #3  
Old May 28th, 2004, 01:42 PM
Steve
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default I Got this enema bag, I actualy lost 5 lb in one week

Mary wrote:
Just thought some people here may be interested in where to get a good
enema bag Kit


I just eat a healthy diet that has fiber: legumes, whole grains, fruit,
vegtables, flax

Some people here may want to try that


Are you implying that some people are "full of it" on usenet?

Steve
  #4  
Old May 28th, 2004, 01:58 PM
susanjoneslewis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default I Got this enema bag, I actualy lost 5 lb in one week


LOL!!! Carol you kill me lol

Susan
260/192/140

"Carol Frilegh" wrote in message
...
In article , Mary
wrote:

Hope no one is offended.

Just thought some people here may be interested in where to get a

good
enema bag Kit

They also have a good enema soap that comes with the bags and a

herbal
body detox program that was good

Any way, take a look if you think you may be interested


http://www.EnemaKit.com

Some people here may want to try that

Mary


What an ass-a-nine suggestion!LOL.

--
Diva
*****
The Best Man for the Job May Be A Woman



  #5  
Old May 28th, 2004, 01:59 PM
GaryG
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default I Got this enema bag, I actualy lost 5 lb in one week

"Mary" wrote in message
om...
Hope no one is offended.

Just thought some people here may be interested in where to get a good
enema bag Kit

They also have a good enema soap that comes with the bags and a herbal
body detox program that was good

Any way, take a look if you think you may be interested


http://www.EnemaKit.com

Some people here may want to try that


You are are so FOS...


Mary



  #6  
Old May 28th, 2004, 02:37 PM
Dally
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default I Got this enema bag, I actualy lost 5 lb in one week

Mary wrote:

Hope no one is offended.


By spam? Why, yes, I am. In fact, it is so offensive that it is
against the rules of decent conduct on every usenet group on which you
posted. It turns out that we are ALL trying to make a living. Selling
our products and services in this (social) forum will quickly drown out
the usefulness of usenet. Therefore, it's against the rules.

So stick it up your ass.

Dally

  #7  
Old May 28th, 2004, 03:28 PM
Steve
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default I Got this enema bag, I actualy lost 5 lb in one week

Dally wrote:
So stick it up your ass.


The spam or her enema ?


Steve
http://www.geocities.com/beforewisdom/

"The great American thought trap: It is not real unless it can be seen
on television or bought in a shopping mall"
  #8  
Old May 28th, 2004, 07:35 PM
jamie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dangers of detox diets (Aus report)

Mary wrote:
Just thought some people here may be interested in where to get a good
enema bag Kit
They also have a good enema soap that comes with the bags and a herbal
body detox program that was good


"Detox" marketers are as full of **** as you were.


The Weekend Australian
The dangers of detox diets
By Emily Smith
May 08, 2004

After a Christmas or Easter break the inevitable cry of "I'm detoxing" is
heard around the Western world with people signing up for a two-day or
two-week diet designed to fix all the ills of a long weekend or lifetime of
poor diet and pollutants. But is detoxing really as effective or safe as
commonly believed?

Dietitians have been fighting the misconceptions surrounding detox diets for
years and say that not only are the diets ineffective but they can also be
dangerous.

Tania Ferraretto is a privately practising dietitian and spokesperson for
the Dietitians Association of Australia. Dr Ferraretto sees a dozen people a
year after Christmas who have been on detox diets and says that while
increasing fruit and vegetable intake is desirable for most people,
short-term diets will not affect long-term health.

"They usually come to see me because the diet is not working or having the
effects they expected," she says. "I recently saw a woman, she was in her
30s ,and wanted to lose weight and started on a restricted diet of fruit and
vegetables. When she came to me, saying that the diet was not working, she
displayed the classic symptoms: tiredness and lethargy, constipation and bad
breath."

But Ferraretto says while these are relatively mild symptoms, if a diet
involves restricted food intake over a long period more serious conditions
can develop, varying from bowel and respiratory problems to vitamin and
mineral deficiencies.

Many detox diets also prescribe copious amounts of water that can, in
extreme cases, result in water toxicity, or hyponatraemia; when sodium
levels and other body salts, or electrolytes, in the blood are too dilute.

The dangers of hyponatraemia and detoxing were seen in a case in Britain
last year when The Times reported a 23-year-old man going into a coma for
four days after a 21-day detox diet of fruit, vegetables, juice and water.
The lack of sodium combined with at least five litres of water a day caused
his sodium levels to drop and his brain to swell.

It is easy to see how detoxing can look attractive, in theory. Most detox
diets assert that too much of the wrong sorts of food, a polluted
environment, and unhealthy habits such as drinking and smoking contribute to
a build-up of poisonous substances in the body.

According to the theories, by adhering to a diet of "pure" foods you will
purge yourself of poisons and undo the damage wreaked on your health. The
purported solution commonly involves drinking two litres or more of water,
accompanied by fruit or vegetable juice and unlimited consumption of raw
fruit and vegetables.

Meat, dairy and starches such as bread or pasta are usually recommended in
small amounts or excluded all together.

However, recent US trials of detox plans at the University of Southern
California found that none of the prominent detox diets, including a version
of the popular liver-cleansing diet and the fruit-juice diet, lived up to
the claims that they would purge environmental toxins over and above what
the body does naturally.

Clare Collins, a consultant dietitian from the University of Newcastle, says
that while there is merit in encouraging people to increase their fruit and
vegetable intake, the misconception is that excluding food groups will give
the body a rest, or that the body even needs a rest. "Your body detoxes
naturally all the time through the liver and the kidneys," Dr Collins says.
"And reducing your food intake is not going to speed up the process or
compensate for bad foods, and may, in fact, end up doing more harm than
good."

The irony, Collins explains, is that the fasting can actually slow down the
rate of the natural elimination of toxins by the body.

Lowering energy consumption slows down metabolism and reducing or
eliminating protein, found in meat and fish, can slow the function of the
liver. "This is why the physical symptoms of a long-term detox diet are very
similar to someone undertaking a fast."

The physical symptoms of a fast can include headaches, constipation and bad
breath - a result of your body burning muscle.

Many advocates of detoxification diets believe these symptoms are signs that
the body is detoxing, purging itself of poisons - a theory Collins refutes.
"Some religions use fasting as part of their spiritual practice, and over
short periods this is fairly safe."

But while these spiritual fasts - such as Ramadan in Islam and the Jewish
Yom Kippur, allow food to be consumed at certain times with followers
"planning" their intake to avoid hunger - most detox programs advocate 48
hours to seven days of a strict dietary regimen, with some recommending up
to 21 days of restricted eating.

Collins says the most extreme example of a spiritual detox in Australia is
the now infamous Breatharian diet, where a Brisbane woman died after a week
of "consuming" nothing but air.

Lani Morris believed that the black bile she was coughing was a result of
the physical and spiritual cleansing of the 21-day initiation diet that
advocated no food or water for a week and then two weeks of nothing but
orange juice.

Morris, 53, died on July 1, 1999, suffering from pneumonia, dehydration,
kidney failure and stroke. "Once someone is in a fasting state it can become
difficult for them to think rationally," Collins says. "Your electrolytes
become disturbed and you stop thinking rationally; you are easy to control."

People who fast for prolonged periods also face a higher risk of what
Collins calls the "refeeding syndrome". "If you have fasting for a long
period of time, you can't start eating normally because your cell content is
disturbed. If you try and ingest huge amounts of calories you can die,"
Collins says.

Ferraretto agrees with Collins that the psychology of a detox diet can
appeal to people who are already vulnerable to control issues surrounding
food, and that when taken to the extreme - such as in the case of the
Breatharian diet - detox diets can become eating disorders.

The high availability of various detox diets, from books, magazines and the
Internet to alternative medicine practitioners, means people who are
vulnerable to eating disorders can attach themselves to a diet as a way of
controlling their relationship with food.

Earlier this year Ferraretto treated a 15-year-old girl who started on a
detox diet of fruit and vegetables but, after the two-week period of the
diet was up, found herself unable to go back to eating normal food. By the
time she saw Ferraretto, she was exhibiting the physical symptoms of
anorexia nervosa, had vitamin deficiencies, couldn't concentrate at school
and her hair had started to fall out. "She was already vulnerable, and was
prescribed this diet by a natural medicine practitioner," Ferraretto says.

This is a story familiar to Anna Harvey, a support worker in Adelaide for
the Eating Disorder Association, who has seen eating disorder patients
subscribing to bizarre detoxification diets. She recently met a young girl
who had restricted herself to a diet of offal - animal brains and kidneys -
for six weeks after being prescribed it by a naturopath to rehabilitate
supposed deficiencies.

"When this girl came to us she could hardly leave the house and although she
hated what she was eating, she couldn't stand to eat anything else," Harvey
says.

But while the length and content of detox diets varies dramatically, is
there any evidence that the basic detox diet consisting of a fruit and
vegetable "overload" will help you at all?

Trent Watson is a nutritionist from the University of Newcastle studying the
effects of anti-oxidants on the performance of athletes. "A fruit and
vegetable binge will fill your body with anti-oxidants, but how much good
that is going to do you is very questionable," Watson says.

His research has focused on the comparison between anti-oxidants found
naturally in vegetables and those in vitamin supplements, and their
effectiveness in fighting free radicals, oxidants naturally produced by the
body, especially when exercising or in times of stress.

Watson found that excess consumption of double the recommended intake of
fruit and vegetables helped athletes when they were in training, and
producing more free radicals, but had no extra beneficial effect when they
were at rest. "The detox diet operates under the same quick-fix philosophy
as vitamin tablets," he says.

"And whole fruit and vegetables provide anti-oxidants in the best quantities
and combinations possible, and these need to be ingested regularly, five
serves every day. "Having 10 serves a day for a week, and then eating none
for a week, is not the answer."

Watson warns against the idea that anti-oxidants can be made up through
vitamin supplements and says these quick-fix solutions can end up harming
the body.

A study from the US National Cancer Institute in 1994 published in the New
England Journal of Medicine looked at the effects of beta carotene, a
well-known anti-oxidant with cancer-fighting properties, on the incidence of
lung cancer in men. One group of men were (sic) put on a balanced diet high
in fruit and vegetables high in beta-carotene or pro-vitamin A, found in
orange foods such as carrot and sweet potato. The next group was given
beta-carotene supplements and the final group was given a placebo.

Not only did the group with the fruit and vegetable intake get a lower
incidence of cancer, but the group taking the supplements had a higher
incidence of cancer than the placebo group and the trial had to be
terminated.

"Concentrating anti-oxidants in a tablet do not give you the same benefits
as fruit and vegetables because you need the other vitamins found in the
vegetable to get the benefits of the anti-oxidant."

Watson says that so far his research has confirmed that fruit and vegetables
seem to have the anti-oxidants in the right amount and balance for your
body, but that eating a diet of just fruit and vegetables can be as
ineffective as not eating them at all. "Fruit and vegetables need to be part
of a balanced diet," he says. "The anti-oxidants won't work as well if your
metabolism has dropped, because you are not eating adequate amounts of
carbohydrate and protein needed to process the vitamins."

Watson and the dietitian association advocate long-term eating plans that
incorporate the five food groups, with at least five serves of vegetables
(two cups) and two pieces of fruit a day. Most people can make some
improvements by increasing their intake of fruit and vegetables.

The last National Nutrition Survey, taken in 1995, showed that Australians
are only consuming half the recommended intake of fruit and vegetables.

Ferraretto claims that people need to understand that food is not going to
detoxify the body and should stop seeking answers in ready-made solutions.
"Many of the claims made by the now famous liver-cleansing diet are fairly
unsubstantiated," she says. "Your liver, like the rest of your body, does
its job best when you are eating a balanced diet, including carbohydrates
and protein."

Collins says the celebrity status of many detox diets - such as the orange
food diet and the raw food diet - create misconceptions that many foods such
as meat and dairy are loaded with toxins. For many people, it is easy to
believe that "toxins" are responsible for feeling sluggish or for being
overweight.

"Our food supply in the Western world is quite safe. And fruit and
vegetables also contain bac teria that need to be broken down by the body,"
she says. "Most detoxifying diets rest on the myth that you are somehow
flushing the system, and you have to wonder why people feel the need to do
that. "While the minerals and vitamins in fruit and vegetables are
undeniably good for you, they cannot do a better job of cleansing the system
than your liver and your kidneys."

Watson feels that while fad diets capture people's attention, if only for a
short time, it is healthy eating that needs a marketing makeover.

"People are bored with the concept of a balanced diet, but so far it is the
only one that has been shown to make a real impact on long-term health," he
says. "Nutrition isn't rocket science."

-- end article ---

--
jamie )

"There's a seeker born every minute."

  #9  
Old May 28th, 2004, 10:28 PM
Patricia Heil
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Dangers of detox diets (Aus report)

One part of this is what I have posted here before.
Supplements do not necessarily provide benefits when it
comes to anti-oxidants. So taking pills for vitamins
instead of eating your fruit and veggies is not only a waste of money but
can be dangerous.


"jamie" wrote in message
...
Mary wrote:
Just thought some people here may be interested in where to get a good
enema bag Kit
They also have a good enema soap that comes with the bags and a herbal
body detox program that was good


"Detox" marketers are as full of **** as you were.


The Weekend Australian
The dangers of detox diets
By Emily Smith
May 08, 2004

After a Christmas or Easter break the inevitable cry of "I'm detoxing" is
heard around the Western world with people signing up for a two-day or
two-week diet designed to fix all the ills of a long weekend or lifetime

of
poor diet and pollutants. But is detoxing really as effective or safe as
commonly believed?

Dietitians have been fighting the misconceptions surrounding detox diets

for
years and say that not only are the diets ineffective but they can also be
dangerous.

Tania Ferraretto is a privately practising dietitian and spokesperson for
the Dietitians Association of Australia. Dr Ferraretto sees a dozen people

a
year after Christmas who have been on detox diets and says that while
increasing fruit and vegetable intake is desirable for most people,
short-term diets will not affect long-term health.

"They usually come to see me because the diet is not working or having the
effects they expected," she says. "I recently saw a woman, she was in her
30s ,and wanted to lose weight and started on a restricted diet of fruit

and
vegetables. When she came to me, saying that the diet was not working, she
displayed the classic symptoms: tiredness and lethargy, constipation and

bad
breath."

But Ferraretto says while these are relatively mild symptoms, if a diet
involves restricted food intake over a long period more serious conditions
can develop, varying from bowel and respiratory problems to vitamin and
mineral deficiencies.

Many detox diets also prescribe copious amounts of water that can, in
extreme cases, result in water toxicity, or hyponatraemia; when sodium
levels and other body salts, or electrolytes, in the blood are too dilute.

The dangers of hyponatraemia and detoxing were seen in a case in Britain
last year when The Times reported a 23-year-old man going into a coma for
four days after a 21-day detox diet of fruit, vegetables, juice and water.
The lack of sodium combined with at least five litres of water a day

caused
his sodium levels to drop and his brain to swell.

It is easy to see how detoxing can look attractive, in theory. Most detox
diets assert that too much of the wrong sorts of food, a polluted
environment, and unhealthy habits such as drinking and smoking contribute

to
a build-up of poisonous substances in the body.

According to the theories, by adhering to a diet of "pure" foods you will
purge yourself of poisons and undo the damage wreaked on your health. The
purported solution commonly involves drinking two litres or more of water,
accompanied by fruit or vegetable juice and unlimited consumption of raw
fruit and vegetables.

Meat, dairy and starches such as bread or pasta are usually recommended in
small amounts or excluded all together.

However, recent US trials of detox plans at the University of Southern
California found that none of the prominent detox diets, including a

version
of the popular liver-cleansing diet and the fruit-juice diet, lived up to
the claims that they would purge environmental toxins over and above what
the body does naturally.

Clare Collins, a consultant dietitian from the University of Newcastle,

says
that while there is merit in encouraging people to increase their fruit

and
vegetable intake, the misconception is that excluding food groups will

give
the body a rest, or that the body even needs a rest. "Your body detoxes
naturally all the time through the liver and the kidneys," Dr Collins

says.
"And reducing your food intake is not going to speed up the process or
compensate for bad foods, and may, in fact, end up doing more harm than
good."

The irony, Collins explains, is that the fasting can actually slow down

the
rate of the natural elimination of toxins by the body.

Lowering energy consumption slows down metabolism and reducing or
eliminating protein, found in meat and fish, can slow the function of the
liver. "This is why the physical symptoms of a long-term detox diet are

very
similar to someone undertaking a fast."

The physical symptoms of a fast can include headaches, constipation and

bad
breath - a result of your body burning muscle.

Many advocates of detoxification diets believe these symptoms are signs

that
the body is detoxing, purging itself of poisons - a theory Collins

refutes.
"Some religions use fasting as part of their spiritual practice, and over
short periods this is fairly safe."

But while these spiritual fasts - such as Ramadan in Islam and the Jewish
Yom Kippur, allow food to be consumed at certain times with followers
"planning" their intake to avoid hunger - most detox programs advocate 48
hours to seven days of a strict dietary regimen, with some recommending up
to 21 days of restricted eating.

Collins says the most extreme example of a spiritual detox in Australia is
the now infamous Breatharian diet, where a Brisbane woman died after a

week
of "consuming" nothing but air.

Lani Morris believed that the black bile she was coughing was a result of
the physical and spiritual cleansing of the 21-day initiation diet that
advocated no food or water for a week and then two weeks of nothing but
orange juice.

Morris, 53, died on July 1, 1999, suffering from pneumonia, dehydration,
kidney failure and stroke. "Once someone is in a fasting state it can

become
difficult for them to think rationally," Collins says. "Your electrolytes
become disturbed and you stop thinking rationally; you are easy to

control."

People who fast for prolonged periods also face a higher risk of what
Collins calls the "refeeding syndrome". "If you have fasting for a long
period of time, you can't start eating normally because your cell content

is
disturbed. If you try and ingest huge amounts of calories you can die,"
Collins says.

Ferraretto agrees with Collins that the psychology of a detox diet can
appeal to people who are already vulnerable to control issues surrounding
food, and that when taken to the extreme - such as in the case of the
Breatharian diet - detox diets can become eating disorders.

The high availability of various detox diets, from books, magazines and

the
Internet to alternative medicine practitioners, means people who are
vulnerable to eating disorders can attach themselves to a diet as a way of
controlling their relationship with food.

Earlier this year Ferraretto treated a 15-year-old girl who started on a
detox diet of fruit and vegetables but, after the two-week period of the
diet was up, found herself unable to go back to eating normal food. By the
time she saw Ferraretto, she was exhibiting the physical symptoms of
anorexia nervosa, had vitamin deficiencies, couldn't concentrate at school
and her hair had started to fall out. "She was already vulnerable, and was
prescribed this diet by a natural medicine practitioner," Ferraretto says.

This is a story familiar to Anna Harvey, a support worker in Adelaide for
the Eating Disorder Association, who has seen eating disorder patients
subscribing to bizarre detoxification diets. She recently met a young girl
who had restricted herself to a diet of offal - animal brains and

kidneys -
for six weeks after being prescribed it by a naturopath to rehabilitate
supposed deficiencies.

"When this girl came to us she could hardly leave the house and although

she
hated what she was eating, she couldn't stand to eat anything else,"

Harvey
says.

But while the length and content of detox diets varies dramatically, is
there any evidence that the basic detox diet consisting of a fruit and
vegetable "overload" will help you at all?

Trent Watson is a nutritionist from the University of Newcastle studying

the
effects of anti-oxidants on the performance of athletes. "A fruit and
vegetable binge will fill your body with anti-oxidants, but how much good
that is going to do you is very questionable," Watson says.

His research has focused on the comparison between anti-oxidants found
naturally in vegetables and those in vitamin supplements, and their
effectiveness in fighting free radicals, oxidants naturally produced by

the
body, especially when exercising or in times of stress.

Watson found that excess consumption of double the recommended intake of
fruit and vegetables helped athletes when they were in training, and
producing more free radicals, but had no extra beneficial effect when they
were at rest. "The detox diet operates under the same quick-fix philosophy
as vitamin tablets," he says.

"And whole fruit and vegetables provide anti-oxidants in the best

quantities
and combinations possible, and these need to be ingested regularly, five
serves every day. "Having 10 serves a day for a week, and then eating none
for a week, is not the answer."

Watson warns against the idea that anti-oxidants can be made up through
vitamin supplements and says these quick-fix solutions can end up harming
the body.

A study from the US National Cancer Institute in 1994 published in the New
England Journal of Medicine looked at the effects of beta carotene, a
well-known anti-oxidant with cancer-fighting properties, on the incidence

of
lung cancer in men. One group of men were (sic) put on a balanced diet

high
in fruit and vegetables high in beta-carotene or pro-vitamin A, found in
orange foods such as carrot and sweet potato. The next group was given
beta-carotene supplements and the final group was given a placebo.

Not only did the group with the fruit and vegetable intake get a lower
incidence of cancer, but the group taking the supplements had a higher
incidence of cancer than the placebo group and the trial had to be
terminated.

"Concentrating anti-oxidants in a tablet do not give you the same benefits
as fruit and vegetables because you need the other vitamins found in the
vegetable to get the benefits of the anti-oxidant."

Watson says that so far his research has confirmed that fruit and

vegetables
seem to have the anti-oxidants in the right amount and balance for your
body, but that eating a diet of just fruit and vegetables can be as
ineffective as not eating them at all. "Fruit and vegetables need to be

part
of a balanced diet," he says. "The anti-oxidants won't work as well if

your
metabolism has dropped, because you are not eating adequate amounts of
carbohydrate and protein needed to process the vitamins."

Watson and the dietitian association advocate long-term eating plans that
incorporate the five food groups, with at least five serves of vegetables
(two cups) and two pieces of fruit a day. Most people can make some
improvements by increasing their intake of fruit and vegetables.

The last National Nutrition Survey, taken in 1995, showed that Australians
are only consuming half the recommended intake of fruit and vegetables.

Ferraretto claims that people need to understand that food is not going to
detoxify the body and should stop seeking answers in ready-made solutions.
"Many of the claims made by the now famous liver-cleansing diet are fairly
unsubstantiated," she says. "Your liver, like the rest of your body, does
its job best when you are eating a balanced diet, including carbohydrates
and protein."

Collins says the celebrity status of many detox diets - such as the orange
food diet and the raw food diet - create misconceptions that many foods

such
as meat and dairy are loaded with toxins. For many people, it is easy to
believe that "toxins" are responsible for feeling sluggish or for being
overweight.

"Our food supply in the Western world is quite safe. And fruit and
vegetables also contain bac teria that need to be broken down by the

body,"
she says. "Most detoxifying diets rest on the myth that you are somehow
flushing the system, and you have to wonder why people feel the need to do
that. "While the minerals and vitamins in fruit and vegetables are
undeniably good for you, they cannot do a better job of cleansing the

system
than your liver and your kidneys."

Watson feels that while fad diets capture people's attention, if only for

a
short time, it is healthy eating that needs a marketing makeover.

"People are bored with the concept of a balanced diet, but so far it is

the
only one that has been shown to make a real impact on long-term health,"

he
says. "Nutrition isn't rocket science."

-- end article ---

--
jamie )

"There's a seeker born every minute."



 




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