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How Many Exercises and Sets Do I Perform for my Strength Training?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 24th, 2006, 07:52 AM posted to alt.support.diet.weightwatchers
Gary Matthews
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 44
Default How Many Exercises and Sets Do I Perform for my Strength Training?

What if I told you only have a limited amount of energy (readily available)
per strength training session, would you believe me? Well the latest
scientific data and blood tests on individuals under strict gym conditions
have revealed that blood sugar levels drop dramatically after only 20 to 30
minutes during a high intensity strength training session.

So you see you only have a short period of time to complete your strength
training, so exercise selection is crucial for proper results. One way
around this is to use compound multi-joint movements as these offer the most
beneficial muscle stimulation needed for lean muscle growth and metabolism
improvement in the shortest period of time. In other words, we can train
many muscles simultaneously and use our energy more efficiently.

Compound exercises are much more functional and superior to isolation
exercises and promote natural movement of your joints. Heavier loads can
also be lifted using these exercises. Some benefits a

.. More functional
.. Higher muscle activation
.. Higher hormonal release
.. Less stress on joints.

Examples of compound multi-joint movements include squats, bench press,
dips, and chin-ups. Performing three to four exercises with high intensity
during a session are what most people are capable of during a high intensity
strength-training workout. All the main muscle groups are thoroughly
exercised with these exercises and they have an overall growth effect on the
body as a whole i.e. a total body workout.

After rest and recuperation is allowed to take place and at the next
exercise session if you can push out a few more reps then you will have
become stronger, thus allowing for more muscle growth. i.e. more lean muscle
and a higher metabolism.

It only takes one of these workouts to target the entire major support
muscles of the body. Exercises should be chosen from the more complex and
challenging to the less complex and challenging. Remember, as you get
stronger in your upper body exercises i.e. Dips, Bench Press and Lat Pull
downs, you will also add size to your upper arms as well as to your
shoulders. There is no need to train the arms and shoulders with isolation
exercises.

Did you know that current research shows that performing one set per
exercise is as beneficial as multiple set workouts!!

If you think that volume training (multiple sets) is more effective then
you're wrong! The latest research shows that single set training is as
beneficial as multiple set training. Also by performing the one set
decreases the chances of over training and saves valuable energy for other
exercises required during that particular workout.

So all you need to do is ONE SET only of each strength training exercise,
this is accomplished by performing as many repetitions as you possibly can.
Single sets are just as effective as multiple sets in increasing strength,
muscle size and power.

After performing one complete set to total failure, it should be just about
impossible to generate the same force and intensity for another complete set
of the same exercise. If you're able to generate the same force and
intensity for this second set then it is pretty obvious that not enough
effort has been put into the first set. If you give each set per exercise
100% effort (e.g. you cannot move the bar after the last rep) then there
will be no more requirement for further muscle stimulation on that specific
exercise.


Multiple Sets can be used in the following circumstances.

.. The initial stages of learning a new exercise.

.. During rehabilitation


Remember it is the intensity that is important, not the volume when it comes
to gains in strength. One warm up set of 50% of maximal weight can be done
for 5-10 repetitions to oil the joints for the big work set that is to
follow. After completing a set and when your breathing has returned to
normal proceed to the next exercise. There is no time limit here just what
you feel comfortable with, be it 3 or 5 minutes etc.

Make no mistake about it put what you have leaned here to practice and you
will start to finally make those long awaited gains you have been after.
http://www.maximumfitness.com/news.php


  #2  
Old July 26th, 2006, 10:31 PM posted to alt.support.diet.weightwatchers
rmr
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default How Many Exercises and Sets Do I Perform for my Strength Training?

On Mon, 24 Jul 2006 16:52:51 +1000, "Gary Matthews"
[email protected] wrote:

snip

Compound exercises are much more functional and superior to isolation
exercises and promote natural movement of your joints. Heavier loads can
also be lifted using these exercises. Some benefits a

. More functional
. Higher muscle activation
. Higher hormonal release
. Less stress on joints.



Yes. Compund exercises are the way to go. Squat, deadlift, bench,
chin-up, dip, and a few others.

snip Performing three to four exercises with high intensity
during a session are what most people are capable of during a high intensity
strength-training workout. All the main muscle groups are thoroughly
exercised with these exercises and they have an overall growth effect on the
body as a whole i.e. a total body workout.

After rest and recuperation is allowed to take place and at the next
exercise session if you can push out a few more reps then you will have
become stronger, thus allowing for more muscle growth. i.e. more lean muscle
and a higher metabolism.

It only takes one of these workouts to target the entire major support
muscles of the body. Exercises should be chosen from the more complex and
challenging to the less complex and challenging. Remember, as you get
stronger in your upper body exercises i.e. Dips, Bench Press and Lat Pull
downs, you will also add size to your upper arms as well as to your
shoulders. There is no need to train the arms and shoulders with isolation
exercises.

Did you know that current research shows that performing one set per
exercise is as beneficial as multiple set workouts!!


Not really. You must do one or two warmup sets of each exercise first
then a minimum of one challenging set. There's not much return on
doing more than three, except that you will expend more energy.

Really it depends on your goal. If you are looking for endurance then
do more lighter and longer sets. If you are looking for maximum
strength, then go for a few shorter, heavier sets.

If you think that volume training (multiple sets) is more effective then
you're wrong! The latest research shows that single set training is as
beneficial as multiple set training. Also by performing the one set
decreases the chances of over training and saves valuable energy for other
exercises required during that particular workout.


This is not the case. Especially since you are advocating one set to
failure. That is a guarantee of injuring yourself. You should adjust
the weight to do 5-15 reps per set and still have enough strength to
do one more rep. You should never lift to failure.

So all you need to do is ONE SET only of each strength training exercise,
this is accomplished by performing as many repetitions as you possibly can.


After performing one complete set to total failure, it should be just about
impossible to generate the same force and intensity for another complete set
of the same exercise. If you're able to generate the same force and
intensity for this second set then it is pretty obvious that not enough
effort has been put into the first set. If you give each set per exercise
100% effort (e.g. you cannot move the bar after the last rep) then there
will be no more requirement for further muscle stimulation on that specific
exercise.


NO. This is really bad advice. NEVER lift to failure. You will injure
yourself. Can you imagine a newby trying tto squat to failure. recipe
for a broken back. Or trying a bench press to failure - broken neck!

DONT DO IT.

Multiple Sets can be used in the following circumstances.

. The initial stages of learning a new exercise.

. During rehabilitation


Definately.

Remember it is the intensity that is important, not the volume when it comes
to gains in strength. One warm up set of 50% of maximal weight can be done
for 5-10 repetitions to oil the joints for the big work set that is to
follow. After completing a set and when your breathing has returned to
normal proceed to the next exercise. There is no time limit here just what
you feel comfortable with, be it 3 or 5 minutes etc.


again it depends on your goals.

Make no mistake about it put what you have leaned here to practice and you
will start to finally make those long awaited gains you have been after.
snip url


Use google to get advice from several different sources and go with
those who make the best case. But be conservative in what you do.
Lifting weights can be dangerous. Above all be careful and always
underestimate how much you can lift.

ps. Isolation exercises can be useful too. You should generally do
isolation exercises at the end after doing the compound exercises. But
you should have a good reason for doing isolation exercises. I
generally do a few isolation exercise to make a session up to an hour.

Ray
  #3  
Old July 26th, 2006, 11:08 PM posted to alt.support.diet.weightwatchers
Nunya B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 617
Default How Many Exercises and Sets Do I Perform for my Strength Training?


"rmr" wrote in message
...

NO. This is really bad advice. NEVER lift to failure. You will injure
yourself. Can you imagine a newby trying tto squat to failure. recipe
for a broken back. Or trying a bench press to failure - broken neck!

DONT DO IT.


How about qualifying this with never do it unless you are an experienced
weightlifter? With the exception of my shoulders and scapular area, I
almost always work to failure and have been for years while under the
tutelage of a very experienced personal trainer.

I'd say never do it until you've been working out a long time, are sure you
have correct form, and in most cases someone around to spot you.


--
the volleyballchick


  #4  
Old July 27th, 2006, 03:57 PM posted to alt.support.diet.weightwatchers
Willow Herself
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,889
Default How Many Exercises and Sets Do I Perform for my Strength Training?


"Nunya B." wrote in message
...

"rmr" wrote in message
...

NO. This is really bad advice. NEVER lift to failure. You will injure
yourself. Can you imagine a newby trying tto squat to failure. recipe
for a broken back. Or trying a bench press to failure - broken neck!

DONT DO IT.


How about qualifying this with never do it unless you are an experienced
weightlifter? With the exception of my shoulders and scapular area, I
almost always work to failure and have been for years while under the
tutelage of a very experienced personal trainer.

I'd say never do it until you've been working out a long time, are sure
you have correct form, and in most cases someone around to spot you.


--
the volleyballchick


What's the goal there though? What do you get out of it that you wouldn't by
working to "near failure"?

Not doubting your word, but I don't see why one would risk it. Like Ray I
always read/was told that it's dangerous and not worth it.. I'm open to
learn though.. ;o)

I agree with you about this though... 1- Make sure you've done it long
enough to where you know what you're doing.. forms forms forms forms!!!!!

2- have a spotter... if not someone who's with you (buddy, trainer) ask
somebody in the gym... 99% of lifters will be more than happy to spot you.

I've found a load of information, ideas, motivation, kick in the behind in
Mistress Krista's website. http://www.stumptuous.com/cms/index.php

I know everybody knows about that website... but if you don't READ!!

Will~


  #5  
Old July 27th, 2006, 04:37 PM posted to alt.support.diet.weightwatchers
Nunya B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 617
Default How Many Exercises and Sets Do I Perform for my Strength Training?


"Willow Herself" wrote in
message ...

"Nunya B." wrote in message
...

"rmr" wrote in message
...

NO. This is really bad advice. NEVER lift to failure. You will injure
yourself. Can you imagine a newby trying tto squat to failure. recipe
for a broken back. Or trying a bench press to failure - broken neck!

DONT DO IT.


How about qualifying this with never do it unless you are an experienced
weightlifter? With the exception of my shoulders and scapular area, I
almost always work to failure and have been for years while under the
tutelage of a very experienced personal trainer.

I'd say never do it until you've been working out a long time, are sure
you have correct form, and in most cases someone around to spot you.


--
the volleyballchick


What's the goal there though? What do you get out of it that you wouldn't
by working to "near failure"?


When doing power lifting, like when I was training for competition, you do
want work at your max by the last set - the object being to engage as many
power units in the muscles as possible.

Not doubting your word, but I don't see why one would risk it. Like Ray I
always read/was told that it's dangerous and not worth it.. I'm open to
learn though.. ;o)


I haven't done much reading on it because I have had an excellent trainer
with more than 30 years of experience and some great experienced older
lifters (both male and female). I think that since they're all lifting well
into their 50's, 60's, (and 70's in one case), they know what they're doing.

Like dieting, there are few absolutes in weightlifting. I've seen some guys
do things I wouldn't imagine doing. OTOH there's some guy on another
newsgroup that claims the Smith machine is dangerous and should never be
used. There are all kinds of "myths" out there.

--
the volleyballchick


  #6  
Old July 27th, 2006, 07:04 PM posted to alt.support.diet.weightwatchers
Willow Herself
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,889
Default How Many Exercises and Sets Do I Perform for my Strength Training?


"Nunya B." wrote in message
...

"Willow Herself" wrote in
message ...

"Nunya B." wrote in message
...

"rmr" wrote in message
...

NO. This is really bad advice. NEVER lift to failure. You will injure
yourself. Can you imagine a newby trying tto squat to failure. recipe
for a broken back. Or trying a bench press to failure - broken neck!

DONT DO IT.

How about qualifying this with never do it unless you are an experienced
weightlifter? With the exception of my shoulders and scapular area, I
almost always work to failure and have been for years while under the
tutelage of a very experienced personal trainer.

I'd say never do it until you've been working out a long time, are sure
you have correct form, and in most cases someone around to spot you.


--
the volleyballchick


What's the goal there though? What do you get out of it that you wouldn't
by working to "near failure"?


When doing power lifting, like when I was training for competition, you do
want work at your max by the last set - the object being to engage as many
power units in the muscles as possible.

Not doubting your word, but I don't see why one would risk it. Like Ray I
always read/was told that it's dangerous and not worth it.. I'm open to
learn though.. ;o)


I haven't done much reading on it because I have had an excellent trainer
with more than 30 years of experience and some great experienced older
lifters (both male and female). I think that since they're all lifting
well into their 50's, 60's, (and 70's in one case), they know what they're
doing.

Like dieting, there are few absolutes in weightlifting. I've seen some
guys do things I wouldn't imagine doing. OTOH there's some guy on another
newsgroup that claims the Smith machine is dangerous and should never be
used. There are all kinds of "myths" out there.

--
the volleyballchick


I know, believe me.. that's why I ask, I read a lot and research a lot
(since I can't afford a trainer) and I'm still trying to wade through what's
real and what's bull...

Will~


  #7  
Old July 28th, 2006, 12:29 AM posted to alt.support.diet.weightwatchers
Eddie-Type2
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 531
Default How Many Exercises and Sets Do I Perform for my Strength Training?

Hey Ray,

I think you probably know that I've also been lifting weights since January.

If you don't mind, can you please share your routine...........I'm really
curious to know what you're doing because in my case, I am pushing heavy
weights for 3 sets each and I'm also superset.

I start out with the Bench Press
135x10
155x8
175x6
Sometimes, I will try to push a 4th set at 190 with someone spotting
me......

But I superset the bench press with straight barbell curls
40x10
50x8
60x6

Then I do a 3rd superset for my triceps with overhead dumbbell tri
extensions
35x10
35x10
35x10

After those 9 sets, I then do 3 sets of alternating dumbbell curls
15x10
20x10
25x10

Then I do preacher curls superset with overhead preacher bar tri extensions
55x10 curl, then 55x10 O/H tri ext (some people call them head crushers!)

On alternate days, I do bent over dumbbell lifts/row
40x10, 3 sets superset each arm

I recently started doing squats with the smith machine - what a killer!!!!!!
my thighs feel like some too a baseball bat to them!! hehehe
But I hear squats are also very good for cardio as well - I hate the
treadmill and bike, but I still fit them in on alternate days........

I try to change my routine so that it doesn't get stale.........in time,
when I lose another 100lbs, I plan to show off all my huge muscles with my
ultimate goal of walking on the beach wearing a Speedo!!!
hehehehahahaha!!!!!! the girls at my WW meeting just love it when I say that
grin

Eddie
Weight June05-359.0lbs
Current Weight-291.8lbs
Loss to date=67.2lbs
Goal Weight-180.0lbs

"rmr" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 24 Jul 2006 16:52:51 +1000, "Gary Matthews"
[email protected] wrote:

snip

Compound exercises are much more functional and superior to isolation
exercises and promote natural movement of your joints. Heavier loads can
also be lifted using these exercises. Some benefits a

. More functional
. Higher muscle activation
. Higher hormonal release
. Less stress on joints.



Yes. Compund exercises are the way to go. Squat, deadlift, bench,
chin-up, dip, and a few others.

snip Performing three to four exercises with high intensity
during a session are what most people are capable of during a high

intensity
strength-training workout. All the main muscle groups are thoroughly
exercised with these exercises and they have an overall growth effect on

the
body as a whole i.e. a total body workout.

After rest and recuperation is allowed to take place and at the next
exercise session if you can push out a few more reps then you will have
become stronger, thus allowing for more muscle growth. i.e. more lean

muscle
and a higher metabolism.

It only takes one of these workouts to target the entire major support
muscles of the body. Exercises should be chosen from the more complex and
challenging to the less complex and challenging. Remember, as you get
stronger in your upper body exercises i.e. Dips, Bench Press and Lat Pull
downs, you will also add size to your upper arms as well as to your
shoulders. There is no need to train the arms and shoulders with isolation
exercises.

Did you know that current research shows that performing one set per
exercise is as beneficial as multiple set workouts!!


Not really. You must do one or two warmup sets of each exercise first
then a minimum of one challenging set. There's not much return on
doing more than three, except that you will expend more energy.

Really it depends on your goal. If you are looking for endurance then
do more lighter and longer sets. If you are looking for maximum
strength, then go for a few shorter, heavier sets.

If you think that volume training (multiple sets) is more effective then
you're wrong! The latest research shows that single set training is as
beneficial as multiple set training. Also by performing the one set
decreases the chances of over training and saves valuable energy for other
exercises required during that particular workout.


This is not the case. Especially since you are advocating one set to
failure. That is a guarantee of injuring yourself. You should adjust
the weight to do 5-15 reps per set and still have enough strength to
do one more rep. You should never lift to failure.

So all you need to do is ONE SET only of each strength training exercise,
this is accomplished by performing as many repetitions as you possibly can.


After performing one complete set to total failure, it should be just about
impossible to generate the same force and intensity for another complete

set
of the same exercise. If you're able to generate the same force and
intensity for this second set then it is pretty obvious that not enough
effort has been put into the first set. If you give each set per exercise
100% effort (e.g. you cannot move the bar after the last rep) then there
will be no more requirement for further muscle stimulation on that specific
exercise.


NO. This is really bad advice. NEVER lift to failure. You will injure
yourself. Can you imagine a newby trying tto squat to failure. recipe
for a broken back. Or trying a bench press to failure - broken neck!

DONT DO IT.

Multiple Sets can be used in the following circumstances.

. The initial stages of learning a new exercise.

. During rehabilitation


Definately.

Remember it is the intensity that is important, not the volume when it

comes
to gains in strength. One warm up set of 50% of maximal weight can be done
for 5-10 repetitions to oil the joints for the big work set that is to
follow. After completing a set and when your breathing has returned to
normal proceed to the next exercise. There is no time limit here just what
you feel comfortable with, be it 3 or 5 minutes etc.


again it depends on your goals.

Make no mistake about it put what you have leaned here to practice and you
will start to finally make those long awaited gains you have been after.
snip url


Use google to get advice from several different sources and go with
those who make the best case. But be conservative in what you do.
Lifting weights can be dangerous. Above all be careful and always
underestimate how much you can lift.

ps. Isolation exercises can be useful too. You should generally do
isolation exercises at the end after doing the compound exercises. But
you should have a good reason for doing isolation exercises. I
generally do a few isolation exercise to make a session up to an hour.

Ray


  #8  
Old July 28th, 2006, 06:23 PM posted to alt.support.diet.weightwatchers
Nunya B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 617
Default How Many Exercises and Sets Do I Perform for my Strength Training?

Eddie,

Looks like your workout is very arm intensive. What are you doing for your
traps, shoulders, and lats besides the alternating dumbell rows?

Take a look at this site: http://www.exrx.net/Exercise.html for some ideas
on how to hit those other groups.

Everyone is different in their weightlifting, but an overall good thing is
to think about the specific muscle groups you're trying to hit and do it. I
do full body twice a week due to time constraints. Some do upper one day,
lower the next. My workout is generally geared from the neck down. This
means I get to the gym and figure out what I'm going to do for my traps,
then do the pecs, etc. and I work on big muscles before the small ones so I
save my shoulder specific and arm specific exercises until after the pecs
and lats. Totally not a requirement by any means, it's just the habit I've
gotten into. It's an efficiency thing

Smith squats are great in that they take the need for balancing out of the
equation - you probably won't fall over like you could with regular squats.
Just make sure your legs are in the correct position and that your your form
is spot on or else you can cause shearing in the knee.
--
the volleyballchick

"Eddie-Type2" wrote in message
...
Hey Ray,

I think you probably know that I've also been lifting weights since
January.

If you don't mind, can you please share your routine...........I'm really
curious to know what you're doing because in my case, I am pushing heavy
weights for 3 sets each and I'm also superset.

I start out with the Bench Press
135x10
155x8
175x6
Sometimes, I will try to push a 4th set at 190 with someone spotting
me......

But I superset the bench press with straight barbell curls
40x10
50x8
60x6

Then I do a 3rd superset for my triceps with overhead dumbbell tri
extensions
35x10
35x10
35x10

After those 9 sets, I then do 3 sets of alternating dumbbell curls
15x10
20x10
25x10

Then I do preacher curls superset with overhead preacher bar tri
extensions
55x10 curl, then 55x10 O/H tri ext (some people call them head crushers!)

On alternate days, I do bent over dumbbell lifts/row
40x10, 3 sets superset each arm

I recently started doing squats with the smith machine - what a
killer!!!!!!
my thighs feel like some too a baseball bat to them!! hehehe
But I hear squats are also very good for cardio as well - I hate the
treadmill and bike, but I still fit them in on alternate days........

I try to change my routine so that it doesn't get stale.........in time,
when I lose another 100lbs, I plan to show off all my huge muscles with my
ultimate goal of walking on the beach wearing a Speedo!!!
hehehehahahaha!!!!!! the girls at my WW meeting just love it when I say
that
grin

Eddie
Weight June05-359.0lbs
Current Weight-291.8lbs
Loss to date=67.2lbs
Goal Weight-180.0lbs

"rmr" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 24 Jul 2006 16:52:51 +1000, "Gary Matthews"
[email protected] wrote:

snip

Compound exercises are much more functional and superior to isolation
exercises and promote natural movement of your joints. Heavier loads can
also be lifted using these exercises. Some benefits a

. More functional
. Higher muscle activation
. Higher hormonal release
. Less stress on joints.



Yes. Compund exercises are the way to go. Squat, deadlift, bench,
chin-up, dip, and a few others.

snip Performing three to four exercises with high intensity
during a session are what most people are capable of during a high

intensity
strength-training workout. All the main muscle groups are thoroughly
exercised with these exercises and they have an overall growth effect on

the
body as a whole i.e. a total body workout.

After rest and recuperation is allowed to take place and at the next
exercise session if you can push out a few more reps then you will have
become stronger, thus allowing for more muscle growth. i.e. more lean

muscle
and a higher metabolism.

It only takes one of these workouts to target the entire major support
muscles of the body. Exercises should be chosen from the more complex and
challenging to the less complex and challenging. Remember, as you get
stronger in your upper body exercises i.e. Dips, Bench Press and Lat Pull
downs, you will also add size to your upper arms as well as to your
shoulders. There is no need to train the arms and shoulders with isolation
exercises.

Did you know that current research shows that performing one set per
exercise is as beneficial as multiple set workouts!!


Not really. You must do one or two warmup sets of each exercise first
then a minimum of one challenging set. There's not much return on
doing more than three, except that you will expend more energy.

Really it depends on your goal. If you are looking for endurance then
do more lighter and longer sets. If you are looking for maximum
strength, then go for a few shorter, heavier sets.

If you think that volume training (multiple sets) is more effective then
you're wrong! The latest research shows that single set training is as
beneficial as multiple set training. Also by performing the one set
decreases the chances of over training and saves valuable energy for other
exercises required during that particular workout.


This is not the case. Especially since you are advocating one set to
failure. That is a guarantee of injuring yourself. You should adjust
the weight to do 5-15 reps per set and still have enough strength to
do one more rep. You should never lift to failure.

So all you need to do is ONE SET only of each strength training exercise,
this is accomplished by performing as many repetitions as you possibly
can.


After performing one complete set to total failure, it should be just
about
impossible to generate the same force and intensity for another complete

set
of the same exercise. If you're able to generate the same force and
intensity for this second set then it is pretty obvious that not enough
effort has been put into the first set. If you give each set per exercise
100% effort (e.g. you cannot move the bar after the last rep) then there
will be no more requirement for further muscle stimulation on that
specific
exercise.


NO. This is really bad advice. NEVER lift to failure. You will injure
yourself. Can you imagine a newby trying tto squat to failure. recipe
for a broken back. Or trying a bench press to failure - broken neck!

DONT DO IT.

Multiple Sets can be used in the following circumstances.

. The initial stages of learning a new exercise.

. During rehabilitation


Definately.

Remember it is the intensity that is important, not the volume when it

comes
to gains in strength. One warm up set of 50% of maximal weight can be done
for 5-10 repetitions to oil the joints for the big work set that is to
follow. After completing a set and when your breathing has returned to
normal proceed to the next exercise. There is no time limit here just what
you feel comfortable with, be it 3 or 5 minutes etc.


again it depends on your goals.

Make no mistake about it put what you have leaned here to practice and you
will start to finally make those long awaited gains you have been after.
snip url


Use google to get advice from several different sources and go with
those who make the best case. But be conservative in what you do.
Lifting weights can be dangerous. Above all be careful and always
underestimate how much you can lift.

ps. Isolation exercises can be useful too. You should generally do
isolation exercises at the end after doing the compound exercises. But
you should have a good reason for doing isolation exercises. I
generally do a few isolation exercise to make a session up to an hour.

Ray




  #9  
Old July 28th, 2006, 07:03 PM posted to alt.support.diet.weightwatchers
Eddie-Type2
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 531
Default How Many Exercises and Sets Do I Perform for my Strength Training?

I have been using machines to target my lats, shoulders, abs and legs, but I
don't enjoy them as much as the free weights. I try to alternate my
workouts and mix things up. I recently started doing sitting dumbbell
shoulder presses use 2-25lbs abd I plan on continuing with that. I don't
work my lower body much because having been over 300 lbs for the last 5
years, my legs are in pretty good shape - as time goes on, I plan to start
working more on them, but right now I am simply doing the leg press one a
week and walking on the treadmill 3 times a week. I also do many stretching
exercises - people are amazed at how flexible I am for a short little fat
guy! LOL!

Eddie
Weight June05-359.0lbs
Current Weight-291.8lbs
Loss to date=67.2lbs
Goal Weight-180.0lbs

"Nunya B." wrote in message
...
Eddie,

Looks like your workout is very arm intensive. What are you doing for your
traps, shoulders, and lats besides the alternating dumbell rows?

Take a look at this site: http://www.exrx.net/Exercise.html for some ideas
on how to hit those other groups.

Everyone is different in their weightlifting, but an overall good thing is
to think about the specific muscle groups you're trying to hit and do it. I
do full body twice a week due to time constraints. Some do upper one day,
lower the next. My workout is generally geared from the neck down. This
means I get to the gym and figure out what I'm going to do for my traps,
then do the pecs, etc. and I work on big muscles before the small ones so I
save my shoulder specific and arm specific exercises until after the pecs
and lats. Totally not a requirement by any means, it's just the habit I've
gotten into. It's an efficiency thing

Smith squats are great in that they take the need for balancing out of the
equation - you probably won't fall over like you could with regular squats.
Just make sure your legs are in the correct position and that your your form
is spot on or else you can cause shearing in the knee.
--
the volleyballchick

"Eddie-Type2" wrote in message
...
Hey Ray,

I think you probably know that I've also been lifting weights since
January.

If you don't mind, can you please share your routine...........I'm really
curious to know what you're doing because in my case, I am pushing heavy
weights for 3 sets each and I'm also superset.

I start out with the Bench Press
135x10
155x8
175x6
Sometimes, I will try to push a 4th set at 190 with someone spotting
me......

But I superset the bench press with straight barbell curls
40x10
50x8
60x6

Then I do a 3rd superset for my triceps with overhead dumbbell tri
extensions
35x10
35x10
35x10

After those 9 sets, I then do 3 sets of alternating dumbbell curls
15x10
20x10
25x10

Then I do preacher curls superset with overhead preacher bar tri
extensions
55x10 curl, then 55x10 O/H tri ext (some people call them head crushers!)

On alternate days, I do bent over dumbbell lifts/row
40x10, 3 sets superset each arm

I recently started doing squats with the smith machine - what a
killer!!!!!!
my thighs feel like some too a baseball bat to them!! hehehe
But I hear squats are also very good for cardio as well - I hate the
treadmill and bike, but I still fit them in on alternate days........

I try to change my routine so that it doesn't get stale.........in time,
when I lose another 100lbs, I plan to show off all my huge muscles with my
ultimate goal of walking on the beach wearing a Speedo!!!
hehehehahahaha!!!!!! the girls at my WW meeting just love it when I say
that
grin

Eddie
Weight June05-359.0lbs
Current Weight-291.8lbs
Loss to date=67.2lbs
Goal Weight-180.0lbs

"rmr" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 24 Jul 2006 16:52:51 +1000, "Gary Matthews"
[email protected] wrote:

snip

Compound exercises are much more functional and superior to isolation
exercises and promote natural movement of your joints. Heavier loads can
also be lifted using these exercises. Some benefits a

. More functional
. Higher muscle activation
. Higher hormonal release
. Less stress on joints.



Yes. Compund exercises are the way to go. Squat, deadlift, bench,
chin-up, dip, and a few others.

snip Performing three to four exercises with high intensity
during a session are what most people are capable of during a high

intensity
strength-training workout. All the main muscle groups are thoroughly
exercised with these exercises and they have an overall growth effect on

the
body as a whole i.e. a total body workout.

After rest and recuperation is allowed to take place and at the next
exercise session if you can push out a few more reps then you will have
become stronger, thus allowing for more muscle growth. i.e. more lean

muscle
and a higher metabolism.

It only takes one of these workouts to target the entire major support
muscles of the body. Exercises should be chosen from the more complex and
challenging to the less complex and challenging. Remember, as you get
stronger in your upper body exercises i.e. Dips, Bench Press and Lat Pull
downs, you will also add size to your upper arms as well as to your
shoulders. There is no need to train the arms and shoulders with isolation
exercises.

Did you know that current research shows that performing one set per
exercise is as beneficial as multiple set workouts!!


Not really. You must do one or two warmup sets of each exercise first
then a minimum of one challenging set. There's not much return on
doing more than three, except that you will expend more energy.

Really it depends on your goal. If you are looking for endurance then
do more lighter and longer sets. If you are looking for maximum
strength, then go for a few shorter, heavier sets.

If you think that volume training (multiple sets) is more effective then
you're wrong! The latest research shows that single set training is as
beneficial as multiple set training. Also by performing the one set
decreases the chances of over training and saves valuable energy for other
exercises required during that particular workout.


This is not the case. Especially since you are advocating one set to
failure. That is a guarantee of injuring yourself. You should adjust
the weight to do 5-15 reps per set and still have enough strength to
do one more rep. You should never lift to failure.

So all you need to do is ONE SET only of each strength training exercise,
this is accomplished by performing as many repetitions as you possibly
can.


After performing one complete set to total failure, it should be just
about
impossible to generate the same force and intensity for another complete

set
of the same exercise. If you're able to generate the same force and
intensity for this second set then it is pretty obvious that not enough
effort has been put into the first set. If you give each set per exercise
100% effort (e.g. you cannot move the bar after the last rep) then there
will be no more requirement for further muscle stimulation on that
specific
exercise.


NO. This is really bad advice. NEVER lift to failure. You will injure
yourself. Can you imagine a newby trying tto squat to failure. recipe
for a broken back. Or trying a bench press to failure - broken neck!

DONT DO IT.

Multiple Sets can be used in the following circumstances.

. The initial stages of learning a new exercise.

. During rehabilitation


Definately.

Remember it is the intensity that is important, not the volume when it

comes
to gains in strength. One warm up set of 50% of maximal weight can be done
for 5-10 repetitions to oil the joints for the big work set that is to
follow. After completing a set and when your breathing has returned to
normal proceed to the next exercise. There is no time limit here just what
you feel comfortable with, be it 3 or 5 minutes etc.


again it depends on your goals.

Make no mistake about it put what you have leaned here to practice and you
will start to finally make those long awaited gains you have been after.
snip url


Use google to get advice from several different sources and go with
those who make the best case. But be conservative in what you do.
Lifting weights can be dangerous. Above all be careful and always
underestimate how much you can lift.

ps. Isolation exercises can be useful too. You should generally do
isolation exercises at the end after doing the compound exercises. But
you should have a good reason for doing isolation exercises. I
generally do a few isolation exercise to make a session up to an hour.

Ray





  #10  
Old July 28th, 2006, 09:08 PM posted to alt.support.diet.weightwatchers
Nunya B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 617
Default How Many Exercises and Sets Do I Perform for my Strength Training?

That website I gave you has exercises using machines, dumbbells, olympic
bars, bodyweight, you name it. It's great.

I'd work the legs more than once a week, but if you're doing smith squats
one day and leg press another that's great and no need to do much more.
Remember that the quads and glutes are huge muscles and working them burns
more calories than working say the triceps (though it's important to do
those too). In a resting state it takes more energy (calories) to sustain
those muscles so it's good to keep them in shape. Walking on the treadmill
doesn't do anything to build or maintain leg strength though it's a fabulous
thing to do anyway. I was in the same position, over 300 lbs when I started
and now I can leg press 4x my body weight.

Continuing to push yourself will help maintain muscle mass as you lose
weight. Yep, you're going to lose some strength - I was kind of bummed at
the decrease in some of my upper body stuff, but I started looking at it as
a percentage of overall body weight and felt better about it.
--
the volleyballchick

"Eddie-Type2" wrote in message
...
I have been using machines to target my lats, shoulders, abs and legs, but
I
don't enjoy them as much as the free weights. I try to alternate my
workouts and mix things up. I recently started doing sitting dumbbell
shoulder presses use 2-25lbs abd I plan on continuing with that. I don't
work my lower body much because having been over 300 lbs for the last 5
years, my legs are in pretty good shape - as time goes on, I plan to start
working more on them, but right now I am simply doing the leg press one a
week and walking on the treadmill 3 times a week. I also do many
stretching
exercises - people are amazed at how flexible I am for a short little fat
guy! LOL!

Eddie
Weight June05-359.0lbs
Current Weight-291.8lbs
Loss to date=67.2lbs
Goal Weight-180.0lbs

"Nunya B." wrote in message
...
Eddie,

Looks like your workout is very arm intensive. What are you doing for
your
traps, shoulders, and lats besides the alternating dumbell rows?

Take a look at this site: http://www.exrx.net/Exercise.html for some ideas
on how to hit those other groups.

Everyone is different in their weightlifting, but an overall good thing is
to think about the specific muscle groups you're trying to hit and do it.
I
do full body twice a week due to time constraints. Some do upper one day,
lower the next. My workout is generally geared from the neck down. This
means I get to the gym and figure out what I'm going to do for my traps,
then do the pecs, etc. and I work on big muscles before the small ones so
I
save my shoulder specific and arm specific exercises until after the pecs
and lats. Totally not a requirement by any means, it's just the habit
I've
gotten into. It's an efficiency thing

Smith squats are great in that they take the need for balancing out of the
equation - you probably won't fall over like you could with regular
squats.
Just make sure your legs are in the correct position and that your your
form
is spot on or else you can cause shearing in the knee.
--
the volleyballchick

"Eddie-Type2" wrote in message
...
Hey Ray,

I think you probably know that I've also been lifting weights since
January.

If you don't mind, can you please share your routine...........I'm really
curious to know what you're doing because in my case, I am pushing heavy
weights for 3 sets each and I'm also superset.

I start out with the Bench Press
135x10
155x8
175x6
Sometimes, I will try to push a 4th set at 190 with someone spotting
me......

But I superset the bench press with straight barbell curls
40x10
50x8
60x6

Then I do a 3rd superset for my triceps with overhead dumbbell tri
extensions
35x10
35x10
35x10

After those 9 sets, I then do 3 sets of alternating dumbbell curls
15x10
20x10
25x10

Then I do preacher curls superset with overhead preacher bar tri
extensions
55x10 curl, then 55x10 O/H tri ext (some people call them head crushers!)

On alternate days, I do bent over dumbbell lifts/row
40x10, 3 sets superset each arm

I recently started doing squats with the smith machine - what a
killer!!!!!!
my thighs feel like some too a baseball bat to them!! hehehe
But I hear squats are also very good for cardio as well - I hate the
treadmill and bike, but I still fit them in on alternate days........

I try to change my routine so that it doesn't get stale.........in time,
when I lose another 100lbs, I plan to show off all my huge muscles with
my
ultimate goal of walking on the beach wearing a Speedo!!!
hehehehahahaha!!!!!! the girls at my WW meeting just love it when I say
that
grin

Eddie
Weight June05-359.0lbs
Current Weight-291.8lbs
Loss to date=67.2lbs
Goal Weight-180.0lbs

"rmr" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 24 Jul 2006 16:52:51 +1000, "Gary Matthews"
[email protected] wrote:

snip

Compound exercises are much more functional and superior to isolation
exercises and promote natural movement of your joints. Heavier loads can
also be lifted using these exercises. Some benefits a

. More functional
. Higher muscle activation
. Higher hormonal release
. Less stress on joints.



Yes. Compund exercises are the way to go. Squat, deadlift, bench,
chin-up, dip, and a few others.

snip Performing three to four exercises with high intensity
during a session are what most people are capable of during a high

intensity
strength-training workout. All the main muscle groups are thoroughly
exercised with these exercises and they have an overall growth effect on

the
body as a whole i.e. a total body workout.

After rest and recuperation is allowed to take place and at the next
exercise session if you can push out a few more reps then you will have
become stronger, thus allowing for more muscle growth. i.e. more lean

muscle
and a higher metabolism.

It only takes one of these workouts to target the entire major support
muscles of the body. Exercises should be chosen from the more complex and
challenging to the less complex and challenging. Remember, as you get
stronger in your upper body exercises i.e. Dips, Bench Press and Lat Pull
downs, you will also add size to your upper arms as well as to your
shoulders. There is no need to train the arms and shoulders with
isolation
exercises.

Did you know that current research shows that performing one set per
exercise is as beneficial as multiple set workouts!!


Not really. You must do one or two warmup sets of each exercise first
then a minimum of one challenging set. There's not much return on
doing more than three, except that you will expend more energy.

Really it depends on your goal. If you are looking for endurance then
do more lighter and longer sets. If you are looking for maximum
strength, then go for a few shorter, heavier sets.

If you think that volume training (multiple sets) is more effective then
you're wrong! The latest research shows that single set training is as
beneficial as multiple set training. Also by performing the one set
decreases the chances of over training and saves valuable energy for
other
exercises required during that particular workout.


This is not the case. Especially since you are advocating one set to
failure. That is a guarantee of injuring yourself. You should adjust
the weight to do 5-15 reps per set and still have enough strength to
do one more rep. You should never lift to failure.

So all you need to do is ONE SET only of each strength training exercise,
this is accomplished by performing as many repetitions as you possibly
can.


After performing one complete set to total failure, it should be just
about
impossible to generate the same force and intensity for another complete

set
of the same exercise. If you're able to generate the same force and
intensity for this second set then it is pretty obvious that not enough
effort has been put into the first set. If you give each set per exercise
100% effort (e.g. you cannot move the bar after the last rep) then there
will be no more requirement for further muscle stimulation on that
specific
exercise.


NO. This is really bad advice. NEVER lift to failure. You will injure
yourself. Can you imagine a newby trying tto squat to failure. recipe
for a broken back. Or trying a bench press to failure - broken neck!

DONT DO IT.

Multiple Sets can be used in the following circumstances.

. The initial stages of learning a new exercise.

. During rehabilitation


Definately.

Remember it is the intensity that is important, not the volume when it

comes
to gains in strength. One warm up set of 50% of maximal weight can be
done
for 5-10 repetitions to oil the joints for the big work set that is to
follow. After completing a set and when your breathing has returned to
normal proceed to the next exercise. There is no time limit here just
what
you feel comfortable with, be it 3 or 5 minutes etc.


again it depends on your goals.

Make no mistake about it put what you have leaned here to practice and
you
will start to finally make those long awaited gains you have been after.
snip url


Use google to get advice from several different sources and go with
those who make the best case. But be conservative in what you do.
Lifting weights can be dangerous. Above all be careful and always
underestimate how much you can lift.

ps. Isolation exercises can be useful too. You should generally do
isolation exercises at the end after doing the compound exercises. But
you should have a good reason for doing isolation exercises. I
generally do a few isolation exercise to make a session up to an hour.

Ray







 




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