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Questions for a naturopath



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 18th, 2008, 01:59 AM posted to alt.support.diet
[email protected]
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Posts: 502
Default Questions for a naturopath

I fixed an appointment with a naturopath to help me with my diet. I
first want to meet with my family doctor to get all the test reports
off him (blood reports, radiographies, etc.) and bring them to the
naturopath in case there are things in those reports that he and I
should know.

I briefly talked with him over the phone today to set up an
appointment. I asked him if it is possible that my pot belly is made
more of water than fat. I know about "gut leak", but did not want to
mention the term yet. I just wanted to test his knowledge. He seemed
surprised with my questions and just said, "That's fat. That's fat".
Should I call another naturopath?

How should I prepare to face the naturopath? THanks.
  #2  
Old November 18th, 2008, 07:31 PM posted to alt.support.diet
Del Cecchi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 227
Default Questions for a naturopath


wrote in message
...
I fixed an appointment with a naturopath to help me with my diet. I
first want to meet with my family doctor to get all the test reports
off him (blood reports, radiographies, etc.) and bring them to the
naturopath in case there are things in those reports that he and I
should know.

I briefly talked with him over the phone today to set up an
appointment. I asked him if it is possible that my pot belly is made
more of water than fat. I know about "gut leak", but did not want to
mention the term yet. I just wanted to test his knowledge. He seemed
surprised with my questions and just said, "That's fat. That's fat".
Should I call another naturopath?

How should I prepare to face the naturopath? THanks.


So you think that you have a leak in your intestines that is causing
your abdomen to fill with fluid?

This "gut leak" stuff sounds like something made up by unscientific
people, sort of like the Chiropractors that claim all disease is due
to misalignments of spine.

Sorry, I am skeptical about the whole concept.

del


  #3  
Old November 18th, 2008, 07:41 PM posted to alt.support.diet
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 502
Default Questions for a naturopath

On Nov 18, 2:31*pm, "Del Cecchi"
wrote:
wrote in message

...

I fixed an appointment with a naturopath to help me with my diet. I
first want to meet with my family doctor to get all the test reports
off him (blood reports, radiographies, etc.) and bring them to the
naturopath in case there are things in those reports that he and I
should know.


I briefly talked with him over the phone today to set up an
appointment. I asked him if it is possible that my pot belly is made
more of water than fat. I know about "gut leak", but did not want to
mention the term yet. I just wanted to test his knowledge. He seemed
surprised with my questions and just said, "That's fat. That's fat".
Should I call another naturopath?


How should I prepare to face the naturopath? THanks.


So you think that you have a leak in your intestines that is causing
your abdomen to fill with fluid?

This "gut leak" stuff sounds like something made up by unscientific
people, sort of like the Chiropractors that claim all disease is due
to misalignments of spine.

Sorry, I am skeptical about the whole concept.

del


Del, you may be right. If you have a few minutes, it would be
appreciated if you could read this and let me know what you think.

http://www.treelight.com/health/nutrition/Wheat.html
  #4  
Old November 18th, 2008, 08:56 PM posted to alt.support.diet
Doug Freyburger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,866
Default Questions for a naturopath

" wrote:

Del, you may be right. If you have a few minutes, it would be
appreciated if you could read this and let me know what you think.

http://www.treelight.com/health/nutrition/Wheat.html


I'm specifically wheat intolerant rather than generally gluten
intolerant so I'll comment. First, if you suspect then stop
eating the stuff for two weeks and see if you feel better. Then
resume eating the stuff and see if you feel worse. It's not
obvious but it's a lot easier to tell getting worse than getting
better.

Being specifically wheat intolerant I don't need to avoid barley
(I like a beer or a shot most weeks) or rye (wheat free rye
bread is carried by some stores) or oats (I don't know why
the article does not list oats). But I do need to avoid wheat
varieties with fancy names that the article does not list as
wheat - triticale, spelt, kamut. I occasionally have pasta
from quinoa and various other non-what grains but it's easy
to just avoid anything that probably has wheat-poison in it.

The symptoms take so long to develop, in fact, that you get
used to them. "That's just the way things are", you think,
or: "That's just what happens when you get older."


Or "It runs in the family. We've always been like that."

But you can become so used to them that they feel "normal".


Exactly my situation before I went wheat free for two weeks.
Then boom a bunch of symptoms went away and my formal
normal is now my new misable. The change is amazing. When
I first added wheat back in the form of a floury gravy and boom
the symptoms came back in the long list, I wrote that nasty crap
off as poison and good riddence.

The largest amounts of glutens are found in wheat, rye, and
barley--a closely related trio of grains


The next in line for gluten content is oats. No idea why they
don't list it.

Then there are the "in between" grains: couscoous, amaranth,
quinoa, semolina, spelt, kamut, teff and triticale. Those grains
don't contain gluten per se, but research has shown they have
very similar effects. So until the research or personal testing
says otherwise, they're on the suspect list.


Couscoous is wheat chopped into coarse bits not fine flour
so I have no idea why they call it not wheat. Semolina is wheat
that is ground rather than chopped, but it's coarse ground so I
have no idea why it's not listed as wheat either. Triticale is one
of the standard breeds of wheat (as is the Star Trek quadro
triticale) so this is like says Macintosh isn't apple. Spelt and
kaumt are ancient stock of wheat that's seen less selective
breeding than modern wheat so I get that it the issue is amount
of gluten not presence of it they won't be as big a problem.

The only grains or flour from which gluten proteins are
completely absent are rice, corn, potato, buckwheat, and
coconut flour, as well as arrowroot, millet, and tapioca. Those
are the only realistic grains for anyone who is gluten sensitive.


Note that rice, corn and millet are grains. Millet is mostly used
as cattle feed but I've found millet bread in some health foods
stores. Potato, arrowroot and tapioca are roots and tubers not
grains. Buckwheat is neither a deer nor a grain the same way
pineapple is niether a connifer tree nor a red fruit. Buckwheat
looks like grain when it's seeds but not that much in the field.
Coconut flour? Really? Somebody send recipes!

Over time, a food-elimination diet will identify the culprits who
have been causing you trouble. (A trained nutritionist can guide
you through the process.)


If you read Doctor Atkins New Diet Revolution for what it actually
says to do rather than just glancing at it for target carb counts,
his plan includes a food elimination diet. It's the OWL sequence
and the carb ladder list.

Remember, gluten is addictive. So for a couple of weeks it will
feel like you're giving up the whole world. You may wonder,
"What on earth will I eat?"


Consider the reactions so many have against Atkins and think
about what that says about gluten addiction. Those who bash
Atkins are often showing symptoms of addiction without knowing
it. It helps me feel sympathy for folks I'd otherwise consider
hateful bashers.

But in a matter of weeks, the addiction will be gone. You'll be
less hungry, and you won't go hungry. You especially won't
be having those hunger attacks that make you feel like you're
starving.


This is the most amazing thing in the world - It becomes easy to
stay on. One bite of addictive poison and you're starting from
scratch again, though. It's unstable.

After a while, as Dr. Rick Peterson says, "It's just the way I
eat". It may not seem possible now, but you'll look at cookies
and cakes, bagels and donuts, pancakes and muffins, and find
yourself thinking: "Yuch. Who needs it?"


For me it's "Where's the food? Does anyone have food for
humans?" when I see baked goods. It hardly even occurs to me
that others can eat that poison without ill effect and when I look
for ill effects in the folks who do eat them, it's surprising how
often I see some of those ill effects.

Conditionally Avoid - Oats


Ah. Well past half way down they finally mention it.

But please note that you not have to live without baked
goods entirely. There are plenty of gluten-free breads and
even cookies these days, made from one or more of the
"good grains" listed below:


Thing is, once I figured out that wheat is a personal poison my
attitude changed and I don't miss toxic nasty poisonous
un-food baked goods. If I know for sure they are wheat-free I
may have them as a treat, but I don't miss them if I never have
them.

To determine which foods cause you problems, it's a good
idea to remove every possible suspect from the diet. Get
down to a minimal diet that you know is healthy, and then try
new things every three or four days. Give each one 3 days to
manifest systems before you decide that it is ok, then either
avoid it or add it back to your diet. (This "elimination diet" is
best done under the supervision of qualified nutritionist, so you
find out everything you should avoid.)


So there you have it - That may as well be a quote from the Atkins
plan. I guess the good doctor's ghost is my nutritionist.

As your intestinal wall regrows, foods that gave you problems
before become easily tolerated once again. So every three
months or so, you can re-test the foods that are on the not-OK
list.


That's a lot more aggressive than my experience. After 4 years of
constant and active wheat avoidance I found I could get an
accidental dose in cream-of-whatever-soup with only minimal ill
effects. Now 9 years into avoidance I can have a chicken fried
steak and eggs once per year, chew gum constantly for 4 hours
to help it through my digestion, and only snore badly for 2 nights
afterwards.

Because dairy is the last food that will come back to your diet,
and because healing takes 6 to 12 months, there's no point in
testing dairy products until 6 months after you start the healing
process. You might then test it once a month, until you find that
it no longer gives you problems. At that point, you'll know that
you have fully healed.


Dairy is the one large disagreement between Atkins and other
elinimation systems. Atkins allows it from the gate. It's a
loophole in Atkins.
  #5  
Old November 19th, 2008, 04:15 AM posted to alt.support.diet
Del Cecchi`
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Questions for a naturopath

wrote:
On Nov 18, 2:31 pm, "Del Cecchi"
wrote:

wrote in message

...


I fixed an appointment with a naturopath to help me with my diet. I
first want to meet with my family doctor to get all the test reports
off him (blood reports, radiographies, etc.) and bring them to the
naturopath in case there are things in those reports that he and I
should know.


I briefly talked with him over the phone today to set up an
appointment. I asked him if it is possible that my pot belly is made
more of water than fat. I know about "gut leak", but did not want to
mention the term yet. I just wanted to test his knowledge. He seemed
surprised with my questions and just said, "That's fat. That's fat".
Should I call another naturopath?


How should I prepare to face the naturopath? THanks.


So you think that you have a leak in your intestines that is causing
your abdomen to fill with fluid?

This "gut leak" stuff sounds like something made up by unscientific
people, sort of like the Chiropractors that claim all disease is due
to misalignments of spine.

Sorry, I am skeptical about the whole concept.

del



Del, you may be right. If you have a few minutes, it would be
appreciated if you could read this and let me know what you think.

http://www.treelight.com/health/nutrition/Wheat.html

Arrrgh. What a collection of misinformation mixed with a little fact.

"For many, gluten is an intestinal abrasive that effectively
"sandpapers" your insides"

There are folks that have an intolerance for gluten to a greater or
lesser degree. It is called Celiac, as is noted on the site. But it is
rare. I would like to see the study.... "In the latest study, one in
three people were found to be gluten sensitive, even though they were
showing no symptoms at all"


And then all the herbs and blather about "adrenal exhaustion"?

That page reminds me of the the person that used to post all over the
newsgroups about the evils of Nutrasweet.


Sounds like Bull**** to me. But if you want to test the hypothesis, you
don't need someone to tell you. Go on a gluten free diet for a couple
weeks and see if it makes a difference. Real Gluten Free foods are
available at grocery stores and specialty shops and some health food
stores. Rice is gluten free as I recall. Since Celiac disease is an
actual condition, you can read up on it. A sigmoid scope will diagnose
it easily.

I prefer to stick to actual medical doctors for my information.

del
  #6  
Old November 19th, 2008, 04:20 AM posted to alt.support.diet
Del Cecchi`
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Questions for a naturopath

Doug Freyburger wrote:
" wrote:

Del, you may be right. If you have a few minutes, it would be
appreciated if you could read this and let me know what you think.

http://www.treelight.com/health/nutrition/Wheat.html



I'm specifically wheat intolerant rather than generally gluten
intolerant so I'll comment. First, if you suspect then stop
eating the stuff for two weeks and see if you feel better. Then
resume eating the stuff and see if you feel worse. It's not
obvious but it's a lot easier to tell getting worse than getting
better.

Being specifically wheat intolerant I don't need to avoid barley
(I like a beer or a shot most weeks) or rye (wheat free rye
bread is carried by some stores) or oats (I don't know why
the article does not list oats). But I do need to avoid wheat
varieties with fancy names that the article does not list as
wheat - triticale, spelt, kamut. I occasionally have pasta
from quinoa and various other non-what grains but it's easy
to just avoid anything that probably has wheat-poison in it.


The symptoms take so long to develop, in fact, that you get
used to them. "That's just the way things are", you think,
or: "That's just what happens when you get older."



Or "It runs in the family. We've always been like that."


But you can become so used to them that they feel "normal".



Exactly my situation before I went wheat free for two weeks.
Then boom a bunch of symptoms went away and my formal
normal is now my new misable. The change is amazing. When
I first added wheat back in the form of a floury gravy and boom
the symptoms came back in the long list, I wrote that nasty crap
off as poison and good riddence.


The largest amounts of glutens are found in wheat, rye, and
barley--a closely related trio of grains



The next in line for gluten content is oats. No idea why they
don't list it.


Then there are the "in between" grains: couscoous, amaranth,
quinoa, semolina, spelt, kamut, teff and triticale. Those grains
don't contain gluten per se, but research has shown they have
very similar effects. So until the research or personal testing
says otherwise, they're on the suspect list.



Couscoous is wheat chopped into coarse bits not fine flour
so I have no idea why they call it not wheat. Semolina is wheat
that is ground rather than chopped, but it's coarse ground so I
have no idea why it's not listed as wheat either. Triticale is one
of the standard breeds of wheat (as is the Star Trek quadro
triticale) so this is like says Macintosh isn't apple. Spelt and
kaumt are ancient stock of wheat that's seen less selective
breeding than modern wheat so I get that it the issue is amount
of gluten not presence of it they won't be as big a problem.


The only grains or flour from which gluten proteins are
completely absent are rice, corn, potato, buckwheat, and
coconut flour, as well as arrowroot, millet, and tapioca. Those
are the only realistic grains for anyone who is gluten sensitive.



Note that rice, corn and millet are grains. Millet is mostly used
as cattle feed but I've found millet bread in some health foods
stores. Potato, arrowroot and tapioca are roots and tubers not
grains. Buckwheat is neither a deer nor a grain the same way
pineapple is niether a connifer tree nor a red fruit. Buckwheat
looks like grain when it's seeds but not that much in the field.
Coconut flour? Really? Somebody send recipes!


Over time, a food-elimination diet will identify the culprits who
have been causing you trouble. (A trained nutritionist can guide
you through the process.)



If you read Doctor Atkins New Diet Revolution for what it actually
says to do rather than just glancing at it for target carb counts,
his plan includes a food elimination diet. It's the OWL sequence
and the carb ladder list.


Remember, gluten is addictive. So for a couple of weeks it will
feel like you're giving up the whole world. You may wonder,
"What on earth will I eat?"



Consider the reactions so many have against Atkins and think
about what that says about gluten addiction. Those who bash
Atkins are often showing symptoms of addiction without knowing
it. It helps me feel sympathy for folks I'd otherwise consider
hateful bashers.


But in a matter of weeks, the addiction will be gone. You'll be
less hungry, and you won't go hungry. You especially won't
be having those hunger attacks that make you feel like you're
starving.



This is the most amazing thing in the world - It becomes easy to
stay on. One bite of addictive poison and you're starting from
scratch again, though. It's unstable.


After a while, as Dr. Rick Peterson says, "It's just the way I
eat". It may not seem possible now, but you'll look at cookies
and cakes, bagels and donuts, pancakes and muffins, and find
yourself thinking: "Yuch. Who needs it?"



For me it's "Where's the food? Does anyone have food for
humans?" when I see baked goods. It hardly even occurs to me
that others can eat that poison without ill effect and when I look
for ill effects in the folks who do eat them, it's surprising how
often I see some of those ill effects.


Conditionally Avoid - Oats



Ah. Well past half way down they finally mention it.


But please note that you not have to live without baked
goods entirely. There are plenty of gluten-free breads and
even cookies these days, made from one or more of the
"good grains" listed below:



Thing is, once I figured out that wheat is a personal poison my
attitude changed and I don't miss toxic nasty poisonous
un-food baked goods. If I know for sure they are wheat-free I
may have them as a treat, but I don't miss them if I never have
them.


To determine which foods cause you problems, it's a good
idea to remove every possible suspect from the diet. Get
down to a minimal diet that you know is healthy, and then try
new things every three or four days. Give each one 3 days to
manifest systems before you decide that it is ok, then either
avoid it or add it back to your diet. (This "elimination diet" is
best done under the supervision of qualified nutritionist, so you
find out everything you should avoid.)



So there you have it - That may as well be a quote from the Atkins
plan. I guess the good doctor's ghost is my nutritionist.


As your intestinal wall regrows, foods that gave you problems
before become easily tolerated once again. So every three
months or so, you can re-test the foods that are on the not-OK
list.



That's a lot more aggressive than my experience. After 4 years of
constant and active wheat avoidance I found I could get an
accidental dose in cream-of-whatever-soup with only minimal ill
effects. Now 9 years into avoidance I can have a chicken fried
steak and eggs once per year, chew gum constantly for 4 hours
to help it through my digestion, and only snore badly for 2 nights
afterwards.


Because dairy is the last food that will come back to your diet,
and because healing takes 6 to 12 months, there's no point in
testing dairy products until 6 months after you start the healing
process. You might then test it once a month, until you find that
it no longer gives you problems. At that point, you'll know that
you have fully healed.



Dairy is the one large disagreement between Atkins and other
elinimation systems. Atkins allows it from the gate. It's a
loophole in Atkins.


Atkins isn't an allergy reduction diet as I recall. And gluten is a
protein which I thought atkins allowed.

You really shouldn't paint things as "poison" or "addictive" just
because you personally are sensitive to them. And cous cous is pasta.
Bulgar is chopped up wheat.
  #7  
Old November 19th, 2008, 01:16 PM posted to alt.support.diet
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 502
Default Questions for a naturopath

On 18 nov, 14:31, "Del Cecchi" wrote:
wrote in message

...

I fixed an appointment with a naturopath to help me with my diet. I
first want to meet with my family doctor to get all the test reports
off him (blood reports, radiographies, etc.) and bring them to the
naturopath in case there are things in those reports that he and I
should know.


I briefly talked with him over the phone today to set up an
appointment. I asked him if it is possible that my pot belly is made
more of water than fat. I know about "gut leak", but did not want to
mention the term yet. I just wanted to test his knowledge. He seemed
surprised with my questions and just said, "That's fat. That's fat".
Should I call another naturopath?


How should I prepare to face the naturopath? THanks.


So you think that you have a leak in your intestines that is causing
your abdomen to fill with fluid?

This "gut leak" stuff sounds like something made up by unscientific
people, sort of like the Chiropractors that claim all disease is due
to misalignments of spine.

Sorry, I am skeptical about the whole concept.

del


I'm seeing my doctor next week. I read that an ultrasound should tell
me if it is water or fat in belly. As he already took one a few months
back, I will ask him to analyse the ultrasound report he has.
  #8  
Old November 19th, 2008, 04:32 PM posted to alt.support.diet
Doug Freyburger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,866
Default Questions for a naturopath

Del Cecchi` wrote:

Atkins isn't an allergy reduction diet as I recall.


Then you utterly ignored all of the discussion of food
intolerances and the cravings they trigger. Plenty of folks
ignore vast portions of the Atkins books and treat his
process like all there is to it is counting calories. And
then they draw conclusions about Atkins based on
ignoring vast portions of the directions. Shrug.

And gluten is a
protein which I thought atkins allowed.


Whole grains are at the last rung of the Atkins carb ladder and
thinking that Atkins allows *any* food for *everyone* utterly
ignores all of the discussion of food intolerances and the
cravings they trigger. Plenty of folks ignore vast portions of
the Atkins process and then make conclusions about what's
allowed. Doesn't make those conclusions correct.

You really shouldn't paint things as "poison" or "addictive" just
because you personally are sensitive to them.


This is why I call wheat a "personal poison". Sure enough
that follows the Atkins system of eliminate and challenge as
described in the discussions of food intolerances and the
cravings they trigger. Once a food is found to trigger cravings
and/or other symptoms it is to be written off and avoided from
then on per the directions.

As to calling the cravings that result from eating untolerated
foods addictive, I stand by the description. I also stand by
my statement that folks who haven't had a grain free week
in their lives asserting they aren't addicted to grain is naive
foolishness based on lack of experimental data. How many
are addicted I don't know but anyone who eats grain daily
for their entire life is totally unqualified to deny being
addicted.

And cous cous is pasta.


It's wheat pellets about the same size as bulgar.

Bulgar is chopped up wheat.


It's wheat pellets about the same size as cous cous.

Thanks for the distinction on how cous cous and bulgar are
manufactured. Both are nearly pure wheat so why the article
called them lower in gluten is a mystery. It's so easy to
check that it makes other errors that much more glaring.
  #9  
Old November 19th, 2008, 05:48 PM posted to alt.support.diet
Del Cecchi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 227
Default Questions for a naturopath


wrote in message
...
On 18 nov, 14:31, "Del Cecchi"
wrote:
wrote in message

...

I fixed an appointment with a naturopath to help me with my diet.
I
first want to meet with my family doctor to get all the test
reports
off him (blood reports, radiographies, etc.) and bring them to
the
naturopath in case there are things in those reports that he and
I
should know.


I briefly talked with him over the phone today to set up an
appointment. I asked him if it is possible that my pot belly is
made
more of water than fat. I know about "gut leak", but did not want
to
mention the term yet. I just wanted to test his knowledge. He
seemed
surprised with my questions and just said, "That's fat. That's
fat".
Should I call another naturopath?


How should I prepare to face the naturopath? THanks.


So you think that you have a leak in your intestines that is
causing
your abdomen to fill with fluid?

This "gut leak" stuff sounds like something made up by unscientific
people, sort of like the Chiropractors that claim all disease is
due
to misalignments of spine.

Sorry, I am skeptical about the whole concept.

del


I'm seeing my doctor next week. I read that an ultrasound should
tell
me if it is water or fat in belly. As he already took one a few
months
back, I will ask him to analyse the ultrasound report he has.


They claim that it is a literal leak so your abdominal cavity fills
with fluid? If so, I would think a trip to the ER was in order. I
interpreted it as allowing evil allergens to percolate into the blood
stream where they cause classic fluid retention.

I'm pretty sure having a bunch of fluid in your abdominal cavity would
lead to infection and severe illness in short order. See for example
peritonitis. "The more common type of peritonitis, called secondary
peritonitis, is caused by the entry of bacteria or enzymes into the
peritoneum from the gastrointestinal or biliary tract"

del


  #10  
Old November 19th, 2008, 05:50 PM posted to alt.support.diet
Del Cecchi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 227
Default Questions for a naturopath


wrote in message
...
On 18 nov, 14:31, "Del Cecchi"
wrote:
wrote in message

...

I fixed an appointment with a naturopath to help me with my diet.
I
first want to meet with my family doctor to get all the test
reports
off him (blood reports, radiographies, etc.) and bring them to
the
naturopath in case there are things in those reports that he and
I
should know.


I briefly talked with him over the phone today to set up an
appointment. I asked him if it is possible that my pot belly is
made
more of water than fat. I know about "gut leak", but did not want
to
mention the term yet. I just wanted to test his knowledge. He
seemed
surprised with my questions and just said, "That's fat. That's
fat".
Should I call another naturopath?


How should I prepare to face the naturopath? THanks.


So you think that you have a leak in your intestines that is
causing
your abdomen to fill with fluid?

This "gut leak" stuff sounds like something made up by unscientific
people, sort of like the Chiropractors that claim all disease is
due
to misalignments of spine.

Sorry, I am skeptical about the whole concept.

del


I'm seeing my doctor next week. I read that an ultrasound should
tell
me if it is water or fat in belly. As he already took one a few
months
back, I will ask him to analyse the ultrasound report he has.


The condition is called Ascites.
http://uimc.discoveryhospital.com/main.php?id=185


 




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New here, have a few questions Rechelle General Discussion 48 November 8th, 2003 02:34 AM
some questions [email protected] Low Carbohydrate Diets 3 September 28th, 2003 05:54 PM


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