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Study Links High-Carbs and Weight Loss



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 28th, 2004, 07:16 AM
zsklar
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Posts: n/a
Default Study Links High-Carbs and Weight Loss

By LINDSEY TANNER, AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO - In the midst of the low-carb craze, a new study suggests that by
eating lots of carbohydrates and little fat, it is possible to lose weight
without actually cutting calories - and without exercising, either.

Related Links
. Study Abstract (AIM)



In Yahoo! Health


The study was small, consisting of just 34 overweight adults who either ate
the recommended diet for three months; ate the recommended diet and
exercised regularly; or ate pretty much what they usually eat.


All meals were prepared for participants, who were instructed to eat as much
as they wanted. They also were told to return any uneaten food, which the
researchers said enabled them to calculate calorie intake.


Many doctors dispute whether people can lose weight without reducing their
food intake, and at least one questioned the study's accuracy.


But the diet is more compatible with conventional notions of healthful
eating than the fatty, low-carbohydrate Atkins and South Beach diets.


Participants on the recommended diet lost about 7 pounds without cutting
calories and without exercise, and almost 11 pounds with 45 minutes of
stationary bike-riding four times weekly. The control group lost no weight.


The findings appear in Monday's Archives of Internal Medicine (news - web
sites).


Gary Foster, clinical director of the University of Pennsylvania's Weight
and Eating Disorders Program, said he suspects participants who lost weight
ate less than what was reported. He said that while he recommends a low-fat,
high carb diet to patients, without calorie reduction it would be "a public
health disaster."


"The whole idea that you could lose weight without reducing energy intake
flies in the face of 100 years of data," Foster said.


Lead author William Evans of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
stood by his findings.


"Calories in minus calories out does not always determine the amount of
weight loss," Evans said. "This is because we metabolize fats and
carbohydrates very differently."


American Dietetic Association spokeswoman Cindy Moore agreed and said with
low-carb diets hogging the spotlight, "it may be a reminder that we can lose
weight in a variety of different ways."


Foods on the successful diets included high-fiber cereal, vegetarian chili,
whole-wheat spaghetti, many fruits and vegetables, and skim milk. Daily
calories totaled about 2,400, similar to participants' usual consumption.


The control group also received prepared meals with similar calories, but
the foods included sausage, scrambled eggs, macaroni and cheese, French
fries, whole milk and fewer fruits and vegetables.


The successful diet was not tested against Atkins and other low-carb
regimens, which contain more fat and fewer carbs than the control group
diet.


  #2  
Old January 28th, 2004, 03:47 PM
tcomeau
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Posts: n/a
Default Study Links High-Carbs and Weight Loss

"zsklar" wrote in message om...
By LINDSEY TANNER, AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO - In the midst of the low-carb craze, a new study suggests that by
eating lots of carbohydrates and little fat, it is possible to lose weight
without actually cutting calories - and without exercising, either.

Related Links
. Study Abstract (AIM)



In Yahoo! Health


The study was small, consisting of just 34 overweight adults who either ate
the recommended diet for three months; ate the recommended diet and
exercised regularly; or ate pretty much what they usually eat.


All meals were prepared for participants, who were instructed to eat as much
as they wanted. They also were told to return any uneaten food, which the
researchers said enabled them to calculate calorie intake.


Many doctors dispute whether people can lose weight without reducing their
food intake, and at least one questioned the study's accuracy.


But the diet is more compatible with conventional notions of healthful
eating than the fatty, low-carbohydrate Atkins and South Beach diets.


Participants on the recommended diet lost about 7 pounds without cutting
calories and without exercise, and almost 11 pounds with 45 minutes of
stationary bike-riding four times weekly. The control group lost no weight.


snip


The successful diet was not tested against Atkins and other low-carb
regimens, which contain more fat and fewer carbs than the control group
diet.



---------------------------------
Effects of an Ad Libitum Low-Fat, High-Carbohydrate Diet on Body
Weight, Body Composition, and Fat Distribution in Older Men and Women
A Randomized Controlled Trial

Nicholas P. Hays, PhD; Raymond D. Starling, PhD; Xiaolan Liu, MD;
Dennis H. Sullivan, MD; Todd A. Trappe, PhD; James D. Fluckey, PhD;
William J. Evans, PhD


Arch Intern Med. 2004;164:210-217.

Background The efficacy of ad libitum low-fat diets in reducing body
weight and fat in overweight and obese adults remains controversial.

Methods We examined the effect of a 12-week low-fat, high–complex
carbohydrate diet alone (HI-CHO) and in combination with aerobic
exercise training (HI-CHO + EX) on body weight and composition in 34
individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (20 women and 14 men; mean
± SEM age, 66 ± 1 years). Participants were randomly assigned to a
control diet (41% fat, 14% protein, 45% carbohydrates, and 7 g of
fiber per 1000 kcal), a HI-CHO diet (18% fat, 19% protein, 63%
carbohydrates, and 26 g of fiber per 1000 kcal), or a HI-CHO diet plus
endurance exercise 4 d/wk, 45 min/d, at 80% peak oxygen consumption
(HI-CHO + EX). Participants were provided 150% of estimated energy
needs and were instructed to consume food ad libitum. Total food
intake, body composition, resting metabolic rate, and substrate
oxidation were measured.

Results There was no significant difference in total food intake
among the 3 groups and no change in energy intake over time. The
HI-CHO + EX and HI-CHO groups lost more body weight (–4.8 ± 0.9 kg [P
= .003] and –3.2 ± 1.2 kg [P = .02]) and a higher percentage of body
fat (–3.5% ± 0.7% [P = .01] and –2.2% ± 1.2% [P = .049]) than controls
(–0.1 ± 0.6 kg and 0.2% ± 0.6%). In addition, thigh fat area decreased
in the HI-CHO (P = .003) and HI-CHO + EX (P.001) groups compared with
controls. High carbohydrate intake and weight loss did not result in a
decreased resting metabolic rate or reduced fat oxidation.

Conclusion A high-carbohydrate diet consumed ad libitum, with no
attempt at energy restriction or change in energy intake, results in
losses of body weight and body fat in older men and women.


From the Nutrition, Metabolism, and Exercise Laboratory, Donald W.
Reynolds Department of Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical
Sciences and Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock.
Dr Starling is now with Pfizer Global Research and Development,
Groton, Conn. The authors have no relevant financial interest in this
article.

-------------------------

About the authors:

Dennis H. Sullivan, M.D., Department of Geriatrics, University of
Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock. Research on feeding tubes
supported in part by Abbott Laboratories. (J. Amer. Coll. Nutr.
2000;19:446-50)


William J. Evans, PhD:

Oh lookee, the main author has written a book about.... dieting. And
it isn't a low-carb diet, big surprise. Published last May.

AstroFit: The Astronaut Program for Anti-Aging
by William J. Evans (Author), Gerald Secor Couzens (Author)
Paperback: 320 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.81 x 8.42 x 5.53
Publisher: Free Press; (May 13, 2003)
ISBN: 0743216822

William J. Evans, Ph.D., a pioneer in the field of age reversal for
more than twenty years, has worked as an expert adviser to NASA on
nutrition and exercise since 1988, and is the former head of the
Nutrition, Physical Fitness, and Rapid Rehabilitation Team of the
National Space Biomedical Institution. He lives in Little Rock,
Arkansas, with his wife and three children. --This text refers to the
Hardcover edition.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...glance&s=books

Gee I hope his study that found how good his diet is helps him make
the top ten bestsellers list.

At least Dr. Atkins had the ethics to let others do the studies on his
diet.

TC
  #3  
Old January 28th, 2004, 05:21 PM
PJx
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Study Links High-Carbs and Weight Loss


Thanks for the post.

As one who knows that the mantra, "Calories in equal calories out" is
pure fiction, I love it!

PJ




On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 07:16:06 GMT, "zsklar"
wrote:

By LINDSEY TANNER, AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO - In the midst of the low-carb craze, a new study suggests that by
eating lots of carbohydrates and little fat, it is possible to lose weight
without actually cutting calories - and without exercising, either.

Related Links
. Study Abstract (AIM)



In Yahoo! Health


The study was small, consisting of just 34 overweight adults who either ate
the recommended diet for three months; ate the recommended diet and
exercised regularly; or ate pretty much what they usually eat.


All meals were prepared for participants, who were instructed to eat as much
as they wanted. They also were told to return any uneaten food, which the
researchers said enabled them to calculate calorie intake.


Many doctors dispute whether people can lose weight without reducing their
food intake, and at least one questioned the study's accuracy.


But the diet is more compatible with conventional notions of healthful
eating than the fatty, low-carbohydrate Atkins and South Beach diets.


Participants on the recommended diet lost about 7 pounds without cutting
calories and without exercise, and almost 11 pounds with 45 minutes of
stationary bike-riding four times weekly. The control group lost no weight.


The findings appear in Monday's Archives of Internal Medicine (news - web
sites).


Gary Foster, clinical director of the University of Pennsylvania's Weight
and Eating Disorders Program, said he suspects participants who lost weight
ate less than what was reported. He said that while he recommends a low-fat,
high carb diet to patients, without calorie reduction it would be "a public
health disaster."


"The whole idea that you could lose weight without reducing energy intake
flies in the face of 100 years of data," Foster said.


Lead author William Evans of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
stood by his findings.


"Calories in minus calories out does not always determine the amount of
weight loss," Evans said. "This is because we metabolize fats and
carbohydrates very differently."


American Dietetic Association spokeswoman Cindy Moore agreed and said with
low-carb diets hogging the spotlight, "it may be a reminder that we can lose
weight in a variety of different ways."


Foods on the successful diets included high-fiber cereal, vegetarian chili,
whole-wheat spaghetti, many fruits and vegetables, and skim milk. Daily
calories totaled about 2,400, similar to participants' usual consumption.


The control group also received prepared meals with similar calories, but
the foods included sausage, scrambled eggs, macaroni and cheese, French
fries, whole milk and fewer fruits and vegetables.


The successful diet was not tested against Atkins and other low-carb
regimens, which contain more fat and fewer carbs than the control group
diet.


  #4  
Old January 28th, 2004, 07:40 PM
Cubit
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Study Links High-Carbs and Weight Loss -BS

I notice OP has no link to a reputable source, and creative stories have
been posted on USENET before.

Tcoeau has posted an alledged study, but also with no link to a reputable
source, like CNN.

In Tcoeau's post it says the participants did Aerobic Exercise. Excercise
can produce weight loss.

This study may not exist. If it does, there are unaccounted for factors.


  #5  
Old January 28th, 2004, 08:29 PM
Doug Freyburger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Study Links High-Carbs and Weight Loss

zsklar quoted:

By LINDSEY TANNER, AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO - In the midst of the low-carb craze, a new study suggests that by
eating lots of carbohydrates and little fat, it is possible to lose weight
without actually cutting calories - and without exercising, either.


Sure whatever. Who *hasn't* been on a low fat diet? Low fat works for
very many people. Even discounting the real people it doesn't work for
because there's a similar number low carbing doesn't work for, the *big*
reason folks quit low fat plans is they feel constant hunger. If you're
one of the few who doesn't experience cravings on a low fat plan, stick
ith it.

All meals were prepared for participants, who were instructed to eat as much
as they wanted. They also were told to return any uneaten food, which the
researchers said enabled them to calculate calorie intake.


Prepared food to avoid cheating. Right. Do that with any plan and
it will work.

But the diet is more compatible with conventional notions of healthful
eating than the fatty, low-carbohydrate Atkins and South Beach diets.


So what? Who's to say that convential wisdom is correct? Like bleeding
George Washington to help him die more quickly. Conventional wisdom
gets stuff wrong, and eventually changes.

"The whole idea that you could lose weight without reducing energy intake
flies in the face of 100 years of data," Foster said.


As long as you carefully ignore the data from low carb studies that is.
The data from those studies doesn't make sense if you assume caloric
restriction is the be-all and end-all of weight loss, so the data gets
ignored.

American Dietetic Association spokeswoman Cindy Moore agreed and said with
low-carb diets hogging the spotlight, "it may be a reminder that we can lose
weight in a variety of different ways."


Everyone is different. No plan works for everyone. When you can
control all of the food someone eats the chances they'll lose is
higher on any plan. All truths.

The successful diet was not tested against Atkins and other low-carb
regimens, which contain more fat and fewer carbs than the control group
diet.


Very convenient that.
  #6  
Old January 28th, 2004, 08:37 PM
Pat Paris
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Study Links High-Carbs and Weight Loss -BS

On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 19:40:08 GMT, "Cubit" wrote:

I notice OP has no link to a reputable source, and creative stories have
been posted on USENET before.

Tcoeau has posted an alledged study, but also with no link to a reputable
source, like CNN.

Did I miss something? When did CNN become a reputable source for
anything?

This study may not exist. If it does, there are unaccounted for factors.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/467707

Jan. 26, 2004 — An ad libitum high-complex carbohydrate (HI-CHO) diet
is effective for weight loss, according to the results of a 12-week,
randomized controlled diet study published in the Jan. 26 issue of the
Archives of Internal Medicine.

"The efficacy of ad libitum low-fat diets in reducing body weight and
fat in overweight and obese adults remains controversial," write
Nicholas P. Hays, PhD, from the University of Arkansas for Medical
Sciences in Little Rock, and colleagues. "[HI-CHO] diets have been
extensively recommended to prevent obesity and promote weight loss in
overweight individuals, based on evidence suggesting that these diets
reduce total energy intake, increase satiation, and are metabolized
with less energetic efficiency compared with high-fat diets."

Twenty women and 14 men with impaired glucose tolerance were
randomized to a control diet consisting of 41% fat, 14% protein, 45%
carbohydrates, and 7 g of fiber per 1,000 kcal; a HI-CHO diet
consisting of 18% fat, 19% protein, 63% carbohydrates, and 26 g of
fiber per 1,000 kcal; or a HI-CHO diet plus endurance exercise four
days per week, 45 minutes per day at 80% peak oxygen consumption. Mean
age was 66 ± 1 years. Subjects were provided with 150% of estimated
energy needs and permitted to consume food ad libitum.

The three groups were similar in total food intake, and energy intake
remained stable during the 12-week study in all groups. Weight loss
was -0.1 ± 0.6 kg in controls, -4.8 ± 0.9 kg (P = .003) in the HI-CHO
diet plus exercise group, and -3.2 ± 1.2 kg (P = .02) in the HI-CHO
diet without exercise group. Reduction in percentage of body fat was
-0.2% ± 0.6%, -3.5% ± 0.7% (P = .01) and -2.2% ± 1.2% (P = .049),
respectively.

Compared with controls, thigh fat area decreased in the HI-CHO diet (P
= .003) and HI-CHO diet plus exercise (P .001) groups. Resting
metabolic rate and fat oxidation did not decrease as a result of high
carbohydrate intake and weight loss. Because the weight loss in the
HI-CHO diet group cannot be explained by any differential in reported
energy intake between this group and the control group, the authors
suggest that there may be either bias in this method of food intake
assessment or the existence of metabolic differences attributable to
dietary macronutrient composition differences among groups.

"A high-carbohydrate diet consumed ad libitum, with no attempt at
energy restriction or change in energy intake, results in losses of
body weight and body fat in older men and women," the authors write.
"Participants never complained of feeling hungry, an important
consideration in the formulation of dietary strategies to promote
weight loss and long-term maintenance of a healthy body weight."

The National Institutes of Health helped support this study. One of
the authors is now with Pfizer Global Research and Development. The
authors report no relevant financial interest in this article.

Arch Intern Med. 2004;164:210-217


  #7  
Old January 28th, 2004, 08:38 PM
jmk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Study Links High-Carbs and Weight Loss



On 1/28/2004 3:29 PM, Doug Freyburger wrote:
zsklar quoted:


All meals were prepared for participants, who were instructed to eat as much
as they wanted. They also were told to return any uneaten food, which the
researchers said enabled them to calculate calorie intake.



Prepared food to avoid cheating. Right. Do that with any plan and
it will work.


On one hand, I agree with you but on the other hand, isn't this how the
Harvard study that was so touted on this ng conducted? (no, I don't
mean by you specifically, but by the ng in general)

"The study was carefully controlled for what participants ate over the
12 weeks. Rather than giving participants a list of approved foods and
quantities and setting them free, Greene had the food prepared fresh
daily according to special recipes at a Cambridge restaurant, Ristorante
Marino." -- http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/...3-lowcarb.html

"The whole idea that you could lose weight without reducing energy intake
flies in the face of 100 years of data," Foster said.



As long as you carefully ignore the data from low carb studies that is.
The data from those studies doesn't make sense if you assume caloric
restriction is the be-all and end-all of weight loss, so the data gets
ignored.


Well, there is also a quote in there saying that the researches think
that the subjects didn't report things 100% properly (don't know how
since they measured the food).

Everyone is different. No plan works for everyone. When you can
control all of the food someone eats the chances they'll lose is
higher on any plan. All truths.


Yup, this is definitely true. YMMV with any WOE.
--
jmk in NC

  #8  
Old January 28th, 2004, 09:43 PM
LCer09
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Study Links High-Carbs and Weight Loss -BS


I notice OP has no link to a reputable source, and creative stories have
been posted on USENET before.


They ran that story on my local news the other night. Since it was on TV, it
must be true. (haha)

LCing since 12/01/03-
Me- 265/234/140
& hubby- 310/261/180
  #9  
Old January 28th, 2004, 10:28 PM
Harold Groot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Study Links High-Carbs and Weight Loss

On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 07:16:06 GMT, "zsklar"
wrote:

Daily calories totaled about 2400, similar to participants' usual consumption.


That last bit =might= be a weak point on this study. Just HOW did
they determine that the participants had been consuming 2400 calories
prior to the study? =If= they used a questionaire, we should keep in
mind that people are notorious for under-reporting food consumption,
typically in the region of 400-800 calories/day. So it seems quite
=possible= that the people had actually been eating 3000 calories a
day (and holding their weight steady) prior to the study, told the
researchers they were eating 2400, and when actually eating a MEASURED
2400 calories they started to lose weight.

If they actually MEASURED the pre-diet consumption at 2400 calories,
that's something else entirely. So it would be quite helpful if they
included something about HOW that data point was established.


  #10  
Old January 29th, 2004, 01:34 AM
tcomeau
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Study Links High-Carbs and Weight Loss -BS

"Cubit" wrote in message om...
I notice OP has no link to a reputable source, and creative stories have
been posted on USENET before.

Tcoeau has posted an alledged study, but also with no link to a reputable
source, like CNN.

In Tcoeau's post it says the participants did Aerobic Exercise. Excercise
can produce weight loss.

This study may not exist. If it does, there are unaccounted for factors.


It exists. It is just one of the most disgusting pieces of what passes
for todays science that I've seen in a long time. Absolute crap.

Generally, when I respond to a study that's in the news or is posted
to these ngs, it is with some interesting and usually damning
additional information about he "scientists" that put this BS
together. Read the following, especially the last part. The main
"researcher" has written a diet book, a high-carb diet book. He's
thrown whatever credibilty he had out the window when he decided to
create a study to support his diet book.

And get this, they had the un-mitigated gall to add this line to it:

"The authors have no relevant financial interest in this article."

Can you believe this nonsense. And the journals keep publishing this
crap as bonafide science.


quote ******************
Effects of an Ad Libitum Low-Fat, High-Carbohydrate Diet on Body
Weight, Body Composition, and Fat Distribution in Older Men and Women
A Randomized Controlled Trial

Nicholas P. Hays, PhD; Raymond D. Starling, PhD; Xiaolan Liu, MD;
Dennis H. Sullivan, MD; Todd A. Trappe, PhD; James D. Fluckey, PhD;
William J. Evans, PhD


Arch Intern Med. 2004;164:210-217.

Background The efficacy of ad libitum low-fat diets in reducing body
weight and fat in overweight and obese adults remains controversial.

Methods We examined the effect of a 12-week low-fat,
high–complex
carbohydrate diet alone (HI-CHO) and in combination with aerobic
exercise training (HI-CHO + EX) on body weight and composition in 34
individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (20 women and 14 men; mean
± SEM age, 66 ± 1 years). Participants were randomly assigned to a
control diet (41% fat, 14% protein, 45% carbohydrates, and 7 g of
fiber per 1000 kcal), a HI-CHO diet (18% fat, 19% protein, 63%
carbohydrates, and 26 g of fiber per 1000 kcal), or a HI-CHO diet plus
endurance exercise 4 d/wk, 45 min/d, at 80% peak oxygen consumption
(HI-CHO + EX). Participants were provided 150% of estimated energy
needs and were instructed to consume food ad libitum. Total food
intake, body composition, resting metabolic rate, and substrate
oxidation were measured.

Results There was no significant difference in total food intake
among the 3 groups and no change in energy intake over time. The
HI-CHO + EX and HI-CHO groups lost more body weight (–4.8 ± 0.9
kg [P
= .003] and –3.2 ± 1.2 kg [P = .02]) and a higher percentage of
body
fat (–3.5% ± 0.7% [P = .01] and –2.2% ± 1.2% [P = .049])
than controls
(–0.1 ± 0.6 kg and 0.2% ± 0.6%). In addition, thigh fat area
decreased
in the HI-CHO (P = .003) and HI-CHO + EX (P.001) groups compared with
controls. High carbohydrate intake and weight loss did not result in a
decreased resting metabolic rate or reduced fat oxidation.

Conclusion A high-carbohydrate diet consumed ad libitum, with no
attempt at energy restriction or change in energy intake, results in
losses of body weight and body fat in older men and women.


From the Nutrition, Metabolism, and Exercise Laboratory, Donald W.
Reynolds Department of Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical
Sciences and Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock.
Dr Starling is now with Pfizer Global Research and Development,
Groton, Conn. The authors have no relevant financial interest in this
article.
********************* end quote

About the authors:

Dennis H. Sullivan, M.D., Department of Geriatrics, University of
Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock. Research on feeding tubes
supported in part by Abbott Laboratories. (J. Amer. Coll. Nutr.
2000;19:446-50)


William J. Evans, PhD:

Oh lookee, the main author has written a book about.... dieting. And
it isn't a low-carb diet, big surprise. Published last May.

AstroFit: The Astronaut Program for Anti-Aging
by William J. Evans (Author), Gerald Secor Couzens (Author)
Paperback: 320 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.81 x 8.42 x 5.53
Publisher: Free Press; (May 13, 2003)
ISBN: 0743216822

William J. Evans, Ph.D., a pioneer in the field of age reversal for
more than twenty years, has worked as an expert adviser to NASA on
nutrition and exercise since 1988, and is the former head of the
Nutrition, Physical Fitness, and Rapid Rehabilitation Team of the
National Space Biomedical Institution. He lives in Little Rock,
Arkansas, with his wife and three children. --This text refers to the
Hardcover edition.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...glance&s=books

Gee I hope his study that found how good his diet is helps him make
the top ten bestsellers list.

At least Dr. Atkins had the ethics to let others do the studies on his
diet.

TC
 




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