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Reading two books



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 13th, 2004, 02:45 PM
Mary M - Ohio
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Default Reading two books

Hi all --

My two books from Amazon came -- Richard Fairburn's "Overcoming Binge Eating" and
Laurel Mellin's "The Solution" -- both intended to help me understand reasons behind
overeating, not only because it has been a lifelong problem, but especially since I
have been having such trouble with overeating over the past few months.

I have finished the Fairburn book and was not overly moved by it ... in fact I found
that most of it didn't seem to apply to me, but to those afflicted with bulimia. The
time he spent discussing binge eating disorder was marked by admissions that almost
nothing is known about it. I guess I concluded that I don't have binge eating
disorder, because I couldn't relate to much that was said about it, though I was
expecting the opposite. The book was too "scientific" for my liking -- I need
something more emotionally appealing -- but perhaps this impression is just from the
fact that I couldn't recognize myself in the first part of the book which explains
binge behavior -- again, I hadn't expected that at all.

I've just started "The Solution" which is way more suited to my own feelings,
experience, and immediate needs. Already I've had the "that's me" feeling numerous
times, even though I've only read about 25 pages -- and I never got that feeling from
the Fairburn book, perhaps because it was written from such a clinical standpoint --
the "program" part of his book seemed to focus on keeping a food journal and not a
whole lot beyond that -- and keeping a food journal was very good for my weight loss
but it hasn't had any lasting effects on stopping the underlying reasons and urges to
overeat.

I know others have been helped by the Fairburn book and it's certainly worth
reading -- it did give me some insights at the time I read it, which I've already
forgotten -- hence my feeling that the book wasn't really for me, because usually
impressions and insights I get from a book last with me a long time. So I'm going to
continue reading "The Solution" with great interest -- I wonder if anyone else has
read it.

Mary M
325-153-145 (that's what I weighed at my last checkup - 153- , but this morning I
was 164 -- eeek)



  #2  
Old October 14th, 2004, 09:01 AM
janice
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Mary, I have a copy of the Christopher Fairburn book, which I've read
more than once. I haven't heard of "The Solution" so can't comment.

I found the first part of the Fairburn book really did speak to me. I
don't remember seeing a description of binge eating behaviour which
matched so well with my own experience. Like you, I recognise that
bulimia is a completely different problem (and one which I've never
experienced or even considered).

I was particularly interested in the strong link he makes between
dieting and bingeing, which I've known for years applied to me but
which I've seen denied elsewhere. Also he mentions the "all or
nothing" approach, which is certainly me, as typical of the type of
personality for a binger. He strongly recommends no total avoidance
of certain foods, and links the "all or nothing" approach to people
with binge behaviour. Presumably, with your views on sugar you don't
identify with this, but for me it ties in strongly with my own
feelings and experience.

The second half of the book I found much more difficult. I'm a very
long way off from being able to give up dieting or even from being
able to cope with a very slow rate of weight loss. That's too big a
subject in its own right to start in this thread.

I'm currently reading "Thin for Life" in preparation for the asd book
club discussion. Have you read this? If not, I would thoroughly
recommend it. I've found it has presented some new ideas and concepts
to me and has caused me to think quite a bit.

janice
  #3  
Old October 15th, 2004, 02:54 PM
Mary M - Ohio
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"Ignoramus19594" wrote in message
...
Mary, to be honest, I read both books and found them to be less based
on evidence than I regularly like. It is hard to make decisions based
on book suggestions when the book is lacking in evidence. I liked
Fairburn's honesty in admitting lack of general knowledge of the
subject. If a book includes references to just how much is known about
various issues being discussed, that, to me, is a sign of honesty. I
liked the same about Roy Walford's 120 Year Diet book. Roy went to
great lengths to explain what is known and what is not known.


Yes, I didn't mind that they didn't know a lot about it and freely admitted that, but
I was hoping for more information that I could use.

The Solution book sells for next to nothing on Amazon, but Overcoming
Binge Eating can fetch a few bucks. Selling used books on amazon is
very easy and I personally sell books that I do not want to keep.


Hmmm, that's a good thought -- I usually donate my books to Goodwill.

You are right in digging deeply to identify what exactly is "your
problem with eating". Trying to know just what happens and why, is the
foundation of successfully solving problems.


Yes, I don't want to be forever sitting on figurative "beach ball in the water" which
I can hold down OK, but once I'm distracted, comes right back up with a vengeance. I
am finding The Solution to be very helpful in that regard -- and of course having a
place here to talk about these things.

Mary


  #4  
Old October 15th, 2004, 03:08 PM
Mary M - Ohio
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"janice" wrote in message
...
Mary, I have a copy of the Christopher Fairburn book, which I've read
more than once. I haven't heard of "The Solution" so can't comment.

I found the first part of the Fairburn book really did speak to me. I
don't remember seeing a description of binge eating behaviour which
matched so well with my own experience. Like you, I recognise that
bulimia is a completely different problem (and one which I've never
experienced or even considered).


I'm not sure why I wasn't particularly struck by the book, because I was sure that I
would see myself in the binge eating descriptions -- and of course, there were
similarities -- but I didn't get the "that's me" feeling that I've gotten from OA
literature, "Fit from Within" and other books.

I was particularly interested in the strong link he makes between
dieting and bingeing, which I've known for years applied to me but
which I've seen denied elsewhere. Also he mentions the "all or
nothing" approach, which is certainly me, as typical of the type of
personality for a binger. He strongly recommends no total avoidance
of certain foods, and links the "all or nothing" approach to people
with binge behaviour. Presumably, with your views on sugar you don't
identify with this, but for me it ties in strongly with my own
feelings and experience.


And I thought of you while I was reading it! I do tend toward "all or nothing" too in
many ways, and there were personality similarities, but I know for myself that it's
the food itself that causes me to start the spiral downwards -- i.e. I was able to
break that weeks-long sugarfree food problem and haven't had any sugarfree junk since
9/24 (since I talked about it here), and my thoughts are so much clearer and my
behavior is so much more normal. My family has a strong propensity toward diabetes
and as I look through the family tree and see so many problems with overweight on one
side of the family, I truly feel that there's a genetic inability to handle
sugar/white flour and the resulting insulin spiral. The ones in my immediate family
who take more after the "other side" have never had weight problems, though we were
all brought up eating the same way.

The second half of the book I found much more difficult. I'm a very
long way off from being able to give up dieting or even from being
able to cope with a very slow rate of weight loss. That's too big a
subject in its own right to start in this thread.


I understand how you feel, (((((((Janice)))))))).

I'm currently reading "Thin for Life" in preparation for the asd book
club discussion. Have you read this? If not, I would thoroughly
recommend it. I've found it has presented some new ideas and concepts
to me and has caused me to think quite a bit.

That's the other one I wanted to try and couldn't remember it! Yes, I will get that
one too and read it -- thanks, Janice -- I always appreciate your thoughtful replies.

Mary


  #5  
Old October 16th, 2004, 02:00 AM
JMA
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Default


"Mary M - Ohio" wrote in message
...
Hi all --

My two books from Amazon came -- Richard Fairburn's "Overcoming Binge
Eating" and
Laurel Mellin's "The Solution" -- both intended to help me understand
reasons behind
overeating, not only because it has been a lifelong problem, but
especially since I
have been having such trouble with overeating over the past few months.

I have finished the Fairburn book and was not overly moved by it ... in
fact I found
that most of it didn't seem to apply to me, but to those afflicted with
bulimia. The
time he spent discussing binge eating disorder was marked by admissions
that almost
nothing is known about it. I guess I concluded that I don't have binge
eating
disorder, because I couldn't relate to much that was said about it, though
I was
expecting the opposite. The book was too "scientific" for my liking -- I
need
something more emotionally appealing -- but perhaps this impression is
just from the
fact that I couldn't recognize myself in the first part of the book which
explains
binge behavior -- again, I hadn't expected that at all.


Hey, sorry for the late reply - I wanted to put some thought into it.

Sorry you found the book disappointing. OTOH, it's probably not a bad thing
that you didn't identify with it. I liked the scientific aspect of it
because for some reason I felt like it validated what I was going through
when others were telling me to just snap out of it or worse making me feel
like my situation was the result of a personal failure or character defect.

I do like the books that are emotionally appealing which is why I continued
to read other books this summer.

I've just started "The Solution" which is way more suited to my own
feelings,
experience, and immediate needs. Already I've had the "that's me" feeling
numerous
times, even though I've only read about 25 pages -- and I never got that
feeling from
the Fairburn book, perhaps because it was written from such a clinical
standpoint --
the "program" part of his book seemed to focus on keeping a food journal
and not a
whole lot beyond that -- and keeping a food journal was very good for my
weight loss
but it hasn't had any lasting effects on stopping the underlying reasons
and urges to
overeat.


For whatever reason, the type of journal he recommended worked for me when
nothing else has. I always kept a food log, but not always recording the
"situation" or my perceptions of how in control I was. It was good for me
to see where my perceptions were skewed at times. It's a basic tenet of
cognitive therapy which I underwent for a different situation many moons
ago. It really helped me change my way of thinking which helped me change
my behavior. I also use it on some of my ED (emotionally disturbed)
students.

I'll also look at "The Solution" because I'm always looking for good books
to address my issues. I'm glad you found something to help!

Jenn



  #6  
Old October 16th, 2004, 02:00 AM
JMA
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Mary M - Ohio" wrote in message
...
Hi all --

My two books from Amazon came -- Richard Fairburn's "Overcoming Binge
Eating" and
Laurel Mellin's "The Solution" -- both intended to help me understand
reasons behind
overeating, not only because it has been a lifelong problem, but
especially since I
have been having such trouble with overeating over the past few months.

I have finished the Fairburn book and was not overly moved by it ... in
fact I found
that most of it didn't seem to apply to me, but to those afflicted with
bulimia. The
time he spent discussing binge eating disorder was marked by admissions
that almost
nothing is known about it. I guess I concluded that I don't have binge
eating
disorder, because I couldn't relate to much that was said about it, though
I was
expecting the opposite. The book was too "scientific" for my liking -- I
need
something more emotionally appealing -- but perhaps this impression is
just from the
fact that I couldn't recognize myself in the first part of the book which
explains
binge behavior -- again, I hadn't expected that at all.


Hey, sorry for the late reply - I wanted to put some thought into it.

Sorry you found the book disappointing. OTOH, it's probably not a bad thing
that you didn't identify with it. I liked the scientific aspect of it
because for some reason I felt like it validated what I was going through
when others were telling me to just snap out of it or worse making me feel
like my situation was the result of a personal failure or character defect.

I do like the books that are emotionally appealing which is why I continued
to read other books this summer.

I've just started "The Solution" which is way more suited to my own
feelings,
experience, and immediate needs. Already I've had the "that's me" feeling
numerous
times, even though I've only read about 25 pages -- and I never got that
feeling from
the Fairburn book, perhaps because it was written from such a clinical
standpoint --
the "program" part of his book seemed to focus on keeping a food journal
and not a
whole lot beyond that -- and keeping a food journal was very good for my
weight loss
but it hasn't had any lasting effects on stopping the underlying reasons
and urges to
overeat.


For whatever reason, the type of journal he recommended worked for me when
nothing else has. I always kept a food log, but not always recording the
"situation" or my perceptions of how in control I was. It was good for me
to see where my perceptions were skewed at times. It's a basic tenet of
cognitive therapy which I underwent for a different situation many moons
ago. It really helped me change my way of thinking which helped me change
my behavior. I also use it on some of my ED (emotionally disturbed)
students.

I'll also look at "The Solution" because I'm always looking for good books
to address my issues. I'm glad you found something to help!

Jenn



  #7  
Old October 17th, 2004, 02:27 PM
Gloria
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Default

Mary , I really am the ALL OR NOTHING person too. I find that this is
really how WE binge eaters are, the ALL OR NOTHING kind. I think that
this is a GOOD description of me in MANY things in life but the WORST is
in my eating.

glo




  #8  
Old October 17th, 2004, 02:27 PM
Gloria
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Default

Mary , I really am the ALL OR NOTHING person too. I find that this is
really how WE binge eaters are, the ALL OR NOTHING kind. I think that
this is a GOOD description of me in MANY things in life but the WORST is
in my eating.

glo




  #9  
Old October 18th, 2004, 08:59 PM
Doug Freyburger
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Default

Gloria wrote:

Mary , I really am the ALL OR NOTHING person too.


ALL or NOTHING leads to NOTHING. EVERY time.

Okay, only 99.99% of the time, but that's not poetically
correct for the context ...
  #10  
Old October 18th, 2004, 10:08 PM
Gloria
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Doug wrote: All or nothing LEADS TO NOTHING!!!!!

I AGREE but .................OKAY ,Doug ,
YOU are correct AGAIN! PLUS you made me THINK!! I'm really better at 60
than I was at the ripe ole age of maybe 38 or so. I've been through a
bunch of crap in my life to get to 'here' and I'm beyond a whole bunch
of stuff BUT ya know , I"M NEVER beyond learning about life

Thanks for your words although these were a bit harsh G
BTW I have a sign in my kitchen now that reads ALL OR NOTHING LEADS TO
NOTHING !

GOOD SIGN !

glo




 




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