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Verbal attack on Low Carb'ng



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 4th, 2004, 01:12 PM
Papa Joe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Verbal attack on Low Carb'ng

Hi
I read an
article(http://www.xposed.com/health/nutriti...arb_trend.aspx)
that spoke about pasta and how it(companies) is fighting back against
low carbing..which is OK.

But, I find one quote to be disturbing and probably incorrect--I know
it is for me anyway--it goes:

"How is it that it can be called a low-carb diet when in fact it is a
dangerous high-fat diet? How can that happen in our culture?" railed
K. Dun Gifford, president of the Oldways Preservation Trust, the
Boston-based food issues think tank that organized the event."

I don't know about others, but I do not find that the foods I eat are
any more high fat than those who are not low carbing.It's not like we
go out of the way to eat fat, but, I would rather think we have a
handle on what we eat and we can choose to eat foods that are not fat
free. Heck, we can also choose to eat fat free foods if we want to. I
do and it is fine with me. For example, I drink the low carb milk and
the variety I like best is the low fat version....not a bad thing
because it is low fat, I just happen to like it best.

I think that some people are really stretching this food thing and the
right of someone to choose to know what they are eating a bit out of
control....and to be part of a "Boston-based food issues think tank"
no less.

Well, I just wanted to share the idea and article. (here is the
website of the organization http://www.oldwayspt.org/ ).

Sure, I don't eat ketchup, drink cranberry juice, both of which need
so much sugar to be palatable, but does that make me part of a fad
diet? So what if I eat bread that is classified low carb--maybe the
slices are 50% thinner than 'regular' bread--does that make it 'bad'?

Having been on low/almost no-fat for an extended period of time during
which I lost quite a bit of arm and leg muscle, I find the extremes to
be problems. However, blending what I consider to be the best of foods
out there, which may include low carb components, not to be bad
thing. I have been doing low carb since July 22nd and find it not to
be a challenge to stay on induction at all. In fact, it is hard to
move from it as I do not have really good self control! Five carbs a a
week increase is not easy to pull off.

Probably should not be as touchy.

FWIW.
Joe

ps, I know about the cranberry and ketchup as I made a batch of
each--once--and was so amazed at how much sugar it took to make them
both...I told .my dad, who was into maturity onset diabetes and into
cranberry juice, because it was 'good for the kidneys' that it was
not so good for the diabetes....He also liked ketchup on his
hamburgers and french fries(couldn't blame him there)....he passed
away at 80 with his first and only heart attack. He enjoyed food and I
am glad he did.



----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
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  #2  
Old November 4th, 2004, 01:51 PM
Bev-Ann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

My daily nutrient intake hasn't really changed regarding fat or protein.
It's only that I've replaced all the high-carb foods with LC choices. But
I've only been an a "diet" once before in my life and it was so low-calorie
(500/day) that I ended up looking like a concentration camp survivor due to
muscle loss. I'm actually at a lower body weight right now than I was
after that diet but I certainly look and feel a lot healthier.

on Thu, 04 Nov 2004 07:12:35 -0500, Papa Joe wrote:

I don't know about others, but I do not find that the foods I eat are
any more high fat than those who are not low carbing.It's not like we
go out of the way to eat fat, but, I would rather think we have a
handle on what we eat and we can choose to eat foods that are not fat
free. Heck, we can also choose to eat fat free foods if we want to. I
do and it is fine with me. For example, I drink the low carb milk and
the variety I like best is the low fat version....not a bad thing
because it is low fat, I just happen to like it best.


-----
Bev
  #3  
Old November 4th, 2004, 02:12 PM
Roger Zoul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Papa Joe wrote:
:: Hi
:: I read an
::
article(http://www.xposed.com/health/nutriti...ck_amid_low-ca
rb_trend.aspx)
:: that spoke about pasta and how it(companies) is fighting back against
:: low carbing..which is OK.
::
:: But, I find one quote to be disturbing and probably incorrect--I know
:: it is for me anyway--it goes:
::
:: "How is it that it can be called a low-carb diet when in fact it is a
:: dangerous high-fat diet? How can that happen in our culture?" railed
:: K. Dun Gifford, president of the Oldways Preservation Trust, the
:: Boston-based food issues think tank that organized the event."


The statement is incorrect, obviously. LC typically is a high-fat diet.
That part is true. It is also a low-carb diet, so that is true. However,
for most, it is not a dangerous diet at all. It is the so-called standard
American diet that is dangerous, because it comes lots of carbs and lots of
fat, along with an excess of calories. That combination is a killer. Also,
for those who do well on a low-carb diet (diabetics and people with insulin
resistance issues), a low-fat diet can be dangerous too.


::
:: I don't know about others, but I do not find that the foods I eat are
:: any more high fat than those who are not low carbing.

That can be very true. Those who are not low carbing and not eating low fat
are probably getting plenty of fat and plenty of carbs. You've removed the
carbs, which result in normalization of BG levels, resulting in reduced
appetite. As are, you're not hungry on fewer calories than previously and
you can lose weight.

Of course, some find that they can still increase fat intake while keeping
calories below that required to maintain their weight. They may be eating a
greater amount of fat than before (especially if they were trained to be
fat-aware like many in this country were). Yet they can still improve
health and lose weight.

In the absence of excessive carbs and excessive calories, a high-fat diet is
very likely to not be dangerous.

It's not like we
:: go out of the way to eat fat,

Some do....because they like fat and because they fill it provides satiety.

but, I would rather think we have a
:: handle on what we eat and we can choose to eat foods that are not fat
:: free.

That works....

:: Heck, we can also choose to eat fat free foods if we want to.

That would be straight protein or high-fiber veggies on a LC diet.

I
:: do and it is fine with me. For example, I drink the low carb milk and
:: the variety I like best is the low fat version....not a bad thing
:: because it is low fat, I just happen to like it best.
::
:: I think that some people are really stretching this food thing and
:: the
:: right of someone to choose to know what they are eating a bit out of
:: control....and to be part of a "Boston-based food issues think tank"
:: no less.
::

I don't know what you're saying there.

:: Well, I just wanted to share the idea and article. (here is the
:: website of the organization http://www.oldwayspt.org/ ).
::
:: Sure, I don't eat ketchup, drink cranberry juice, both of which need
:: so much sugar to be palatable, but does that make me part of a fad
:: diet? So what if I eat bread that is classified low carb--maybe the
:: slices are 50% thinner than 'regular' bread--does that make it 'bad'?
::
:: Having been on low/almost no-fat for an extended period of time
:: during
:: which I lost quite a bit of arm and leg muscle, I find the extremes
:: to
:: be problems. However, blending what I consider to be the best of
:: foods
:: out there, which may include low carb components, not to be bad
:: thing. I have been doing low carb since July 22nd and find it not to
:: be a challenge to stay on induction at all. In fact, it is hard to
:: move from it as I do not have really good self control! Five carbs a
:: a
:: week increase is not easy to pull off.
::
:: Probably should not be as touchy.
::
:: FWIW.
:: Joe
::
:: ps, I know about the cranberry and ketchup as I made a batch of
:: each--once--and was so amazed at how much sugar it took to make them
:: both...I told .my dad, who was into maturity onset diabetes and into
:: cranberry juice, because it was 'good for the kidneys' that it was
:: not so good for the diabetes....He also liked ketchup on his
:: hamburgers and french fries(couldn't blame him there)....he passed
:: away at 80 with his first and only heart attack. He enjoyed food and
:: I
:: am glad he did.
::
::
::
:: ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet
:: News==---- http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the
:: World! 100,000 Newsgroups ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total
:: Privacy via Encryption =---


  #4  
Old November 4th, 2004, 02:21 PM
MaryL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Papa Joe" wrote in message
...
Hi
I read an
article(http://www.xposed.com/health/nutriti...arb_trend.aspx)
that spoke about pasta and how it(companies) is fighting back against
low carbing..which is OK.

But, I find one quote to be disturbing and probably incorrect--I know
it is for me anyway--it goes:

"How is it that it can be called a low-carb diet when in fact it is a
dangerous high-fat diet? How can that happen in our culture?" railed
K. Dun Gifford, president of the Oldways Preservation Trust, the
Boston-based food issues think tank that organized the event."

I don't know about others, but I do not find that the foods I eat are
any more high fat than those who are not low carbing.It's not like we
go out of the way to eat fat, ....





I am following South Beach, which emphasizes low-fat (not a true low-carb
diet, of course, because they stress "good carbs not bad carbs"). I also
have eliminated all bread, potatoes, rice, and pasta. In my case, that is
*much* lower-carb than in my pre-diabetic/pre-diet days. A couple of weeks
ago, I began using FitDay to evaluate my nutritional intake. I'm not sure
how accurate some of their values are, but I was truly startled to find that
my carbs and fat are now basically equal but I have low protein intake! I
have been eating lots and lots of veggies, quite a few fresh fruit, and some
lean meat -- but I obviously haven't been getting as much meat as I thought.
This leads me to think that "high fat" can be misleading. For example, I
see from looking at FitDay that much of my fat comes from eating nuts and
cheese (low-fat when possible, but I also get some "regular" cheese).
That's very different from saturated fats (which I try to limit) or
trans-fats (which I try to avoid completely). I know that many low-carbers
are not concerned about the amount of fat, but I am still skeptical about
that.

MaryL


  #5  
Old November 4th, 2004, 02:21 PM
MaryL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Papa Joe" wrote in message
...
Hi
I read an
article(http://www.xposed.com/health/nutriti...arb_trend.aspx)
that spoke about pasta and how it(companies) is fighting back against
low carbing..which is OK.

But, I find one quote to be disturbing and probably incorrect--I know
it is for me anyway--it goes:

"How is it that it can be called a low-carb diet when in fact it is a
dangerous high-fat diet? How can that happen in our culture?" railed
K. Dun Gifford, president of the Oldways Preservation Trust, the
Boston-based food issues think tank that organized the event."

I don't know about others, but I do not find that the foods I eat are
any more high fat than those who are not low carbing.It's not like we
go out of the way to eat fat, ....





I am following South Beach, which emphasizes low-fat (not a true low-carb
diet, of course, because they stress "good carbs not bad carbs"). I also
have eliminated all bread, potatoes, rice, and pasta. In my case, that is
*much* lower-carb than in my pre-diabetic/pre-diet days. A couple of weeks
ago, I began using FitDay to evaluate my nutritional intake. I'm not sure
how accurate some of their values are, but I was truly startled to find that
my carbs and fat are now basically equal but I have low protein intake! I
have been eating lots and lots of veggies, quite a few fresh fruit, and some
lean meat -- but I obviously haven't been getting as much meat as I thought.
This leads me to think that "high fat" can be misleading. For example, I
see from looking at FitDay that much of my fat comes from eating nuts and
cheese (low-fat when possible, but I also get some "regular" cheese).
That's very different from saturated fats (which I try to limit) or
trans-fats (which I try to avoid completely). I know that many low-carbers
are not concerned about the amount of fat, but I am still skeptical about
that.

MaryL


  #6  
Old November 4th, 2004, 04:19 PM
Cubit
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I find that I agree with Roger Zoul on much of this. He makes a very good
rebuttal.

I would add that in addition to liking fat and seeking the satiety that fat
can produce, one (like myself) may believe that high fat leads to good
health in addition to loss of excess weight. If one cuts carbs sharply, and
then researches and chooses a prudent protein level, fat is the only way to
get the additional calories needed. [-unless you count alcohol as a calorie
choice LOL]

Cubit

"Roger Zoul" wrote in message
...
Papa Joe wrote:
:: Hi
:: I read an
::

article(http://www.xposed.com/health/nutriti...ck_amid_low-ca
rb_trend.aspx)
:: that spoke about pasta and how it(companies) is fighting back against
:: low carbing..which is OK.
::
:: But, I find one quote to be disturbing and probably incorrect--I know
:: it is for me anyway--it goes:
::
:: "How is it that it can be called a low-carb diet when in fact it is a
:: dangerous high-fat diet? How can that happen in our culture?" railed
:: K. Dun Gifford, president of the Oldways Preservation Trust, the
:: Boston-based food issues think tank that organized the event."


The statement is incorrect, obviously. LC typically is a high-fat diet.
That part is true. It is also a low-carb diet, so that is true. However,
for most, it is not a dangerous diet at all. It is the so-called standard
American diet that is dangerous, because it comes lots of carbs and lots

of
fat, along with an excess of calories. That combination is a killer.

Also,
for those who do well on a low-carb diet (diabetics and people with

insulin
resistance issues), a low-fat diet can be dangerous too.


::
:: I don't know about others, but I do not find that the foods I eat are
:: any more high fat than those who are not low carbing.

That can be very true. Those who are not low carbing and not eating low

fat
are probably getting plenty of fat and plenty of carbs. You've removed

the
carbs, which result in normalization of BG levels, resulting in reduced
appetite. As are, you're not hungry on fewer calories than previously and
you can lose weight.

Of course, some find that they can still increase fat intake while keeping
calories below that required to maintain their weight. They may be eating

a
greater amount of fat than before (especially if they were trained to be
fat-aware like many in this country were). Yet they can still improve
health and lose weight.

In the absence of excessive carbs and excessive calories, a high-fat diet

is
very likely to not be dangerous.

It's not like we
:: go out of the way to eat fat,

Some do....because they like fat and because they fill it provides

satiety.

but, I would rather think we have a
:: handle on what we eat and we can choose to eat foods that are not fat
:: free.

That works....

:: Heck, we can also choose to eat fat free foods if we want to.

That would be straight protein or high-fiber veggies on a LC diet.

I
:: do and it is fine with me. For example, I drink the low carb milk and
:: the variety I like best is the low fat version....not a bad thing
:: because it is low fat, I just happen to like it best.
::
:: I think that some people are really stretching this food thing and
:: the
:: right of someone to choose to know what they are eating a bit out of
:: control....and to be part of a "Boston-based food issues think tank"
:: no less.
::

I don't know what you're saying there.

:: Well, I just wanted to share the idea and article. (here is the
:: website of the organization http://www.oldwayspt.org/ ).
::
:: Sure, I don't eat ketchup, drink cranberry juice, both of which need
:: so much sugar to be palatable, but does that make me part of a fad
:: diet? So what if I eat bread that is classified low carb--maybe the
:: slices are 50% thinner than 'regular' bread--does that make it 'bad'?
::
:: Having been on low/almost no-fat for an extended period of time
:: during
:: which I lost quite a bit of arm and leg muscle, I find the extremes
:: to
:: be problems. However, blending what I consider to be the best of
:: foods
:: out there, which may include low carb components, not to be bad
:: thing. I have been doing low carb since July 22nd and find it not to
:: be a challenge to stay on induction at all. In fact, it is hard to
:: move from it as I do not have really good self control! Five carbs a
:: a
:: week increase is not easy to pull off.
::
:: Probably should not be as touchy.
::
:: FWIW.
:: Joe
::
:: ps, I know about the cranberry and ketchup as I made a batch of
:: each--once--and was so amazed at how much sugar it took to make them
:: both...I told .my dad, who was into maturity onset diabetes and into
:: cranberry juice, because it was 'good for the kidneys' that it was
:: not so good for the diabetes....He also liked ketchup on his
:: hamburgers and french fries(couldn't blame him there)....he passed
:: away at 80 with his first and only heart attack. He enjoyed food and
:: I
:: am glad he did.
::
::
::
:: ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet
:: News==---- http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the
:: World! 100,000 Newsgroups ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total
:: Privacy via Encryption =---




  #7  
Old November 5th, 2004, 01:53 AM
Papa Joe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi
I am not sure if I agree that low carb means high fat. While it, in
reality could be, it is not necessarily so.

Probably one who is not in continuous ketosis would either need fat or
more carbs to satisfy the energy requirements, one who is in ketosis
gets the fat elsewhere.

However, one could eat low carb foods and lay off the fat and still
exist......at least I think so!

I don't eat a high fat diet and I am a low carb individual...granted
for only 4 months or so, but, still, it is a low carb diet for me.
I do not shun fat but do not look for it either.

FWIW.
Joe



On Thu, 4 Nov 2004 08:12:17 -0500, "Roger Zoul"
wrote:

Papa Joe wrote:
:: Hi
:: I read an
::
article(http://www.xposed.com/health/nutriti...ck_amid_low-ca
rb_trend.aspx)
:: that spoke about pasta and how it(companies) is fighting back against
:: low carbing..which is OK.
::
:: But, I find one quote to be disturbing and probably incorrect--I know
:: it is for me anyway--it goes:
::
:: "How is it that it can be called a low-carb diet when in fact it is a
:: dangerous high-fat diet? How can that happen in our culture?" railed
:: K. Dun Gifford, president of the Oldways Preservation Trust, the
:: Boston-based food issues think tank that organized the event."


The statement is incorrect, obviously. LC typically is a high-fat diet.
That part is true. It is also a low-carb diet, so that is true. However,
for most, it is not a dangerous diet at all. It is the so-called standard
American diet that is dangerous, because it comes lots of carbs and lots of
fat, along with an excess of calories. That combination is a killer. Also,
for those who do well on a low-carb diet (diabetics and people with insulin
resistance issues), a low-fat diet can be dangerous too.


::
:: I don't know about others, but I do not find that the foods I eat are
:: any more high fat than those who are not low carbing.

That can be very true. Those who are not low carbing and not eating low fat
are probably getting plenty of fat and plenty of carbs. You've removed the
carbs, which result in normalization of BG levels, resulting in reduced
appetite. As are, you're not hungry on fewer calories than previously and
you can lose weight.

Of course, some find that they can still increase fat intake while keeping
calories below that required to maintain their weight. They may be eating a
greater amount of fat than before (especially if they were trained to be
fat-aware like many in this country were). Yet they can still improve
health and lose weight.

In the absence of excessive carbs and excessive calories, a high-fat diet is
very likely to not be dangerous.

It's not like we
:: go out of the way to eat fat,

Some do....because they like fat and because they fill it provides satiety.

but, I would rather think we have a
:: handle on what we eat and we can choose to eat foods that are not fat
:: free.

That works....

:: Heck, we can also choose to eat fat free foods if we want to.

That would be straight protein or high-fiber veggies on a LC diet.

I
:: do and it is fine with me. For example, I drink the low carb milk and
:: the variety I like best is the low fat version....not a bad thing
:: because it is low fat, I just happen to like it best.
::
:: I think that some people are really stretching this food thing and
:: the
:: right of someone to choose to know what they are eating a bit out of
:: control....and to be part of a "Boston-based food issues think tank"
:: no less.
::

I don't know what you're saying there.

:: Well, I just wanted to share the idea and article. (here is the
:: website of the organization http://www.oldwayspt.org/ ).
::
:: Sure, I don't eat ketchup, drink cranberry juice, both of which need
:: so much sugar to be palatable, but does that make me part of a fad
:: diet? So what if I eat bread that is classified low carb--maybe the
:: slices are 50% thinner than 'regular' bread--does that make it 'bad'?
::
:: Having been on low/almost no-fat for an extended period of time
:: during
:: which I lost quite a bit of arm and leg muscle, I find the extremes
:: to
:: be problems. However, blending what I consider to be the best of
:: foods
:: out there, which may include low carb components, not to be bad
:: thing. I have been doing low carb since July 22nd and find it not to
:: be a challenge to stay on induction at all. In fact, it is hard to
:: move from it as I do not have really good self control! Five carbs a
:: a
:: week increase is not easy to pull off.
::
:: Probably should not be as touchy.
::
:: FWIW.
:: Joe
::
:: ps, I know about the cranberry and ketchup as I made a batch of
:: each--once--and was so amazed at how much sugar it took to make them
:: both...I told .my dad, who was into maturity onset diabetes and into
:: cranberry juice, because it was 'good for the kidneys' that it was
:: not so good for the diabetes....He also liked ketchup on his
:: hamburgers and french fries(couldn't blame him there)....he passed
:: away at 80 with his first and only heart attack. He enjoyed food and
:: I
:: am glad he did.
::
::
::
:: ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet
:: News==---- http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the
:: World! 100,000 Newsgroups ---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total
:: Privacy via Encryption =---




----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 100,000 Newsgroups
---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
  #8  
Old November 5th, 2004, 02:01 AM
Dusty
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

What data says that a "balanced" high fat diet is bad for our health. Did
some miss the recent info that said that olive oil IMPROVES our heart
health. From what I have read over the past few years the emphasis should be
on balanced fat intake, not low fat. Some saturated fat is required, the
rest should be mono and poly unsaturated fats, including the omega oils. But
as all the diabetic or prediabetic people can tell you, you can eat too much
carbohydrates.

"Papa Joe" wrote in message
...
Hi
I read an
article(http://www.xposed.com/health/nutriti...arb_trend.aspx)
that spoke about pasta and how it(companies) is fighting back against
low carbing..which is OK.

But, I find one quote to be disturbing and probably incorrect--I know
it is for me anyway--it goes:

"How is it that it can be called a low-carb diet when in fact it is a
dangerous high-fat diet? How can that happen in our culture?" railed
K. Dun Gifford, president of the Oldways Preservation Trust, the
Boston-based food issues think tank that organized the event."

I don't know about others, but I do not find that the foods I eat are
any more high fat than those who are not low carbing.It's not like we
go out of the way to eat fat, but, I would rather think we have a
handle on what we eat and we can choose to eat foods that are not fat
free. Heck, we can also choose to eat fat free foods if we want to. I
do and it is fine with me. For example, I drink the low carb milk and
the variety I like best is the low fat version....not a bad thing
because it is low fat, I just happen to like it best.

I think that some people are really stretching this food thing and the
right of someone to choose to know what they are eating a bit out of
control....and to be part of a "Boston-based food issues think tank"
no less.

Well, I just wanted to share the idea and article. (here is the
website of the organization http://www.oldwayspt.org/ ).

Sure, I don't eat ketchup, drink cranberry juice, both of which need
so much sugar to be palatable, but does that make me part of a fad
diet? So what if I eat bread that is classified low carb--maybe the
slices are 50% thinner than 'regular' bread--does that make it 'bad'?

Having been on low/almost no-fat for an extended period of time during
which I lost quite a bit of arm and leg muscle, I find the extremes to
be problems. However, blending what I consider to be the best of foods
out there, which may include low carb components, not to be bad
thing. I have been doing low carb since July 22nd and find it not to
be a challenge to stay on induction at all. In fact, it is hard to
move from it as I do not have really good self control! Five carbs a a
week increase is not easy to pull off.

Probably should not be as touchy.

FWIW.
Joe

ps, I know about the cranberry and ketchup as I made a batch of
each--once--and was so amazed at how much sugar it took to make them
both...I told .my dad, who was into maturity onset diabetes and into
cranberry juice, because it was 'good for the kidneys' that it was
not so good for the diabetes....He also liked ketchup on his
hamburgers and french fries(couldn't blame him there)....he passed
away at 80 with his first and only heart attack. He enjoyed food and I
am glad he did.



----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet
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  #9  
Old November 5th, 2004, 02:01 AM
Dusty
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What data says that a "balanced" high fat diet is bad for our health. Did
some miss the recent info that said that olive oil IMPROVES our heart
health. From what I have read over the past few years the emphasis should be
on balanced fat intake, not low fat. Some saturated fat is required, the
rest should be mono and poly unsaturated fats, including the omega oils. But
as all the diabetic or prediabetic people can tell you, you can eat too much
carbohydrates.

"Papa Joe" wrote in message
...
Hi
I read an
article(http://www.xposed.com/health/nutriti...arb_trend.aspx)
that spoke about pasta and how it(companies) is fighting back against
low carbing..which is OK.

But, I find one quote to be disturbing and probably incorrect--I know
it is for me anyway--it goes:

"How is it that it can be called a low-carb diet when in fact it is a
dangerous high-fat diet? How can that happen in our culture?" railed
K. Dun Gifford, president of the Oldways Preservation Trust, the
Boston-based food issues think tank that organized the event."

I don't know about others, but I do not find that the foods I eat are
any more high fat than those who are not low carbing.It's not like we
go out of the way to eat fat, but, I would rather think we have a
handle on what we eat and we can choose to eat foods that are not fat
free. Heck, we can also choose to eat fat free foods if we want to. I
do and it is fine with me. For example, I drink the low carb milk and
the variety I like best is the low fat version....not a bad thing
because it is low fat, I just happen to like it best.

I think that some people are really stretching this food thing and the
right of someone to choose to know what they are eating a bit out of
control....and to be part of a "Boston-based food issues think tank"
no less.

Well, I just wanted to share the idea and article. (here is the
website of the organization http://www.oldwayspt.org/ ).

Sure, I don't eat ketchup, drink cranberry juice, both of which need
so much sugar to be palatable, but does that make me part of a fad
diet? So what if I eat bread that is classified low carb--maybe the
slices are 50% thinner than 'regular' bread--does that make it 'bad'?

Having been on low/almost no-fat for an extended period of time during
which I lost quite a bit of arm and leg muscle, I find the extremes to
be problems. However, blending what I consider to be the best of foods
out there, which may include low carb components, not to be bad
thing. I have been doing low carb since July 22nd and find it not to
be a challenge to stay on induction at all. In fact, it is hard to
move from it as I do not have really good self control! Five carbs a a
week increase is not easy to pull off.

Probably should not be as touchy.

FWIW.
Joe

ps, I know about the cranberry and ketchup as I made a batch of
each--once--and was so amazed at how much sugar it took to make them
both...I told .my dad, who was into maturity onset diabetes and into
cranberry juice, because it was 'good for the kidneys' that it was
not so good for the diabetes....He also liked ketchup on his
hamburgers and french fries(couldn't blame him there)....he passed
away at 80 with his first and only heart attack. He enjoyed food and I
am glad he did.



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  #10  
Old November 5th, 2004, 02:37 PM
Chet Hayes
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"Sure, I don't eat ketchup, drink cranberry juice, both of which need
so much sugar to be palatable, but does that make me part of a fad
diet? "

Heh Papa, have you tried the Heinz LC ketchup? Tastes just like the regular to me.
 




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