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Atkins Diet



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 7th, 2004, 01:18 AM
cc0104007
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Default Atkins Diet

It seems that other diets are implementing the low carb life also yet many
critisize dr atkins. Do others notice this?

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  #2  
Old April 7th, 2004, 01:15 PM
Crafting Mom
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cc0104007 wrote:
It seems that other diets are implementing the low carb life also yet many
critisize dr atkins. Do others notice this?


It's because it's trendy. A lot of people like to say they are
low-carbing, but only really taking off the bread and pasta. It's kind
of like vegetarians who still eat chicken and fish. They like the way
the term sounds rolling off their tongues, but ask them to stop eating
fish and chicken and they'll freak ;-)

http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0405CARBS05.html

is an article which discusses this very topic. Many people who claim to
be low-carbing or "On Atkins" haven't really read the book and don't
really have an educated understanding of what it's all about or *why* it
works.

Low-carbing has it's place. I am on a low-carb diet myself. It attacks
a *specific* problem (insulin problems or carbohydrate addiction) and is
not necessarily for "everyone".

CM


  #3  
Old April 7th, 2004, 09:37 PM
Doug Freyburger
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Default Atkins Diet

cc0104007 wrote:

It seems that other diets are implementing the low carb life also yet many
critisize dr atkins. Do others notice this?


Notice carefully the change of topic in the middle:

"It seems that other diets are implementing the low carb life style also"

Right. Because it works for a *lot* of people. Not everyone, nothing
works for everyone. But a large percentage of the population.

"yet many critisize dr atkins"

Right. Notice that your statement isn't other plans criticizing Dr A,
it's random people doing that. Folks who've actually read the book and
know the contents have troubles finding stuff to complain about. Not
much to fault about being pressured to eat lots of veggies and finding
exactly what works for your own body after all. Are there other low
carb plans that criticize Atkins? I've only skimmed SBD so far so I
could easily have missed it, but I didn't notice any mention at all.
PP is careful to ignore Atkins. CAD has a brief mention that Dr Rachel
Heller failed to follow the directions when she tried Atkins but that's
hardly a complaint about Atkins itself.

But folks on the street who haven't even read the book, they love to
rag on Atkins. Such is life. Actually reading those nasty book things
is just so much hard work for some people. Think of it as a way to
filter on some combination of intelligence and motivation levels.
  #5  
Old April 8th, 2004, 01:49 PM
Patricia Heil
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Default Atkins Diet

Over against the fact that the ONLY clinical
studies done about Atkins were short term only,
and were funded by the Atkins foundation, and
no independent studies find that it is anything
other than another way of reducing calories.
Also, typical of most program diets, people regain
the weight when they switch back off it.

Start a healthy lifestyle of exercise and eating right.
You could avoid $6,000 or more a year in the cost of
drugs and medical procedures this way.


"Stan" wrote in message
...
On 7 Apr 2004 13:37:54 -0700, (Doug Freyburger)
wrote:

Are there other low
carb plans that criticize Atkins? I've only skimmed SBD so far so I
could easily have missed it, but I didn't notice any mention at all.



Agatston is very respectful of Atkins' work. I don't remember exactly
what he said, but his only mention of Atkins was favorable.

Stan



  #6  
Old April 8th, 2004, 03:44 PM
Crafting Mom
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Patricia Heil wrote:
no independent studies find that it is anything
other than another way of reducing calories.


You say that like it's a bad thing Yep, the calories are reduced,
greatly. No, I don't FEEL like I am on a calorie-reduced diet. This
goes against the religion of "you must suffer in order to lose weight".
I feel so good! I am never famished and watching the clock waiting for
my next meal! My diet is largely leafy greens, some proteins (mostly
fish/eggs/poultry), good oils like olive oil, and a bit of fruit and
dairy. ("Yes, Virginia, there is such a thing as fruit on a low carb
diet"). Any of the fluff and frills of standard diets don't suit me
very much.

I don't need the confirmation of any "studies" to know that for ME, I am
no longer walking around feeling "foggy", I no longer need to go near
the antacid aisle, and I feel energetic. The fact that the calories are
reduced is a GOOD thing. It's nice to be able to have a plate of fish
and salad and be able to stop there in mixed company without even
TRYING. I remember eating things like spaghetti in the past and wonder
how on EARTH the person sitting beside me felt "full" after half a
plate!

Low-carb dieting has re-introduced the whole POINT of food, that is to
*satisfy* hunger (as opposed to make me even hungrier), and nourish (as
opposed to consuming a bunch of junky empty calorie food).

Food has to be filling and actually COUNT, for me to consider it at all.
Low carb way of life (which I stumbled upon completely by ACCIDENT) has
changed my whole mindset about food.

Cheers
CM

  #7  
Old April 8th, 2004, 04:11 PM
Lictor
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Default Atkins Diet

"Crafting Mom" wrote in message
news
Patricia Heil wrote:

You say that like it's a bad thing Yep, the calories are reduced,
greatly. No, I don't FEEL like I am on a calorie-reduced diet.

This is because some people still claim that low carb is working some kind
of magic that allows to you to lose weight without any kind of restriction.
So, yes, saying that low carb works by reducing the total amount of calories
is meaningfull.
Most of the people around here seems to at least understand that, but in the
big outside world, many people (and ads) still believe in that kind of magic
thinking : eat as much as you want, as long as you eat no carb.

This goes against the religion of "you must suffer in order to lose

weight".

I don't believe in this religion. I don't "believe" in Aktins either. You
might say I'm a diet atheist.

I feel so good! I am never famished and watching the clock waiting for
my next meal! My diet is largely leafy greens, some proteins (mostly
fish/eggs/poultry), good oils like olive oil, and a bit of fruit and
dairy. ("Yes, Virginia, there is such a thing as fruit on a low carb
diet"). Any of the fluff and frills of standard diets don't suit me
very much.


I eat about the same things as you do, except I also eat red meat and carbs
(rice, pasta...). The idea of cutting one part of the nutriment from my food
not only seems unhealthy to me, but it would also mean never eating again
most of the cultural food that is available to me in my area. So, I was able
to eat paella at dinner yesterday, something that would be possible neither
under low carb (the rice - unless you're a glycemic low carb and consider
that paella has a reasonnable glycemic index) or low fat (paella without
olive oil and chorizo is just not paella). I guess weight-watcher, the Zone
or whatever is trendy right now wouldn't allow that kind of meal. And that's
my main problem with most diets. If I'm going to do something for the rest
of my life, I don't want it to go in the way of my enjoyment or social life.
And I don't find farmished either. I don't spend my time watching for the
next meal - unless I intend to cook something trully delicious. If I feel
hungry, I just eat. And if I don't feel hungry at the next meal, I just pass
it. And I still lose weight at a decent rate (actually, a little on the too
fast side according to my nutritionist) and my blood values have all
improved a lot during the last two months.

I don't need the confirmation of any "studies" to know that for ME, I am
no longer walking around feeling "foggy", I no longer need to go near
the antacid aisle, and I feel energetic. The fact that the calories are
reduced is a GOOD thing.


Since there is no over real way to lose weight, yes, it's a good thing. It's
also nice that you are feeling good on your diet, that's still an
improvement compared to other diets. But you're still on a diet, there is
some food you're not allowed to eat (and thus risk bingeing on, or
re-carbing as some call it), food that you might have liked.

It's nice to be able to have a plate of fish
and salad and be able to stop there in mixed company without even
TRYING.


Yes, it's very nice for you. Actually, that's one of the benefit I will give
to low carb : it cancelled some of the anti-fat mania that is still the
norm. The problem is that it did that with starting another mania.
So, you can eat your fish, and you are able to stop, and this is a nice
thing when you're having dinner with your friends. But what if your friends
have prepared a paella? Or couscous? How do you handle that? Do you ask your
friend to prepare special food for you? Do you bring you own?
You can't imagine the freedom there is when you are going to have dinner
with your friend, and the only reason you are worried about what they have
cooked is when it comes to pick the proper wine to go with it...

I remember eating things like spaghetti in the past and wonder
how on EARTH the person sitting beside me felt "full" after half a
plate!


Yes, I remember that too. Actually, I was thinking exactly the same about my
paella yesterday. Three months ago, the whole 1kg (2.2lbs) package would be
shared between my girlfriend and myself - and once I had finished my half, I
would finish the leftovers from my girlfriend. Yesterday, we just cooked
half the package, and my own portion was plenty enough. Before, I still had
room for some cheese, and then a dessert. Yesterday, I just felt full.
Actually, I now have troubles understanding how the hell I did manage to eat
that much.
Depending on what's on your spaghetti, I would probably feel full after half
the plate. Or maybe, if I had had no starter, I would actually eat the full
plate and then have no room next for neither cheese nor dessert. It's
perfectly possible to feel full on spaghettis, especially if it's not plain
no-butter spaghetti. I do agree that no fat spaghettis are neither fun nor
satisfying.

Low-carb dieting has re-introduced the whole POINT of food, that is to
*satisfy* hunger (as opposed to make me even hungrier), and nourish (as
opposed to consuming a bunch of junky empty calorie food).


That's something I can credit low carb with. Let's say that after a period
of crazy diets, low carb is only half-crazy...
But you forgot the third point of food : satisfying your pleasure. I
wouldn't like the fact of throwing away 90% of the gastronomy of my country
in the name of a diet.

Food has to be filling and actually COUNT, for me to consider it at all.
Low carb way of life (which I stumbled upon completely by ACCIDENT) has
changed my whole mindset about food.


Totally agreed. Except I don't think you need low carb to accomplish that.
Low fat certainly is neither filling nor satisfying. Low fat often tastes
bland. It's also often unhealthy, because many low fat industrial meals are
stuffed with trans fat and chemicals to give them enough texture and because
you do need fat (for vitamins, essential fatty acids...). But the fact that
low fat is bad is not a reason to switch all the way to the other extreme.
The fact that low fat is bad is just a reason to drop it in favor of a
trully balanced diet (though I do agree that cutting a bit on the high
glycemic index stuff a bit doesn't hurt).


  #8  
Old April 8th, 2004, 04:45 PM
Steve Knight
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Default Atkins Diet



Start a healthy lifestyle of exercise and eating right.
You could avoid $6,000 or more a year in the cost of
drugs and medical procedures this way.


I would like to know what eating right is??? that's up for debate.

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Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
  #9  
Old April 8th, 2004, 05:32 PM
Stan
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Default Atkins Diet

On Thu, 08 Apr 2004 15:45:22 GMT, Steve Knight
wrote:



Start a healthy lifestyle of exercise and eating right.
You could avoid $6,000 or more a year in the cost of
drugs and medical procedures this way.


I would like to know what eating right is??? that's up for debate.


Oh! Oh! I know this! Pick me!

I'm eating right. I'm eating eggs and whole wheat bread and asparagus
and apples and roast beef and chicken and salmon and cabbage and
lowfat milk and cheese and beans and lots of other good stuff. I cook
with olive oil, or, when necessary, peanut oil.

I'm following the South Beach Diet.

Stan
  #10  
Old April 8th, 2004, 07:00 PM
Crafting Mom
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Default Atkins Diet

Lictor wrote:
I eat about the same things as you do, except I also eat red meat and carbs
(rice, pasta...). The idea of cutting one part of the nutriment from my food
not only seems unhealthy to me,


I don't think I am in danger of malnutrition by not having pasta (I
cannot anyway, as I am gluten intolerant - this is the part where "I
discovered low carb by accident" comes in), and I still do on occasion
have some wild or brown basmati rice. The stuff I mentioned eating in
my previous post is not an exhaustive listing of what I eat, but the
*main* base of what I eat (I forgot to mention that I also do eat a bit
of beef, so I do get a bit of red meat). I choose, for my own personal
health, to avoid glutenous grains. The fact that it is in most of the
cultural food available in my area is not my fault, nor is it my
problem. I simply don't eat it.

How I "fell into" low carbing is a story in and of itself. The short
version is that for various health reasons I eliminated certain
ingredients from my diet. I found myself feeling incredible and then
someone told me that what I was doing 'sounded like' a low carb diet, so
it was after that, that I did a bit of digging around and reading about
what low-carbohydrate eating is.

I
of my life, I don't want it to go in the way of my enjoyment or social life.
And I don't find farmished either.


Then the only conclusion I can come to, is that your body is different
than mine and can handle different amounts of food which I eat far less
of. My way of eating doesn't get in the way of my social life. For me,
to have a body that felt as terrible as it felt when I was eating "the
old way" would seem to get in the way of my social life. My friends
still would want to be with me even if I turned down paella.

thing when you're having dinner with your friends. But what if your friends
have prepared a paella?


I would likely thank them for the thought but explain that for health
reasons I am unable to partake of the paella.

Or couscous? How do you handle that? Do you ask your
friend to prepare special food for you? Do you bring you own?


I've never had a situation where I've either had to ask my friends to
prepare a special food for me, or appear rude by turning it down. Many
of the meals we have together are a joint effort and we collaborate as
to who brings what. (Most of my friends are marrieds with children like
myself and my husband). My friends know me, and accept me for who I am.
In the same way I wouldn't feel "put out" if I made a pound of fudge for
my diabetic friend who had to turn it down.

You can't imagine the freedom there is when you are going to have dinner
with your friend, and the only reason you are worried about what they have
cooked is when it comes to pick the proper wine to go with it...


I do have such freedom. I have considerate friends and I have
consideration for them. Many people have other reasons than just "being
on some fad diet" to turn down certain foods.

That's something I can credit low carb with. Let's say that after a period
of crazy diets, low carb is only half-crazy...


Let me clarify by saying that I am not on Atkins, but I have read the
entire book. Many people associate the Atkins diet with a lifetime of
only eating meat and salad vegetables. However, there is a far wider
variety of food "allowed" on it than that. There are "phases" of the
diet which allow grains and fruits and other things.

But you forgot the third point of food : satisfying your pleasure. I
wouldn't like the fact of throwing away 90% of the gastronomy of my country
in the name of a diet.


Well, like I said, it's unfortunate that 90% of the continent (North
America being the one I am in) has an obsession with putting sugar and
flour as a filler in a lot of the food.

Totally agreed. Except I don't think you need low carb to accomplish that.


Low carbing found me by default, I didn't go looking for it. I simply
took away foods which were doing me more harm than good and by default
it turned out to be low-carb. For me, it's about ingredients, not carb
counts.

The fact that low fat is bad is just a reason to drop it in favor of a
trully balanced diet (though I do agree that cutting a bit on the high
glycemic index stuff a bit doesn't hurt).


My diet is very balanced. I just don't eat the same repertoire you eat.
I eat all kinds of vegetables, protein dishes, rice, but not every day,
sometimes even (hang on to your hat) corn bread that my friend prepares
for me, Ahhh but these are not low-carb things you say. Of course they
are not. But the base line of my diet is low carb, and the higher carb
things are things I do eat on occasion and far less frequently, without
bingeing, let me see, I eat nuts and seeds, some fruit, plain yogurt,
and I don't feel "deprived". I have the freedom now to walk for miles
without huffing and puffing (this occured even before any significant
weight was lost, about a week after changing my lifestyle), to not
invest lots of money on antacids, and a whole host of other
"unexplainable" minor, but annoying complaints I used to go running to
the doctor for.

It's almost impossible to make a generalization about what people on
low-carbohydrate diets eat or don't eat, and why, and be correct. The
media loves to slant things to create a sensational thing to talk about,
and very little of what I've read about low-carbohydrate dieting from
the news is anywhere close to reality.

Anyway, I do agree. The "low carbing" that the media has presented is
indeed unhealthy. But the low-carbing in reality, which addressess
*specific problems* (i.e. I don't agree it should be a fad that everyone
should follow) is actually quite healthy for those who have bodies (like
mine) who *need it*.

CM
 




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