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STUDY Low Fat Diet "safer" than Low Carb Diet....???



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 4th, 2008, 05:18 PM posted to alt.support.diet.low-carb
Jim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 49
Default STUDY Low Fat Diet "safer" than Low Carb Diet....???

Interesting study where the published abstract and the press release
seem to be based largely on different papers. The paper claims that the
weight loss of low fat and low carb were similar, but the actual weight
loss on low carb was almost twice that of the low fat diet, and they had
managed to have a low carb subject sample with significantly lower
initial weight than the low fat subject sample. ...... and there is
more seeming misrepresentation as well.....



PUBLISHED ABSTRACT........
http://hyper.ahajournals.org/cgi/con...tract/51/2/376


Benefit of Low-Fat Over Low-Carbohydrate Diet on Endothelial Health in
Obesity
Shane A. Phillips; Jason W. Jurva; Amjad Q. Syed; Amina Q. Syed;
Jacquelyn P. Kulinski; Joan Pleuss; Raymond G. Hoffmann; David D. Gutterman

From the Department of Medicine (S.A.P., J.W.J., AmjadQ.S., AminaQ.S.,
J.P.K., D.D.G.), Cardiovascular Center (S.A.P., J.W.J., AmjadQ.S.,
AminaQ.S., J.P.K., D.D.G.), and General Clinical Research Center (J.P.,
R.G.H.), Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; and the Department of
Physical Therapy (S.A.P.), University of Illinois at Chicago.

Correspondence to Shane A. Phillips, University of Illinois at Chicago,
1919 W Taylor St, Chicago, IL 60612. E-mail

Obesity is associated with impaired endothelial-dependent flow-mediated
dilation, a precursor to hypertension and atherosclerosis. Although
dieting generally improves cardiovascular risk factors, the direct
effect of different dietary strategies on vascular endothelial function
is not known. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that
a low-fat (LF) diet improves endothelial function compared with an
isocaloric low-carbohydrate (LC) diet. Obese (n=20; body mass index: 29
to 39; mean systolic blood pressu 107 to 125 mm Hg) and otherwise
healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to either the American Heart
Association modeled LF (30% fat calories) diet or an isocaloric LC
Atkins’ style diet (20 g of carbohydrates) for 6 weeks (4-week weight
loss and 2-week maintenance phase). Brachial flow-mediated dilation and
dilation to nitroglycerin were measured with ultrasound using automated
edge detection technology (baseline, week 2, and week 6). Blood
pressure, weight loss, and cholesterol profiles were measured throughout
the study. Weight loss was similar in LF (100±4 to 96.1±4 kg; P0.001)
and LC (95.4±4 to 89.7±4 kg; P0.001) diets......

===================== COMMENT ==========================
LF wt loss (mean) 3.9 kg [100-96.1= 3.9]
LC wt loss (mean) 5.7 kg [95.4-89.7= 5.7]

LC wt loss (mean) was slightly less than twice the LF wt loss,
consistent with many prior published studies.

======================= end comment ================================

.....Blood pressure decreased similarly in both groups (LF: 8/5 mm Hg;
LC: 12/6 mm Hg) at 6 weeks. ......

======================== COMMENT ==============

In relative terms the systolic LC BP decline was 12/8 or 50% greater
than the LF systolic BP decline.....

==================== end comment ======================

..... After 6 weeks, the percentage of flow-mediated dilation improved
(1.9±0.8; P0.05) in the LF diet but was reduced in the LC diet
(–1.4±0.6; P0.05) versus baseline. Dilation to nitroglycerin and lipid
panels was similar at 0, 2, and 6 weeks. Despite similar degrees of
weight loss and changes blood pressure, LF diets improved brachial
artery flow-mediated dilation over LC diets. LF diets may confer greater
cardiovascular protection than LC diets.


--------------------------------------------------------------

PRESS RELEASE CLAIMS -- sounds like a different paper than the abstract.


Low-fat Diets More Likely To Reduce Risk Of Heart Disease Than Low-carb
Diets

ScienceDaily (Mar. 3, 2008) — Low-fat diets are more effective in
preserving and promoting a healthy cardiovascular system than
low-carbohydrate, Atkins'-like diets, according to a new study by
researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

The study, published in the February edition of the scientific journal
Hypertension, was led by David D. Gutterman, M.D., Northwestern Mutual
Professor of Cardiology, professor of medicine and physiology, and
senior associate dean of research at the Medical College. Shane
Phillips, M.D., a former Cardiology faculty member at the Medical
College, and now assistant professor in the department of physical
therapy at the University of Illinois - Chicago, was the lead author.

Public awareness of the "obesity epidemic" has resulted in various
dietary weight loss strategies. In America, it is estimated that 45
percent of women and 30 percent of men diet to lose weight.

"The nutrient-specific effects of these diets on cardiovascular health
are largely unknown," says Dr. Gutterman.

"Low-carbohydrate diets are significantly higher in total grams of fat,
protein, dietary cholesterol and saturated fats than are low-fat diets.
While a low-carbohydrate diet may result in weight loss and improvement
in blood pressure, similar to a low-fat diet, the higher fat content is
ultimately more detrimental to heart health than is the low-fat diet
suggested by the American Heart Association," points out Dr. Phillips.

"The higher fat content of a low-carbohydrate diet may put dieters at an
increased risk of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) because
low-carbohydrate diets often reduce protection of the endothelium, the
thin layer of cells that line the blood vessels of the circulatory
system. The reduced production from the endothelium of nitric oxide, a
specific chemical, puts the vessel at higher risk of abnormal
thickening, greater clotting potential, and cholesterol deposition, all
part of the atherosclerosis process," says Dr. Gutterman.

Over a six-week period, the researchers found reduced flow-mediated
dilation in the arm artery in participants who were on the
low-carbohydrate diet. Reduced flow-mediated dilation, as measured in
this study, is an early indicator of cardiovascular disease. On the
other hand, flow-mediated dilation improved significantly in
participants on the low-fat diet suggesting a healthier artery which is
less prone to developing atherosclerosis.

"We observed a reduction in brachial artery flow-mediated dilation after
six weeks of weight loss on a low-carbohydrate, Atkins'-style diet," Dr.
Gutterman says.

Low-carbohydrate diets were also found to have significantly less daily
folic acid than low-fat diets. Folic acid is thought to be helpful in
reducing the likeliness of heart disease. This protective effect results
from the antioxidant property of folic acid and its ability to lower
levels of homocysteine, a naturally occurring amino acid that can be
dangerous at elevated levels.

========================= COMMENT =========================

Atkins recommends vitamin supplements with the low carb diet, and
specifically includes folic acid....

======================== end comment =========================


The low-carbohydrate diet provided 20 grams of carbohydrates daily and
was supplemented with protein and fat content according to the Atkins'
diet recommendations. The low-fat diet provided 30 percent of the
calories as fat, and was modeled after the American Heart Association's
recommendations.

"The composition of diet may be as important as the degree of weight
loss in determining the effect of dietary interventions on vascular
health," Dr. Gutterman notes.

Twenty participants between the ages of 18 to 50 with a body mass index
ranging from 29 to 39 were monitored for the study, and the type of diet
was randomly assigned to participants. Weight loss, flow-mediated
dilation, blood pressure and insulin and glucose levels in the
participants were measured every two weeks for the six-week study.

The study was funded by the support of the National Institutes of Health
General Clinical Research Center and the Medical College of Wisconsin
Cardiovascular Center. It was conducted at Froedtert Hospital, the
College's major teaching affiliate.

Co-authors of the study included Jason Jurva, M.D., assistant professor
of medicine; Amjad Syed, resident in surgery (University of Illinois --
Chicago); Amina Syed, resident in family practice with the Medical
College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals; Jacquelyn Kulinski, senior
medical student; Joan Pleuss, senior research dietician; and Raymond
Hoffmann, Ph.D., professor of population health in the division of
biostatistics.



  #2  
Old March 4th, 2008, 06:56 PM posted to alt.support.diet.low-carb
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default STUDY Low Fat Diet "safer" than Low Carb Diet....???

On Mar 5, 12:18 am, Jim wrote:
Interesting study where the published abstract and the press release
seem to be based largely on different papers. The paper claims that the
weight loss of low fat and low carb were similar, but the actual weight
loss on low carb was almost twice that of the low fat diet, and they had
managed to have a low carb subject sample with significantly lower
initial weight than the low fat subject sample. ...... and there is
more seeming misrepresentation as well.....

PUBLISHED ABSTRACT........http://hyper.ahajournals.org/cgi/con...tract/51/2/376

Benefit of Low-Fat Over Low-Carbohydrate Diet on Endothelial Health in
Obesity
Shane A. Phillips; Jason W. Jurva; Amjad Q. Syed; Amina Q. Syed;
Jacquelyn P. Kulinski; Joan Pleuss; Raymond G. Hoffmann; David D. Gutterman

From the Department of Medicine (S.A.P., J.W.J., AmjadQ.S., AminaQ.S.,
J.P.K., D.D.G.), Cardiovascular Center (S.A.P., J.W.J., AmjadQ.S.,
AminaQ.S., J.P.K., D.D.G.), and General Clinical Research Center (J.P.,
R.G.H.), Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; and the Department of
Physical Therapy (S.A.P.), University of Illinois at Chicago.

Correspondence to Shane A. Phillips, University of Illinois at Chicago,
1919 W Taylor St, Chicago, IL 60612. E-mail

Obesity is associated with impaired endothelial-dependent flow-mediated
dilation, a precursor to hypertension and atherosclerosis. Although
dieting generally improves cardiovascular risk factors, the direct
effect of different dietary strategies on vascular endothelial function
is not known. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that
a low-fat (LF) diet improves endothelial function compared with an
isocaloric low-carbohydrate (LC) diet. Obese (n=20; body mass index: 29
to 39; mean systolic blood pressu 107 to 125 mm Hg) and otherwise
healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to either the American Heart
Association modeled LF (30% fat calories) diet or an isocaloric LC
Atkins' style diet (20 g of carbohydrates) for 6 weeks (4-week weight
loss and 2-week maintenance phase). Brachial flow-mediated dilation and
dilation to nitroglycerin were measured with ultrasound using automated
edge detection technology (baseline, week 2, and week 6). Blood
pressure, weight loss, and cholesterol profiles were measured throughout
the study. Weight loss was similar in LF (100±4 to 96.1±4 kg; P0.001)
and LC (95.4±4 to 89.7±4 kg; P0.001) diets......

===================== COMMENT ==========================
LF wt loss (mean) 3.9 kg [100-96.1= 3.9]
LC wt loss (mean) 5.7 kg [95.4-89.7= 5.7]

LC wt loss (mean) was slightly less than twice the LF wt loss,
consistent with many prior published studies.

======================= end comment ================================

....Blood pressure decreased similarly in both groups (LF: 8/5 mm Hg;
LC: 12/6 mm Hg) at 6 weeks. ......

======================== COMMENT ==============

In relative terms the systolic LC BP decline was 12/8 or 50% greater
than the LF systolic BP decline.....

==================== end comment ======================

.... After 6 weeks, the percentage of flow-mediated dilation improved
(1.9±0.8; P0.05) in the LF diet but was reduced in the LC diet
(-1.4±0.6; P0.05) versus baseline. Dilation to nitroglycerin and lipid
panels was similar at 0, 2, and 6 weeks. Despite similar degrees of
weight loss and changes blood pressure, LF diets improved brachial
artery flow-mediated dilation over LC diets. LF diets may confer greater
cardiovascular protection than LC diets.

--------------------------------------------------------------

PRESS RELEASE CLAIMS -- sounds like a different paper than the abstract.

Low-fat Diets More Likely To Reduce Risk Of Heart Disease Than Low-carb
Diets

ScienceDaily (Mar. 3, 2008) -- Low-fat diets are more effective in
preserving and promoting a healthy cardiovascular system than
low-carbohydrate, Atkins'-like diets, according to a new study by
researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

The study, published in the February edition of the scientific journal
Hypertension, was led by David D. Gutterman, M.D., Northwestern Mutual
Professor of Cardiology, professor of medicine and physiology, and
senior associate dean of research at the Medical College. Shane
Phillips, M.D., a former Cardiology faculty member at the Medical
College, and now assistant professor in the department of physical
therapy at the University of Illinois - Chicago, was the lead author.

Public awareness of the "obesity epidemic" has resulted in various
dietary weight loss strategies. In America, it is estimated that 45
percent of women and 30 percent of men diet to lose weight.

"The nutrient-specific effects of these diets on cardiovascular health
are largely unknown," says Dr. Gutterman.

"Low-carbohydrate diets are significantly higher in total grams of fat,
protein, dietary cholesterol and saturated fats than are low-fat diets.
While a low-carbohydrate diet may result in weight loss and improvement
in blood pressure, similar to a low-fat diet, the higher fat content is
ultimately more detrimental to heart health than is the low-fat diet
suggested by the American Heart Association," points out Dr. Phillips.

"The higher fat content of a low-carbohydrate diet may put dieters at an
increased risk of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) because
low-carbohydrate diets often reduce protection of the endothelium, the
thin layer of cells that line the blood vessels of the circulatory
system. The reduced production from the endothelium of nitric oxide, a
specific chemical, puts the vessel at higher risk of abnormal
thickening, greater clotting potential, and cholesterol deposition, all
part of the atherosclerosis process," says Dr. Gutterman.

Over a six-week period, the researchers found reduced flow-mediated
dilation in the arm artery in participants who were on the
low-carbohydrate diet. Reduced flow-mediated dilation, as measured in
this study, is an early indicator of cardiovascular disease. On the
other hand, flow-mediated dilation improved significantly in
participants on the low-fat diet suggesting a healthier artery which is
less prone to developing atherosclerosis.

"We observed a reduction in brachial artery flow-mediated dilation after
six weeks of weight loss on a low-carbohydrate, Atkins'-style diet," Dr.
Gutterman says.

Low-carbohydrate diets were also found to have significantly less daily
folic acid than low-fat diets. Folic acid is thought to be helpful in
reducing the likeliness of heart disease. This protective effect results
from the antioxidant property of folic acid and its ability to lower
levels of homocysteine, a naturally occurring amino acid that can be
dangerous at elevated levels.

========================= COMMENT =========================

Atkins recommends vitamin supplements with the low carb diet, and
specifically includes folic acid....

======================== end comment =========================

The low-carbohydrate diet provided 20 grams of carbohydrates daily and
was supplemented with protein and fat content according to the Atkins'
diet recommendations. The low-fat diet provided 30 percent of the
calories as fat, and was modeled after the American Heart Association's
recommendations.

"The composition of diet may be as important as the degree of weight
loss in determining the effect of dietary interventions on vascular
health," Dr. Gutterman notes.

Twenty participants between the ages of 18 to 50 with a body mass index
ranging from 29 to 39 were monitored for the study, and the type of diet
was randomly assigned to participants. Weight loss, flow-mediated
dilation, blood pressure and insulin and glucose levels in the
participants were measured every two weeks for the six-week study.

The study was funded by the support of the National Institutes of Health
General Clinical Research Center and the Medical College of Wisconsin
Cardiovascular Center. It was conducted at Froedtert Hospital, the
College's major teaching affiliate.

Co-authors of the study included Jason Jurva, M.D., assistant professor
of medicine; Amjad Syed, resident in surgery (University of Illinois --
Chicago); Amina Syed, resident in family practice with the Medical
College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals; Jacquelyn Kulinski, senior
medical student; Joan Pleuss, senior research dietician; and Raymond
Hoffmann, Ph.D., professor of population health in the division of
biostatistics.


Try HERBALIFE.. It's a protein diet scheme. Really works for me.
And best of all, it is healthy !!! Want to know more..Email me at

  #3  
Old March 4th, 2008, 09:30 PM posted to alt.support.diet.low-carb
Tunderbar
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 72
Default STUDY Low Fat Diet "safer" than Low Carb Diet....???

On Mar 4, 10:18 am, Jim wrote:
Interesting study where the published abstract and the press release
seem to be based largely on different papers. The paper claims that the
weight loss of low fat and low carb were similar, but the actual weight
loss on low carb was almost twice that of the low fat diet, and they had
managed to have a low carb subject sample with significantly lower
initial weight than the low fat subject sample. ...... and there is
more seeming misrepresentation as well.....

PUBLISHED ABSTRACT........http://hyper.ahajournals.org/cgi/con...tract/51/2/376

Benefit of Low-Fat Over Low-Carbohydrate Diet on Endothelial Health in
Obesity
Shane A. Phillips; Jason W. Jurva; Amjad Q. Syed; Amina Q. Syed;
Jacquelyn P. Kulinski; Joan Pleuss; Raymond G. Hoffmann; David D. Gutterman

From the Department of Medicine (S.A.P., J.W.J., AmjadQ.S., AminaQ.S.,
J.P.K., D.D.G.), Cardiovascular Center (S.A.P., J.W.J., AmjadQ.S.,
AminaQ.S., J.P.K., D.D.G.), and General Clinical Research Center (J.P.,
R.G.H.), Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; and the Department of
Physical Therapy (S.A.P.), University of Illinois at Chicago.

Correspondence to Shane A. Phillips, University of Illinois at Chicago,
1919 W Taylor St, Chicago, IL 60612. E-mail

Obesity is associated with impaired endothelial-dependent flow-mediated
dilation, a precursor to hypertension and atherosclerosis. Although
dieting generally improves cardiovascular risk factors, the direct
effect of different dietary strategies on vascular endothelial function
is not known. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that
a low-fat (LF) diet improves endothelial function compared with an
isocaloric low-carbohydrate (LC) diet. Obese (n=20; body mass index: 29
to 39; mean systolic blood pressu 107 to 125 mm Hg) and otherwise
healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to either the American Heart
Association modeled LF (30% fat calories) diet or an isocaloric LC
Atkins' style diet (20 g of carbohydrates) for 6 weeks (4-week weight
loss and 2-week maintenance phase). Brachial flow-mediated dilation and
dilation to nitroglycerin were measured with ultrasound using automated
edge detection technology (baseline, week 2, and week 6). Blood
pressure, weight loss, and cholesterol profiles were measured throughout
the study. Weight loss was similar in LF (100±4 to 96.1±4 kg; P0.001)
and LC (95.4±4 to 89.7±4 kg; P0.001) diets......

===================== COMMENT ==========================
LF wt loss (mean) 3.9 kg [100-96.1= 3.9]
LC wt loss (mean) 5.7 kg [95.4-89.7= 5.7]

LC wt loss (mean) was slightly less than twice the LF wt loss,
consistent with many prior published studies.

======================= end comment ================================

....Blood pressure decreased similarly in both groups (LF: 8/5 mm Hg;
LC: 12/6 mm Hg) at 6 weeks. ......

======================== COMMENT ==============

In relative terms the systolic LC BP decline was 12/8 or 50% greater
than the LF systolic BP decline.....

==================== end comment ======================

.... After 6 weeks, the percentage of flow-mediated dilation improved
(1.9±0.8; P0.05) in the LF diet but was reduced in the LC diet
(-1.4±0.6; P0.05) versus baseline. Dilation to nitroglycerin and lipid
panels was similar at 0, 2, and 6 weeks. Despite similar degrees of
weight loss and changes blood pressure, LF diets improved brachial
artery flow-mediated dilation over LC diets. LF diets may confer greater
cardiovascular protection than LC diets.

--------------------------------------------------------------

PRESS RELEASE CLAIMS -- sounds like a different paper than the abstract.

Low-fat Diets More Likely To Reduce Risk Of Heart Disease Than Low-carb
Diets

ScienceDaily (Mar. 3, 2008) -- Low-fat diets are more effective in
preserving and promoting a healthy cardiovascular system than
low-carbohydrate, Atkins'-like diets, according to a new study by
researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

The study, published in the February edition of the scientific journal
Hypertension, was led by David D. Gutterman, M.D., Northwestern Mutual
Professor of Cardiology, professor of medicine and physiology, and
senior associate dean of research at the Medical College. Shane
Phillips, M.D., a former Cardiology faculty member at the Medical
College, and now assistant professor in the department of physical
therapy at the University of Illinois - Chicago, was the lead author.

Public awareness of the "obesity epidemic" has resulted in various
dietary weight loss strategies. In America, it is estimated that 45
percent of women and 30 percent of men diet to lose weight.

"The nutrient-specific effects of these diets on cardiovascular health
are largely unknown," says Dr. Gutterman.

"Low-carbohydrate diets are significantly higher in total grams of fat,
protein, dietary cholesterol and saturated fats than are low-fat diets.
While a low-carbohydrate diet may result in weight loss and improvement
in blood pressure, similar to a low-fat diet, the higher fat content is
ultimately more detrimental to heart health than is the low-fat diet
suggested by the American Heart Association," points out Dr. Phillips.

"The higher fat content of a low-carbohydrate diet may put dieters at an
increased risk of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) because
low-carbohydrate diets often reduce protection of the endothelium, the
thin layer of cells that line the blood vessels of the circulatory
system. The reduced production from the endothelium of nitric oxide, a
specific chemical, puts the vessel at higher risk of abnormal
thickening, greater clotting potential, and cholesterol deposition, all
part of the atherosclerosis process," says Dr. Gutterman.

Over a six-week period, the researchers found reduced flow-mediated
dilation in the arm artery in participants who were on the
low-carbohydrate diet. Reduced flow-mediated dilation, as measured in
this study, is an early indicator of cardiovascular disease. On the
other hand, flow-mediated dilation improved significantly in
participants on the low-fat diet suggesting a healthier artery which is
less prone to developing atherosclerosis.

"We observed a reduction in brachial artery flow-mediated dilation after
six weeks of weight loss on a low-carbohydrate, Atkins'-style diet," Dr.
Gutterman says.

Low-carbohydrate diets were also found to have significantly less daily
folic acid than low-fat diets. Folic acid is thought to be helpful in
reducing the likeliness of heart disease. This protective effect results
from the antioxidant property of folic acid and its ability to lower
levels of homocysteine, a naturally occurring amino acid that can be
dangerous at elevated levels.

========================= COMMENT =========================

Atkins recommends vitamin supplements with the low carb diet, and
specifically includes folic acid....

======================== end comment =========================

The low-carbohydrate diet provided 20 grams of carbohydrates daily and
was supplemented with protein and fat content according to the Atkins'
diet recommendations. The low-fat diet provided 30 percent of the
calories as fat, and was modeled after the American Heart Association's
recommendations.

"The composition of diet may be as important as the degree of weight
loss in determining the effect of dietary interventions on vascular
health," Dr. Gutterman notes.

Twenty participants between the ages of 18 to 50 with a body mass index
ranging from 29 to 39 were monitored for the study, and the type of diet
was randomly assigned to participants. Weight loss, flow-mediated
dilation, blood pressure and insulin and glucose levels in the
participants were measured every two weeks for the six-week study.

The study was funded by the support of the National Institutes of Health
General Clinical Research Center and the Medical College of Wisconsin
Cardiovascular Center. It was conducted at Froedtert Hospital, the
College's major teaching affiliate.

Co-authors of the study included Jason Jurva, M.D., assistant professor
of medicine; Amjad Syed, resident in surgery (University of Illinois --
Chicago); Amina Syed, resident in family practice with the Medical
College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals; Jacquelyn Kulinski, senior
medical student; Joan Pleuss, senior research dietician; and Raymond
Hoffmann, Ph.D., professor of population health in the division of
biostatistics.


http://www.cspinet.org/cgi-bin/integrity.cgi

David D. Gutterman, M.D., F.C.C.P., Professor of Medicine and
Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. Has stock options
with Johnson & Johnson. Has a relative who is a vice-president of
GlaxoSmithKline. (Chest 2004;126:1)
 




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